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ISSN: 2052-5206

Structures of the mono­fluoro- and mono­chloro­phenols at low temperature and high pressure

aSchool of Chemistry and The Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions, The University of Edinburgh, King's Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JJ, Scotland, and bCambridge Crystallographic Data Centre, 12 Union Road, Cambridge CB2 1EZ, England
*Correspondence e-mail: s.parsons@ed.ac.uk

(Received 23 August 2004; accepted 23 November 2004)

2-Fluorophenol, 3-fluorophenol and 3-chlorophenol were recrystallized from frozen solids at 260, 263 and 283 K. All compounds were also crystallized by the application of high pressure (0.36, 0.12 and 0.10 GPa). While 3-fluorophenol and 3-chlorophenol yielded the same phases under both conditions, different polymorphs were obtained for 2-fluorophenol. 4-Chlorophenol was crystallized both from the melt and from benzene to yield two different ambient-pressure polymorphs; crystallization from the melt at 0.02 GPa yielded the same phase as from benzene at ambient pressure. 3-Fluorophenol is unusual in forming a hydrogen-bonded chain along a 21 screw axis. Such behaviour is usually only observed for small alcohols, but here it appears to be stabilized by intermolecular C—H⋯F hydrogen-bond formation. 3-Chlorophenol is a more typical large alcohol and emulates a fourfold screw axis with two independent molecules positioned about a 21 axis, although there are significant distortions from this ideal geometry. The two phases of 4-chlorophenol consist of chains or rings connected by C—Cl⋯H interactions. The low-temperature and high-pressure polymorphs of 2-fluorophenol consist of chains of molecules connected through OH⋯OH hydrogen bonds; while inter-chain C—H⋯F interactions are significant at high pressure, there are none in the low-temperature form.

1. Introduction

Packing in alcohols has been studied by Brock & Duncan (1994[Brock, C. P. & Duncan, L. L. (1994). Chem. Mater. 6, 1307-1312.]) and subsequently by Taylor & Macrae (2001[Taylor, R. & Macrae, C. F. (2001). Acta Cryst. B57, 815-827.]). Both studies showed that the size of the R-group attached to the alcohol functionality is a major factor in the packing behaviour of the molecules. We have recently investigated (Oswald et al., 2005[Oswald, I. D. H., Allan, D. R., Day, G. M, Motherwell, W. D. S. & Parsons, S. (2005). Accepted for publication.]) the effect of high pressure on the crystal structures of phenol (Allan et al., 2002[Allan, D. R., Clark, S. J., Dawson, A., McGregor, P. A. & Parsons, S. (2002). Acta Cryst. B58, 1018-1024.]), 2-chlorophenol and 4-fluoro­phenol, which all exhibit polymorphic behaviour on application of pressure. At ambient pressure 2-chlorophenol and 4-fluorophenol crystallize in high-symmetry space groups with the molecules disposed about 32 and [\bar 3] symmetry operators; phenol packs via a pseudo-threefold axis in P21. All three systems crystallize under pressure in low-symmetry space groups with the molecules disposed about 21 screw axes. Fig. 1[link] illustrates the change in structure between ambient and high pressure for 2-chlorophenol. At ambient pressure the molecules adopt an arrangement in which the halophenyl group behaves as a bulky substituent. At high pressure, both compounds undergo a phase transition to a packing motif characteristic of a small alcohol. This paper describes the crystal structure determination of the remaining chloro- and fluorophenols at low temperature and high pressure to investigate whether the packing behaviour of these phenols can be altered with the application of pressures < 1 GPa.

[Figure 1]
Figure 1
(a) Crystal structures of 2-chlorophenol at ambient pressure and 100 K. Helices are formed about 32 axes by OH⋯OH hydrogen-bond formation. (b) The crystal structure of 2-chlorophenol at 0.12 GPa. The application of pressure changes the behaviour of the chlorophenyl substituent so that chains are formed where molecules are related by a 21 screw axis. Colour scheme: C black, Cl green, H light turquoise, O red.

2. Experimental

All samples were obtained from Sigma–Aldrich and used as received.

2.1. Low-temperature crystal growth

2-Fluorophenol (m.p. 289 K), 3-fluorophenol (m.p. 287 K) and 3-chlorophenol (m.p. 306 K) were each drawn into a capillary, and polycrystalline masses obtained by freezing at 260, 263 and 283 K, respectively. The samples were then recrystallized using the laser-assisted procedure of Boese & Nussbaumer (1994[Boese, R. & Nussbaumer, M. (1994). In Correlations, Transformations, and Interactions in Organic Crystal Chemistry, edited by D. W. Jones & A. Katrusiak, pp. 20-37. International Union of Crystallography, Crystallographic Symposia 7. Oxford University Press.]). All capillaries (o.d. 0.32–0.52 mm) were hand-drawn from 4 mm o.d. Pyrex® glass tube. Phase I of 4-chlorophenol (m.p. 316 K) was obtained by melting a sample in a vial and leaving it to recrystallize at room temperature. Small, colourless crystals appeared on the side of the vial. Colourless crystals of phase II of 4-chlorophenol were obtained by holding a saturated benzene solution at 277 K.

2.2. Crystal structure determination at low temperature

X-ray diffraction intensities were collected with Mo Kα radiation on a Bruker Smart Apex CCD diffractometer equipped with an Oxford Cryosystems Cryostream-Plus variable-temperature device (Cosier & Glazer, 1986[Cosier, J. & Glazer, A. M. (1986). J. Appl. Cryst. 19, 105-107.]) and an OHCD laser-assisted crystallization device. Absorption corrections were carried out using the multiscan procedure SADABS (Sheldrick, 2004[Sheldrick, G. M. (2004). SADABS, Version 2004-1. University of Göttingen, Germany, Bruker-AXS, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.], based on the procedure described by Blessing, 1995[Blessing, R. H. (1995). Acta Cryst. A51, 33-38.]). All the structures were solved by direct methods (SIR92; Altomare et al., 1993[Altomare, A., Cascarano, G., Giacovazzo, C. & Guagliardi, A. (1993). J. Appl. Cryst. 26, 343-350.]) and refined by full-matrix least-squares against F2 using all data (CRYSTALS; Betteridge et al., 2003[Betteridge, P. W., Carruthers, J. R., Cooper, R. I., Prout, K. & Watkin, D. J. (2003). J. Appl. Cryst. 36, 1487.]). H atoms were attached to C atoms in calculated positions and allowed to ride on their parent atoms. H atoms involved in hydrogen bonding were located in difference maps and refined with distance restraints. All non-H atoms were modelled with anisotropic displacement parameters.

2.3. High pressure: general procedures

Pressure was applied to the samples using a Merrill–Bassett diamond anvil cell (DAC; Merrill & Bassett, 1974[Merrill, L. & Bassett, W. A. (1974). Rev. Sci. Instrum. 45, 290-294.]) equipped with 600 µm culets, a tungsten gasket with a 300 µm hole, beryllium backing disks and a chip of ruby for pressure measurement. Pressures were measured by the ruby-fluorescence method by excitation with a 632.817 nm line from a He–Ne laser using a Jobin–Yvon LabRam 300 Raman spectrometer.

2.4. High-pressure crystal growth

The samples were loaded as liquids into the cell. In the case of 4-chloro- and 4-fluorophenol, both the sample and the cell were heated with a hot-air gun before loading to prevent crystallization at ambient temperature. In each case, pressure was applied until a polycrystalline mass was produced; the temperature of the cell was increased using a hot-air gun until a single crystallite remained. Slow cooling to ambient temperature yielded a single crystal that filled the entire gasket hole. Crystallization was monitored visually using a polarizing microscope. The crystallization pressures for each sample were as follows: 3-chlorophenol, 0.10 GPa; 3-fluorophenol, 0.12 GPa; 4-chlorophenol, 0.02 GPa; 2-fluorophenol, 0.36 GPa.

2.5. Crystal structure determinations at high pressure

Data were collected on a Bruker SMART APEX diffractometer with Mo Kα radiation. The collection and processing procedures followed were those described by Dawson et al. (2004[Dawson, A., Allan, D. R., Parsons, S. & Ruf, M. (2004). J. Appl. Cryst. 37, 410-416.]).

Shading by the body of the DAC leads to low data completeness for crystals belonging to low-symmetry crystal systems. In all cases, except 2-fluorophenol, datasets were collected with the cell mounted in two different orientations in order to improve completeness. The diffraction patterns were indexed with the program GEMINI (Sparks, 2000[Sparks, R. A. (2000). GEMINI, Version 1.01. Bruker-AXS, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.]). Data integration (to 2θ = 45°) was performed using SAINT (Bruker–Nonius, 2003[Bruker-Nonius (2003). SAINT, Version 7. Bruker-Nonius Inc., Madison, Wisconsin, USA.]) with dynamic masking to account for the shading from the DAC steel body (ECLIPSE; Parsons, 2004a[Parsons, S. (2004a) ECLIPSE. The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.]). The program SHADE (Parsons, 2004b[Parsons, S. (2004b) SHADE. The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.]) was also used to take account of absorption effects of the diamonds and beryllium; further systematic errors were treated using SADABS before merging in SORTAV (Blessing, 1997[Blessing, R. H. (1997). J. Appl. Cryst. 30, 421-426.]).

The phases obtained for 3-fluorophenol, 3-chlorophenol and 4-chlorophenol corresponded to compressed forms of known ambient-pressure phases. Refinement against the high-pressure data therefore used the ambient-pressure coordinates as a starting model.

The structures were refined by full-matrix least-squares against F2 (CRYSTALS) using all data. Free refinement of the positional parameters of the non-H atoms yielded carbon–carbon bond lengths varying from 1.34 to 1.40 Å. The phenyl rings were therefore constrained to be rigid hexagons. H atoms were attached to C atoms in calculated positions. The hydroxyl H atom, which is involved in hydrogen bonding, was geometrically placed except for 4-chlorophenol where the hydroxyl hydrogen was identified from the difference map and refined with distance and angular restraints. All oxygen and halogen atoms were modelled with anisotropic displacement parameters. The refinement of the crystal structure of 3-fluorophenol was subject to distance and angle restraints. 2-Fluorophenol, 3-chlorophenol and 4-chlorophenol were refined so that chemically similar bond distances and angles were subject to similarity restraints.

2.6. 2-Fluorophenol

Several attempts to grow a single crystal of 2-fluorophenol at high pressure resulted in the crystal fracturing after cooling to ambient temperature. Although the diffraction patterns obtained from these samples were characterized by broad, split reflections, they could, nevertheless, be indexed on an orthorhombic unit cell with the dimensions: a = 5.8952 (17), b = 10.9466 (19), c = 16.459 (4) Å. This is different to the cell obtained at 150 K (see Table 1[link]). A solution was obtained using DASH (David et al., 2001[David, W. I. F., Shankland, K., Cole, J., Maginn, S., Motherwell, W. D. S. & Taylor, R. (2001). DASH User's Manual. Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre, Cambridge, UK.]; see below), but after refinement the residual remained in the region of R1 = 0.17. The refined structure, which contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit in the space group P212121, was characterized by high displacement parameters (0.2–0.3 Å2) on the F atoms, while the data, although strong at low angle, had no significant intensity above about 2θ = 35°. These observations imply that at 0.36 GPa and room temperature 2-fluorophenol forms a disordered phase. Difference maps failed to provide any clue as to how the structure might be better modelled, probably because of the relatively low completeness or poor reflection peak shapes. Since we are unable to improve modelling of the data, no further details on this phase are reported here.

Table 1
Experimental table

Weighting scheme: p = P(6)*max(Fo2,0) + (1 − P(6))Fc2. Method = SHELXL97 (Sheldrick, 1997[Sheldrick, G. M. (1997). SHELXL97. University of Göttingen, Germany.]).

  3-Fluorophenol at 150 K (3F) 3-Fluorophenol at 0.12 GPa (3FP) 3-Chlorophenol at 150 K (3CL) 3-Chlorophenol at 0.1 GPa (3CLP) 4-Chlorphenol phase I at 150 K (4CL1)
Crystal data
Chemical formula C6H5FO C6H5FO C6H5ClO C6H5ClO C6H5ClO
Mr 112.10 112.10 128.56 128.56 128.56
Cell setting, space group Monoclinic, P21 Monoclinic, P21 Orthorhombic, P212121 Orthorhombic, P212121 Monoclinic, P21/c
a, b, c (Å) 5.6510 (12), 5.0642 (10), 9.3185 (19) 5.6747 (9), 5.0760 (4), 9.4753 (13) 3.9846 (5), 13.9272 (19), 20.699 (3) 4.0949 (4), 13.875 (3), 20.716 (3) 8.7086 (11), 15.4523 (19), 8.7414 (11)
β (°) 107.518 (4) 107.832 (11) 90 90 93.954 (2)
V3) 254.31 (9) 259.82 (6) 1148.7 (3) 1177.0 (3) 1173.5 (3)
Z 2 2 8 8 8
Dx (Mg m−3) 1.464 1.433 1.487 1.451 1.455
Radiation type Mo Kα Mo Kα Mo Kα Mo Kα Mo Kα
No. of reflections for cell parameters 711 398 1504 983 3307
θ range (°) 2–28 5–23 5–25 3–23 2–29
μ (mm−1) 0.12 0.12 0.55 0.53 0.53
Temperature (K) 150 293 150 293 150
Crystal form, colour Cylinder, colourless Blocks, colourless Rod, colourless Colourless, block Block, colourless
Crystal size (mm) 1.00 × 0.32 × 0.32 0.30 × 0.30 × 0.18 0.90 × 0.10 × 0.10 0.30 × 0.30 × 0.18 0.44 × 0.38 × 0.25
           
Data collection
Diffractometer Bruker SMART Bruker SMART Bruker SMART Bruker SMART Bruker SMART
Data collection method ω scans ω scans ω scans ω scans ω scans
Absorption correction Multi-scan (based on symmetry-related measurements) Multi-scan (based on symmetry-related measurements) Multi-scan (based on symmetry-related measurements) Multi-scan (based on symmetry-related measurements) Multi-scan (based on symmetry-related measurements)
Tmin 0.67 0.67 0.22 0.85 0.69
Tmax 0.96 0.98 0.95 0.91 0.88
No. of measured, independent and observed reflections 1603, 672, 608 1310, 159, 146 4548, 1987, 1376 6533, 780, 476 7471, 2839, 2442
Criterion for observed reflections I > 2σ(I) I > 2σ(I) I > 2σ(I) I > 2σ(I) I > 2σ(I)
Rint 0.014 0.041 0.052 0.147 0.024
θmax (°) 28.6 23.2 25.0 23.3 28.8
Range of h, k, l −6 → h → 7 −1 → h → 2 −4 → h → 4 0 → h → 4 −9 → h → 11
  −6 → k → 6 −5 → k → 0 −16 → k → 15 0 → k → 13 −20 → k → 19
  −12 → l → 9 −10 → l → 0 −24 → l → 22 0 → l → 21 −11 → l → 10
           
Refinement
Refinement on F2 F2 F2 F2 F2
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)], wR(F2), S 0.037, 0.092, 1.05 0.064, 0.160, 1.15 0.069, 0.143, 0.94 0.098, 0.244, 0.99 0.039, 0.101, 0.74
No. of reflections 672 159 1977 780 2839
No. of parameters 77 32 152 62 152
H-atom treatment Mixture of independent and constrained refinement Not refined Mixture of independent and constrained refinement Not refined Mixture of independent and constrained refinement
Weighting scheme w = 1/[σ2(F2) + (P(1)p)2 + P(2)p + P(4) + P(5)sin θ]; P(i) are: 0.553E −1; 0.625E−3, 0.00, 0.00, 0.00, 0.333 w = 1/[σ2(F2) + (P(1)p)2 + P(2)p + P(4) + P(5)sin θ]; P(i) are: 0.694E−1, 0.349, 0.00, 0.00, 0.00, 0.333 w = 1/[σ2(F2) + (P(1)p)2 + P(2)p + P(4) + P(5)sin θ]; P(i) are: 0.00, 0.00, 0.00, 0.00, 0.00, 0.333 w = 1/[σ2(F2) + (P(1)p)2 + P(2)p + P(4) + P(5)sin θ]; P(i) are: 0.106, 5.04, 0.00, 0.00, 0.00, 0.333 w = 1/[σ2(F2) + (P(1)p)2 + P(2)p + P(4) + P(5)sin θ]; P(i) are: 0.684E−1, 0.725, 0.00, 0.00, 0.00, 0.333
(Δ/σ)max < 0.0001 < 0.0001 < 0.0001 0.004 0.001
Δρmax, Δρmin (e Å−3) 0.22, −0.22 0.17, −0.16 0.56, −0.58 0.59, −0.56 0.33, −0.31
Extinction method None None None None Larson (1970[Larson, A. C. (1970). Crystallogr. Comput. Proc. Int. Summer Sch. pp. 291-294.])
Extinction coefficient 45 (11)
  4-Chlorophenol phase II at 150 K (4CL2) 4-Chlorophenol phase II at 0.02 GPa (4CL2P) 2-Fluorophenol phase I at 150 K (2F1) 2-Fluorophenol phase II at 0.36 GPa and 403 K (2F2P)
Crystal data
Chemical formula C6H5ClO C6H5ClO C6H5FO C6H5FO
Mr 128.56 128.56 112.10 112.10
Cell setting, space group Monoclinic, P21/c Monoclinic, P21/c Monoclinic, C2/c Orthorhombic, P212121
a, b, c (Å) 3.9724 (5), 12.7328 (17), 23.155 (3) 4.1096 (4), 12.7665 (10), 23.181 (3) 17.1336 (10), 8.2766 (5), 11.4975 (7) 5.7168 (7), 9.9997 (19), 17.868 (2)
β (°) 94.126 (2) 94.201 (14) 100.234 (2) 90
V3) 1168.2 (3) 1212.9 (2) 1604.50 (17) 1021.4 (3)
Z 8 8 12 8
Dx (Mg m−3) 1.462 1.408 1.392 1.458
Radiation type Mo Kα Mo Kα Mo Kα Mo Kα
No. of reflections for cell parameters 2464 1170 2044 397
θ range (°) 3–28 3–19 2–26 3–20
μ (mm−1) 0.54 0.52 0.12 0.12
Temperature (K) 150 293 150 403
Crystal form, colour Plate, colourless Block, colourless Cylinder, colourless Plate, colourless
Crystal size (mm) 0.70 × 0.50 × 0.36 0.30 × 0.30 × 0.18 1.00 × 0.38 × 0.38 0.30 × 0.30 × 0.18
         
Data collection
Diffractometer Bruker SMART Bruker SMART Bruker SMART Bruker SMART
Data collection method ω scans ω scans ω scans ω scans
Absorption correction Multi-scan (based on symmetry-related measurements) Multi-scan (based on symmetry-related measurements) Multi-scan (based on symmetry-related measurements) Multi-scan (based on symmetry-related measurements)
Tmin 0.49 0.68 0.575 0.96
Tmax 0.82 0.91 1.000 0.98
No. of measured, independent and observed reflections 7449, 2843, 2219 7359, 711, 397 7505, 1957, 1302 3070, 469, 261
Criterion for observed reflections I > 2σ(I) I > 2σ(I) I > 2σ(I) I > 2σ(I)
Rint 0.016 0.063 0.021 0.099
θmax (°) 28.9 23.2 28.7 23.3
Range of h, k, l −4 → h → 5 −4 → h → 4 −22 → h → 22 0 → h → 6
  −14 → k → 17 0 → k → 14 −10 → k → 11 0 → k → 5
  −31 → l → 29 0 → l → 10 −15 → l → 15 0 → l → 19
         
Refinement
Refinement on F2 F2 F2 F2
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)], wR(F2), S 0.043, 0.110, 0.75 0.055, 0.160, 1.03 0.056, 0.111, 1.07 0.083, 0.251, 0.94
No. of reflections 2843 710 1956 461
No. of parameters 151 61 125 62
H-atom treatment Mixture of independent and constrained refinement Not refined Mixture of independent and constrained refinement Not refined
Weighting scheme w = 1/[σ2(F2) + (P(1)p)2 + P(2)p + P(4) + P(5)sin θ]; P(i) are: 0.700E−1, 0.890, 0.00, 0.00, 0.00, 0.333 w = 1/[σ2(F2) + (P(1)p)2 + P(2)p + P(4) + P(5)sin θ]; P(i) are: 0.625E−1, 1.91, 0.00, 0.00, 0.00, 0.333 w = 1/[σ2(F2) + (P(1)p)2 + P(2)p + P(4) + P(5)sin θ]; P(i) are: 0.172E−1, 1.34, 0.00, 0.00, 0.00, 0.333 w = 1/[σ2(F2) + (P(1)p)2 + P(2)p + P(4) + P(5)sin θ]; P(i) are: 0.173, 0.00, 0.00, 0.00, 0.00, 0.333
(Δ/σ)max 0.001 0.007 <0.0001 0.001
Δρmax, Δρmin (e Å−3) 0.44, −0.44 0.21, −0.20 0.32, −0.40 0.27, −0.20
Extinction method None None Larson (1970[Larson, A. C. (1970). Crystallogr. Comput. Proc. Int. Summer Sch. pp. 291-294.]) None
Extinction coefficient 29 (9)

A new crystal was grown as above and then maintained at high temperature during data collection with the variable-temperature device set at 403 K. This is a nominal temperature, as there was presumably a significant temperature gradient across the cell as a whole, although across the sample itself the variation in temperature would have been small. The high-temperature dataset indexed on a slightly smaller orthorhombic unit cell with the following dimensions: a = 5.7168 (7), b = 9.9997 (19), c = 17.868 (2) Å. Both the b and c axes show a large change in length compared with the ambient temperature/0.36 GPa cell given above (Δb = +0.95 Å; Δc = −1.41 Å). This cell is also different from that obtained at low temperature (Table 1[link]).

Conventional direct methods applied to the 403 K data set failed to yield a recognisable solution. This is a recurrent problem in high-pressure crystallography and is the result of low data-completeness. The problem can be overcome by using global optimization methods, originally devised for structure solution from powders. The crystal structure of 2-fluorophenol at high pressure was therefore solved using the simulated annealing procedure in the program DASH (David et al., 2001[David, W. I. F., Shankland, K., Cole, J., Maginn, S., Motherwell, W. D. S. & Taylor, R. (2001). DASH User's Manual. Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre, Cambridge, UK.]). The refinement of the structure followed the procedures outlined in §2.5[link].

2.7. Recovery of 4-chlorophenol grown at high pressure

The high melting point of 4-chlorophenol allowed the crystals of phase II formed at high pressure to be recovered without the sample melting. On release of the pressure the sample remained as a single crystal with a slight reduction in size due to melting around the edges. Diffraction data were collected at ambient pressure and 293 K, which showed the crystal to be 4-chlorophenol Phase I (see Table 1[link]).

2.8. Software and other general procedures

A consistent numbering scheme was used for all the structures described here and this is shown in (I)[link]. Where there is

[Scheme 1]
more than one molecule in the asymmetric unit the labels are augmented with the numbers 1, 2 etc. A full listing of crystal, data collection and refinement parameters is given in Table 1[link], and a set of hydrogen-bonding parameters is given in Table 2[link]. The structures were visualized using SHELXTL (Sheldrick, 2001[Sheldrick, G. M. (2001). SHELXTL, Version 6.01. University of Göttingen, Germany and Bruker-Nonius Inc., Madison, Wisconsin, USA.]), MERCURY (Bruno et al., 2002[Bruno, I. J., Cole, J. C., Edgington, P. R., Kessler, M., Macrae, C. F., McCabe, P., Pearson, J. & Taylor, R. (2002). Acta Cryst. B58, 389-397.]) or CAMERON (Watkin et al., 1993[Watkin, D. J., Pearce, L. & Prout, C. K. (1993). CAMERON. Chemical Crystallography Laboratory, University of Oxford, England.]); the figures were produced using DIAMOND (Crystal Impact, 2004[Crystal Impact (2004). DIAMOND, Version 3a. Crystal Impact, Postfach 1251, 53002 Bonn, Germany; http://www.crystalimpact.com/diamond .]). Other analyses utilized the p.c. version of PLATON (Spek, 2002[Spek, A. L. (2002). PLATON. Utrecht University, The Netherlands.]; Farrugia, 1999[Farrugia, L. J. (1999). J. Appl. Cryst. 32, 837-838.]). Searches of the Cambridge Structural Database (Allen, 2002[Allen, F. H. (2002). Acta Cryst. B58, 380-388.]; Allen & Motherwell, 2002[Allen, F. H. & Motherwell, W. D. S. (2002). Acta Cryst. B58, 407-422.]) were carried out with the program CONQUEST, utilizing Version 5.25 of the database. Calculations involving projected vectors followed the methods of Sands (1995[Sands, D. E. (1995). Vectors and Tensors in Crystallography, ch. 2. New York: Dover.]). Crystallographic information files for all structures reported here are available as supplementary material.1

Table 2
Hydrogen-bonding parameters (Å)

The hydrogen-bonding distances are from donor to acceptor due to the imprecise determination of H-atom positions. H⋯Cl and H⋯F distances are given before and after the normalization of C—H distances to typical neutron values (1.083 Å), the latter being given in square brackets. The high-pressure crystal structure of 2-fluorophenol was determined at 403 K.

      DA distance (Å)
Compound Donor Acceptor Low-temperature (150 K) High pressure
3-F O7 O7i 2.819 (1) 2.843 (8)
  H6 F8ii 2.61 [2.48] 2.62 [2.49]
3-Cl O71 O72iii 2.734 (7) 2.693 (4)
  O72 O71 2.700 (6) 2.753 (4)
4-Cl phase I O71 O72iv 2.767 (2)
  O72 O71 2.779 (2)
  H62 Cl81v 2.93 [2.82]
  H21 Cl82vi 2.93 [2.82]
4-Cl phase II O71 O72 2.762 (2) 2.819 (5)
  O72 O71vii 2.779 (2) 2.749 (5)
  H31 Cl82viii 2.83 [2.73] 2.85 [2.75]
2-F phase I O71 O71ix 2.774 (3)
  O71 O72 2.707 (2)
  O71 F81 2.690 (2)
  O71 F81ix 2.942 (2)
2-F phase II O71 O72x 2.861 (7)
  O72 O71   3.097 (8)
  F81 H62xi   2.56 [2.46]
  F82 H61xii   2.56 [2.49]
  F82 H52xiii   2.63 [2.53]
  O71 F82   2.941(7)
Symmetry codes: (i) [-x, {1\over 2}+y, -z]; (ii) 1+x, 1+y, z; (iii) [x-{1\over 2}, -{1\over 2}-y, -2-z]; (iv) [x, {3\over 2}-y, {1\over 2}+z]; (v) [2-x, y-{1\over 2}, -{1\over 2}-z]; (vi) 1+x, y, z; (vii) 2-x, 1-y, 1-z; (viii) 1-x, 2-y, 1-z; (ix) 1-x, -y, 1-z; (x) [{1\over 2}+x, {1\over 2}-y,1-z]; (xi) [-{1\over 2}+x, {1\over 2}-y,1-z]; (xii) -1+x,y,z; (xiii) [-x, {1\over 2}+y, {3\over 2}-z].

3. Results

3.1. 3-Fluorophenol

3-Fluorophenol crystallizes at 263 K in the space group P21 with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected at 150 K. The molecules interact via ⋯OH⋯OH⋯ hydrogen bonds to form chains disposed about the crystallographic 21 screw axes, conforming to a C(2) graph set (Fig. 2[link]a). This packing motif is more commonly associated with small alcohols and was quite unexpected. It appears that stabilization of this motif occurs through the formation of H6⋯F8 interactions (2.61 Å) between the chains (Fig. 2[link]b). Taken on their own these C—H⋯F interactions form chains which run along the 〈110〉 directions. The OH⋯O hydrogen bond present in this system is slightly longer [O7⋯O7′ 2.819 (1) Å] than those present in the other systems described in this paper. In projection onto (010) each chain is surrounded by six others.

[Figure 2]
Figure 2
(a) Crystal structure of 3-fluorophenol at 150 K viewed down the a axis. 3-Fluorophenol crystallizes with one molecule in the asymmetric unit in the space group P21, thereby forming a chain motif adopted by smaller alcohols. (b) Close contacts formed between H6⋯F8 of different chains (these contacts are omitted in Fig. 2[link]a for clarity). Colour scheme: C black, F sea green, H light turquoise, O red.

The same phase is obtained on crystallization at 0.12 GPa. Neither the hydrogen bond nor the stabilizing C—H⋯F interaction are significantly different to those in the low-temperature structure [O7⋯O7′ 2.843 (8) Å; H6⋯F8 2.62 Å].

3.2. 3-Chlorophenol

3-Chlorophenol is a liquid under ambient pressure with a melting point of 306 K. At 283 K it crystallizes in space group P212121 with two molecules in the asymmetric unit; diffraction data were collected at 150 K. Primary bond distances and angles are normal, and are available as supplementary material . The molecules interact via ⋯OH⋯OH⋯ hydrogen bonds to form pseudo-fourfold helical chains (Fig. 3[link]a). The two crystallographically independent molecules alternate along the chains. The angle between successive C11—O71 and C12—O72 vectors in the chain when projected onto the (100) plane is 89.75°; in a perfect fourfold helix this value would be 90°. While the departure from projected fourfold symmetry in the OH⋯OH⋯ interaction is slight, the orientations of the chloro groups do not conform to the pseudo-symmetry – the angle between Cl–C vectors projected onto (100) is 17.74°. In addition, the molecules are not regularly spaced along the helix; the separations between the O atoms in the a direction are 0.44 or 1.55 Å (Fig. 3[link]b).

[Figure 3]
Figure 3
(a) Crystal structure of 3-chlorophenol at 150 K. Distorted pseudo-fourfold helices are formed through OH⋯OH hydrogen bonds between the two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure at high pressure (0.1 GPa) is similar to the low-temperature structure. (b) Although in projection on (100), the positions of the C—O bonds resemble those in a fourfold helix and the positions of the molecules along the axis of the helix are irregular. Colour scheme as in Fig. 1[link].

The chains conform to a C22(4) graph set and are disposed about the 21 axes parallel to the a-axis direction (Fig. 3[link]a). The two crystallographically independent hydrogen bonds are moderate in strength: O71⋯O72 2.734 (7) and O72⋯O71 2.700 (6) Å (Table 2[link]). The chains appear to be close-packed when viewed in projection onto (100) and, in contrast to the fluoro derivative, there are no contacts between the chains that fall within the sums of the van der Waals radii.

Crystallization at 0.1 GPa results in the same structure as that at ambient pressure. The interactions between molecules are significantly different to those at ambient pressure [O71⋯O72 2.693 (4), O72⋯O71 2.753 (4) Å]. The interaction between O71⋯O72 appears to decrease in length at pressure while O72⋯O71 increases, although it is not possible to differentiate between the effects of pressure and temperature since the ambient pressure structure was determined at 150 K, while the high-pressure determination was at room temperature.

3.3. 4-Chlorophenol phase I at 150 K

4-Chlorophenol is a solid at room temperature and was characterized by Perrin & Michel (1973a[Perrin, P. M. & Michel, P. (1973a). Acta Cryst. B29, 253-258.], b[Perrin, P. M. & Michel, P. (1973b). Acta Cryst. B29, 258-263.]). It crystallizes in two polymorphic forms and the structures of these have been redetermined at 150 K as part of this study.

Phase I crystallizes from the melt at ambient pressure in the space group P21/c with two molecules in the asymmetric unit; it is the more stable of the two phases. The two independent molecules alternate along the c direction, forming OH⋯OH⋯ hydrogen bonds resulting in a C22(4) graph set (Fig. 4[link]a). The hydrogen bonds formed in this structure are of similar length: O71⋯O72 2.767 (2) and O72⋯O71 2.779 (2) Å.

[Figure 4]
Figure 4
(a) Crystal structure of phase I of 4-chlorophenol at 150 K viewed along the b axis, showing chains of molecules linked by OH⋯OH hydrogen bonds. (b) View down [001], along the chains. The Cl⋯H interactions occur between Cl82⋯H21 and Cl81⋯H62; the latter lie parallel to the b axis and run into the page. Colour scheme as in Fig. 1[link].

The graph-set descriptor is the same as that in 3-chloro­phenol, but the chain is built by successive application of c-glide operations rather than a screw axis. Although the chain is helical, with a repeat at every fourth molecule, the pseudo-fourfold symmetry is even less ideal than in 3-chlorophenol (Fig. 4[link]b). The angle between O71—C11 and O72—C12 when projected onto (010) is 133.17°, which compares with 89.75° in 3-chlorophenol. Moreover, the spacing of molecules along the direction of the helix is irregular: the spacings of the O atoms in the c direction are 1.98 and 2.39 Å.

The chains are linked by H21⋯Cl82 and H62⋯Cl81 interactions, both measuring 2.93 Å (Fig. 4[link]b). Taken on their own these C—Cl⋯H interactions build spiral chains which are disposed about the 21 axis parallel to b. Neighbouring chains interact with one another through a π-stacking interaction between pairs of symmetry-equivalent molecules containing C11—Cl81. The distance between the phenyl ring planes is 3.45 Å with the centroids separated by 3.77 Å, which equates to a 1.74 Å centroid displacement.

3.4. 4-Chlorophenol phase II at 150 K and 0.02 GPa

The second phase of 4-chlorophenol is obtained by recrystallization from benzene; it is in the same space group as phase I, P21/c, with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Phase II is metastable and transforms spontaneously to phase I if placed in contact with it (Perrin & Michel, 1973b[Perrin, P. M. & Michel, P. (1973b). Acta Cryst. B29, 258-263.]).

As in phase I, the molecules interact via ⋯OH⋯OH⋯ hydrogen bonds, but the interactions form an R44(8) graph set rather than hydrogen-bonded chains (Fig. 5[link]). These rings stack along the a direction. The hydrogen bonds are of a similar length to those in phase I; O71⋯O72 2.762 (2) and O72⋯O71 2.779 (2) Å. Within the R44(8) rings a secondary CH⋯π interaction is formed between H21 and the π-system of molecule 2 (comprising atoms C12–C62). The H21⋯ π-centroid is 3.95 Å, near to the limit for these interactions (4 Å) as defined by Malone et al. (1997[Malone, J. F., Murray, C. M., Charlton, M. H., Docherty, R. & Lavery, A. J. (1997). J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 93, 3429-3436.]), and it adopts a `Type V' motif, as defined by the same authors.

[Figure 5]
Figure 5
Crystal structure of phase II of 4-chlorophenol at 150 K viewed along the a axis. The molecules crystallize in a ring motif that forms around an approximate fourfold axis. The discrete hydrogen-bonded groups are linked through an interaction between Cl82⋯H31. The structure at high pressure is similar to the low-temperature structure. Colour scheme as in Fig. 1[link].

There are close contacts between Cl and H atoms (Cl82⋯H31 2.83 Å cf. sum of van der Waals' 2.95 Å) that join the R44(8) groups together into a ribbon. The ribbons lie along the [110] direction at c = ½ and the [[\bar 1]10] direction at c = 0, 1 etc.

Under ambient conditions crystallization of 4-chlorophenol from the melt yields phase I, but when crystallized from the melt under pressure (0.02 GPa), phase II is formed. This pressure is very slight indeed by the standards of high-pressure crystallography and is barely measurable using the ruby fluorescence technique. The molecular arrangement is the same as the ambient pressure structure, although O71⋯O72 is significantly longer than at ambient pressure [2.819 (5) Å], while O72⋯O71 is significantly shorter [2.749 (5) Å]. A similar effect was observed in 3-chlorophenol.

The crystal of phase II grown at high pressure transformed to a single crystal of phase I when the pressure was released, but this transformation is not reversible, i.e. applying hydrostatic pressure to a crystal of phase I does not yield phase II. It is possible that the phase II-to-I transformation occurs by conversion of the R44(8) ring motifs, which are stacked by lattice repeats along the a direction in phase I, into C44(8) chains, developed by a c glide, in phase II. Such a change in the intermolecular interactions would approximately double the length of the lattice repeat in the a direction in going from phase I to II (a = 3.97 and c = 8.74 Å in phases I and II, respectively). In both phases C—Cl⋯H interactions build chains which spiral along the 21-axes along the b directions. These similarities presumably promote the preservation of the single crystal through the phase transition.

3.5. 2-Fluorophenol phase I at 150 K

2-Fluorophenol crystallizes in space group C2/c with one-and-a-half molecules in the asymmetric unit. We refer to this phase as phase I. One molecule (molecule 1, C11–F81) occupies a general position and is ordered. A second molecule (molecule 2, C12–F82) occupies a twofold axis with the axis running through atoms O72⋯C12⋯C42, and so the hydroxyl hydrogen and the F atoms are disordered.

The molecules interact via ⋯OH⋯OH⋯ hydrogen bonds forming chains; the direction of the hydrogen bonding in these chains must be disordered as a result of the disorder in molecule 2. A pair of molecules of type 1 are connected by a hydrogen bond formed across an inversion centre. These `dimer' sub-units are then bridged by disordered molecules of type 2 (Fig. 6[link]a). When projected along a the chains have a marked zigzag structure. When viewed in projection along c the chain of molecules somewhat resembles a helix, but the resemblance is an artefact of the projection: the displacement along c of one molecule to another is quite irregular, being 2.18 Å across the inversion centre and 5.75 Å across the twofold axis, while the angles made between successive OC vectors alternate between 180 and 89.83° (Fig. 6[link]b). The hydrogen-bond lengths are similar to those observed for other compounds in the study: O71⋯O71 2.774 (3) and O71⋯O72 2.707 (2) Å. There are π-stacking interactions between molecule 1 and a symmetry equivalent in the next chain along the a axis. The phenyl rings lie parallel to one another 3.62 Å apart with a centroid displacement in the plane of the ring of 1.48 Å.

[Figure 6]
Figure 6
(a) Crystal structure of phase I of 2-fluorophenol at 150 K showing the disordered hydrogen-bonded chain. Molecule 1 forms a dimer with a symmetry-equivalent molecule. These dimers are linked through a hydrogen-bonding interaction to molecule 2. H atoms are omitted for clarity. F82 is disordered by the twofold axis which runs through O72—C12. (b) View down the hydrogen-bonded chain. Colour scheme as in Fig. 2[link].

3.6. 2-Fluorophenol phase II at 0.36 GPa and 403 K

A crystal of 2-fluorophenol was grown at 0.36 GPa, but the crystal fractured a few hours after cooling to ambient temperature. Despite the poor X-ray diffraction data, the diffraction pattern could be indexed on an orthorhombic unit cell (a = 5.8952, b = 10.9466, c = 16.459 Å); this is different to that determined at ambient pressure at 150 K, indicating that a different phase had formed under high pressure. A tentative structural solution was obtained, but the refinement residuals were unacceptably high and it is likely that on cooling to room temperature the compound forms a disordered phase.

We found that the crystal obtained at high pressure was stable if the cell was held above ca 363 K and so a data collection was carried out in which the cell was held at 403 K. This phase of 2-fluorophenol crystallizes in the space group P212121 with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. In one molecule the C—F bond refined to an unrealistically short distance, which may indicate high librational disorder of the molecule. This is not unreasonable for a structure at 403 K, although it is difficult to assess from the displacement parameters because of the low data completeness which resulted from shading by the pressure cell.

Oxygen and fluorine have similar X-ray scattering factors and so assignment of these sites was made on the basis of interatomic contacts. The assumption that O atoms are likely to make at least one hydrogen bond in which the distance between the non-H atoms is between 2.6 and 3.1 Å serves to identify O71 as an oxygen atom. The shortest contact (3.37 Å) made by F81 is to C62 in a neighbouring ring; this distance is similar to those quoted by Thalladi et al. (1998[Thalladi, V. R., Weiss, H.-C., Blaser, D., Boese, R., Nangia, A. & Desiraju, G. R. (1998). J. Am. Chem. Soc. 120, 8702-8710.]) for C⋯F distances in C—H⋯F hydrogen bonds, which therefore lends support to the assignment.

Atom assignments, O72 and F82, in the second of the two independent molecules were made by the refinement of two alternative models with part-weight hydroxyl H atoms placed in two alternative positions on each O atom. The R1 factors for the model presented here and the alternative were 0.121 and 0.124, respectively. The occupancies of alternative H-atom positions refined to 0.85:0.15 (13); only the H atoms of major occupancy were retained. The alternative model contains OH⋯F interactions; organic fluorine is not expected to be competitive with hydroxyl oxygen as a hydrogen-bond acceptor.

The OH⋯OH⋯ chain that is formed (along the a direction) conforms to a C22(4) graph set. The O71⋯O72 distances are 2.861 (7) and 3.097 (8) Å. In common with other structures in this series, each chain is surrounded by six others and there are F82⋯H52 interactions formed between the chains (2.63 Å, Fig. 7[link]a). The O⋯O distance of 3.097 (8) Å is the longest observed for an OH⋯OH interaction in this series and the length of the interaction may reflect the steric effect of F72 [O71⋯F72 2.941 (7) Å]. This arrangement is stabilized by secondary F81⋯H62 and F82⋯F61 interactions (both 2.56 Å) formed within the chains (Fig. 7[link]b).

[Figure 7]
Figure 7
(a) Crystal structure of phase II of 2-fluorophenol at 0.36 GPa viewed along a showing chains of molecules linked by OH⋯OH hydrogen bonds. The chains are linked by C—H⋯F hydrogen bonds between H52 and F82. (b) The hydrogen-bonded chains viewed side-on. Colour scheme as in Fig. 2[link].

4. Discussion

Compounds that are crystallized under ambient conditions and then subjected as single crystals to high pressure may be reduced to powder during a phase transition. Low-melting compounds are therefore useful for the study of pressure-induced polymorphism because high-pressure phases can be accessed directly by in situ crystallization in a high-pressure cell. A particularly striking example of the simplification in phase behaviour that can be gained by in situ crystallization is that of S8: the solid-region temperature/pressure phase diagram contains no less than 12 different phases when studied by compression of a solid sample, but there are only three when the liquid is allowed to crystallize from the melt (Mezouar, 2001[Mezouar, M. (2001). High Pressure Powder Diffraction Using Synchrotron Radiation. British Crystallographic Association Physical Crystallography Group Meeting, Darebury Laboratory, Warrington, UK. November 2001.]). The series of molecules reported herein was chosen for its well defined hydrogen-bonding characteristics and the rigidity of the molecules.

We have described the structures of 2-chlorophenol and 4-fluorophenol in a previous paper (Oswald et al., 2005[Oswald, I. D. H., Allan, D. R., Day, G. M, Motherwell, W. D. S. & Parsons, S. (2005). Accepted for publication.]) and the aim of this paper is to complete our survey of the monofluoro- and monochlorophenols.

The packing in the crystal structures of monoalcohols has been studied by Brock & Duncan (1994[Brock, C. P. & Duncan, L. L. (1994). Chem. Mater. 6, 1307-1312.]) and Taylor & Macrae (2001[Taylor, R. & Macrae, C. F. (2001). Acta Cryst. B57, 815-827.]). Alcohols with bulky R groups aggregate around three-, four- or sixfold screw, rotation or rotoinversion axes or crystallize in low-symmetry space groups with Z′ > 1. Small alcohols tend to pack about 21 axes or glide planes. Our previous work has shown that phenol, 2-chlorophenol and 4-fluoro­phenol behave like bulky alcohols at low temperature (packing about a pseudo-threefold axis in P21, a 32 axis in P32 or a [\bar 3] site in R[\bar 3], respectively), but behave as small alcohols, packing about 21 axes or glide planes, at high pressure.

3-Chlorophenol behaves typically, and packs with two independent molecules about a 21 axis to emulate a fourfold screw axis, although there are significant departures from this ideal arrangement. This structure is obtained both at low-temperature (283 K) and high pressure (0.1 GPa). The geometric parameters characterizing the packing were slightly different. All or most of the interactions would be expected to decrease in length on further application of pressure, but one disadvantage of the methods used here is that hydrostatic conditions are lost on crystallization under pressure (the liquid behaves as its own hydrostatic fluid). Increasing the pressure on such samples therefore tends to degrade them.

3-Fluorophenol is unique in this series of compounds in crystallizing at ambient pressure like a small alcohol and forming chains disposed about a 21 screw axis. The O⋯O distances in the chain are slightly longer than in the other phenols studied here and this may reflect steric effects in neighbouring phenyl groups. The structure is stabilized by F⋯H interactions. The same phase is obtained on crystallization at 0.12 GPa.

Both 2-fluorophenol and 4-chlorophenol exhibit more interesting phase behaviour with increasing pressure. Neither adopts the packing motif associated with small alcohols at high pressure; nor do they form very regular helical structures at ambient pressure.

The structure of 2-fluorophenol phase I at 150 K is depicted in Fig. 6[link]. The packing is characterized by chains built by OH⋯OH⋯ hydrogen bonds. Pairs of molecules are linked across inversion centres; each pair is bridged by molecules disordered about twofold axes. The pairs of molecules connected across the inversion centres have a similar spatial relationship to a pair of molecules related by a glide plane or 21 axis, as in the structures of small alcohols. The steric effect of the 2-fluorine atom means that this relationship cannot be propagated further and the other molecules in the chain are rotated about the chain axis (the c direction) by ca 90°. The 2-fluorine atoms point towards the chain axis and there is no scope for the formation of stabilizing F⋯H contacts either within the chains or between them.

A different polymorph (phase II) was obtained for 2-fluorophenol at 0.36 GPa. The crystal of this phase was stable only above ca 363 K and data were obtained at 403 K. The structure has two molecules in the asymmetric unit and is also characterized by OH⋯OH⋯ chain formation. In projection the chain resembles a fourfold helix, but the repeat along the chain is irregular. The most important difference between this phase and phase I is the presence of F⋯H interactions which occur both within the hydrogen-bonded chains and between them. Thalladi et al. (1998[Thalladi, V. R., Weiss, H.-C., Blaser, D., Boese, R., Nangia, A. & Desiraju, G. R. (1998). J. Am. Chem. Soc. 120, 8702-8710.]) have shown that the C—H⋯F interactions are as important as C—H⋯O interactions in structure stabilization. The observation that more of these weak interactions are formed at high pressure is consistent with results observed in other high-pressure studies, for example, on glycine, where high-pressure induces extensive CH⋯O hydrogen-bond formation (Dawson et al., 2005[Dawson, A., Allan, D. R., Belmonte, S. A., Clark, S. J., David, W. I. F., McGregor, P. A., Parsons, S., Pulham, C. R. & Sawyer, L. (2005). Accepted for publication.]). A feature exhibited by the high-pressure structures of 2-chlorophenol and 4-fluorophenol is the lengthening of OH⋯OH⋯ hydrogen bonds in order to accommodate more efficient packing motifs. A similar feature is observed in phase II of 2-fluorophenol, in which one O⋯O interaction is 3.097 (3) Å.

The two phases of 4-chlorophenol presented here have been described previously and these structures are redeterminations. Phase I, which is based on an irregular helical arrangement of molecules linked by OH⋯OH interactions, crystallizes at ambient pressure from the melt. Under a modest pressure of 0.02 GPa, crystallization from the melt yields phase II, which is based on cyclic hydrogen-bonded tetramers. In both phases the Cl atoms link the hydrogen-bonded units together through C—Cl⋯H interactions. These are somewhat shorter in phase II than in phase I. Moreover, the R44(8) ring has inversion symmetry rather than the [\bar 4] symmetry that might be expected for such a motif for a bulky alcohol. Neighbouring phenyl groups approach each other with centroid–centroid distances of 6.22 Å, mediated by a CH⋯aryl hydrogen bond. The more extensive set of contacts in phase II and its more efficient packing of phenyl groups perhaps explains the preference for this phase at high pressure.

5. Conclusions

The behaviour of the 3-chloro, 3-fluoro-, 4-chloro- and 2-fluorophenol show a departure from the behaviour observed in phenol, 2-chlorophenol and 4-fluorophenol. The transition to a small alcohol packing from bulky alcohol packing is not seen in any of the former compounds. In general, we find that they crystallize in pseudo-helices and ring motifs, although these are markedly distorted from three- or fourfold symmetry often observed in alcohol structures. Only one compound, 2-fluorophenol, shows a phase that is only stable at high pressure. Those compounds that do undergo a phase transition, 4-chlorophenol and 2-fluorophenol, show a transition to a phase which possesses a greater number of weaker intermolecular contacts in the form of CH⋯π and C—H⋯F interactions, respectively.

Supporting information


Comment top

063_ALERT_3_B Crystal Probably too Large for Beam Size ······. 1.00 mm

This crystal was grown by laser (see text) in a capilliary. It was very difficult to the precise length of the crystal grown. Gorbitz has shown that use of a large crystal does not appear to affect data quality. See C. H. Gorbitz Acta Cryst. (1999). B55, 1090–1098

032_ALERT_4_C Std Uncertainty in Flack Parameter too High ···. 3.00 850_ALERT_2_C Check Flack Parameter Exact Value 0.00 and su.. 3.00

This crystal does not contain any elements that would contribute significantly to anomalous scattering therefore the Flack parameter is undetermined.

061_ALERT_3_C Tmax/Tmin Range Test RR' too Large ············. 0.76

This long sample is inclined at 54 ° in chi and absorption will be quite significant as the sample passes beneath the collimator. Note that the capillary will contribute to the transmission factors also.

The glass caillary will contribute to the transmission factors also.

125_ALERT_4_C No _symmetry_space_group_name_Hall Given ······. ? 790_ALERT_4_C Centre of Gravity not Within Unit Cell: Resd. # 1 C6 H5 F O

Noted; no action taken.

Computing details top

For all compounds, data collection: SMART (Siemens, 1993); cell refinement: SAINT (Siemens ,1995); data reduction: SAINT (Siemens ,1995). Program(s) used to solve structure: SHELXS 86 (Sheldrick, 1986) for (3F); SIR92 for 3FP; USER DEFINED STRUCTURE SOLUTION for 3CL, 3CLP, 4CL2P, 2F1; SIR92 (Altomare et al., 1994) for 4CL1, 4CL2; DASH for 2F2P. For all compounds, program(s) used to refine structure: CRYSTALS (Betteridge et al. 2003); molecular graphics: CAMERON (Watkin et al. 1996); software used to prepare material for publication: CRYSTALS (Betteridge et al. 2003).

Figures top
[Figure 1]
[Figure 2]
[Figure 3]
[Figure 4]
[Figure 5]
[Figure 6]
[Figure 7]
(3F) top
Crystal data top
C6H5FOF(000) = 116
Mr = 112.10Dx = 1.464 Mg m3
Monoclinic, P21Mo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
a = 5.6510 (12) ÅCell parameters from 711 reflections
b = 5.0642 (10) Åθ = 2–28°
c = 9.3185 (19) ŵ = 0.12 mm1
β = 107.518 (4)°T = 150 K
V = 254.31 (9) Å3Cylinder, colourless
Z = 21.00 × 0.32 × 0.32 mm
Data collection top
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
608 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.014
ω scansθmax = 28.6°, θmin = 2.3°
Absorption correction: multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
h = 67
Tmin = 0.67, Tmax = 0.96k = 66
1603 measured reflectionsl = 129
672 independent reflections
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Hydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
Least-squares matrix: fullH atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.037 P = P(6)*max(Fo2,0) + (1-P(6))Fc2 Method = SHELXL 97 (Sheldrick, 1997) W = 1. / [Sigma2(F2) + (P(1)p)2 + P(2)p + P(4) + P(5)Sin(theta)] P(i) are: 0.553E-01 0.625E-03 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.333
wR(F2) = 0.092(Δ/σ)max = 0.000153
S = 1.05Δρmax = 0.22 e Å3
672 reflectionsΔρmin = 0.22 e Å3
77 parametersAbsolute structure: Flack, 0 Friedel-pairs
1 restraintAbsolute structure parameter: 0 (3)
Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methods
Crystal data top
C6H5FOV = 254.31 (9) Å3
Mr = 112.10Z = 2
Monoclinic, P21Mo Kα radiation
a = 5.6510 (12) ŵ = 0.12 mm1
b = 5.0642 (10) ÅT = 150 K
c = 9.3185 (19) Å1.00 × 0.32 × 0.32 mm
β = 107.518 (4)°
Data collection top
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
672 independent reflections
Absorption correction: multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
608 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Tmin = 0.67, Tmax = 0.96Rint = 0.014
1603 measured reflections
Refinement top
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.037H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
wR(F2) = 0.092Δρmax = 0.22 e Å3
S = 1.05Δρmin = 0.22 e Å3
672 reflectionsAbsolute structure: Flack, 0 Friedel-pairs
77 parametersAbsolute structure parameter: 0 (3)
1 restraint
Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
C10.2972 (3)0.3568 (5)0.1685 (2)0.0213
C20.4652 (4)0.5476 (6)0.1529 (2)0.0246
C30.6955 (3)0.5503 (5)0.2601 (2)0.0247
C40.7650 (3)0.3756 (6)0.3785 (2)0.0275
C50.5942 (4)0.1887 (6)0.3904 (2)0.0281
C60.3595 (4)0.1777 (5)0.2865 (2)0.0247
O70.0640 (3)0.3371 (4)0.06698 (18)0.0289
F80.8607 (2)0.7366 (7)0.24734 (16)0.0374
H70.026 (7)0.469 (9)0.023 (4)0.0500*
H20.42330.67050.07210.0299*
H40.92540.38340.44980.0314*
H50.63780.06560.47100.0326*
H60.24290.04910.29620.0298*
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
C10.0213 (9)0.0191 (11)0.0226 (9)0.0032 (10)0.0051 (8)0.0047 (10)
C20.0297 (10)0.0202 (11)0.0245 (10)0.0009 (9)0.0093 (8)0.0011 (9)
C30.0234 (9)0.0207 (11)0.0327 (12)0.0048 (10)0.0123 (9)0.0078 (11)
C40.0188 (8)0.0293 (13)0.0301 (10)0.0018 (10)0.0010 (8)0.0045 (11)
C50.0281 (10)0.0255 (13)0.0276 (11)0.0052 (11)0.0039 (9)0.0031 (10)
C60.0249 (9)0.0181 (12)0.0310 (11)0.0025 (9)0.0083 (9)0.0011 (9)
O70.0262 (7)0.0242 (9)0.0287 (8)0.0021 (7)0.0033 (6)0.0002 (8)
F80.0334 (7)0.0313 (8)0.0488 (8)0.0138 (6)0.0146 (6)0.0047 (7)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
C1—C21.392 (3)C4—C51.380 (3)
C1—C61.387 (3)C4—H40.950
C1—O71.375 (2)C5—C61.388 (3)
C2—C31.382 (3)C5—H50.950
C2—H20.950C6—H60.950
C3—C41.376 (3)O7—H70.78 (4)
C3—F81.358 (4)
C2—C1—C6121.21 (17)C3—C4—H4121.073
C2—C1—O7121.4 (2)C5—C4—H4121.061
C6—C1—O7117.4 (2)C4—C5—C6121.1 (2)
C1—C2—C3117.1 (2)C4—C5—H5119.489
C1—C2—H2121.456C6—C5—H5119.422
C3—C2—H2121.493C5—C6—C1119.22 (19)
C2—C3—C4123.56 (19)C5—C6—H6120.390
C2—C3—F8117.8 (2)C1—C6—H6120.387
C4—C3—F8118.65 (19)C1—O7—H7111 (3)
C3—C4—C5117.87 (18)
(3FP) top
Crystal data top
C6H5FOF(000) = 116
Mr = 112.10Dx = 1.433 Mg m3
Monoclinic, P21Mo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
a = 5.6747 (9) ÅCell parameters from 398 reflections
b = 5.0760 (4) Åθ = 5–23°
c = 9.4753 (13) ŵ = 0.12 mm1
β = 107.832 (11)°T = 293 K
V = 259.82 (6) Å3Blocks, colourless
Z = 20.30 × 0.30 × 0.18 mm
Data collection top
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
146 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.041
ω scansθmax = 23.2°, θmin = 4.5°
Absorption correction: multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
h = 12
Tmin = 0.67, Tmax = 0.98k = 50
1310 measured reflectionsl = 100
159 independent reflections
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Hydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
Least-squares matrix: fullH-atom parameters not refined
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.064 P = P(6)*max(Fo2,0) + (1-P(6))Fc2 Method = SHELXL 97 (Sheldrick, 1997) W = 1. / [Sigma2(F2) + (P(1)p)2 + P(2)p + P(4) + P(5)Sin(theta)] P(i) are: 0.694E-01 0.349 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.333
wR(F2) = 0.160(Δ/σ)max = 0.000023
S = 1.15Δρmax = 0.17 e Å3
159 reflectionsΔρmin = 0.16 e Å3
32 parametersAbsolute structure: Flack, 0 Friedel-pairs
15 restraintsAbsolute structure parameter: 11 (7)
Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methods
Crystal data top
C6H5FOV = 259.82 (6) Å3
Mr = 112.10Z = 2
Monoclinic, P21Mo Kα radiation
a = 5.6747 (9) ŵ = 0.12 mm1
b = 5.0760 (4) ÅT = 293 K
c = 9.4753 (13) Å0.30 × 0.30 × 0.18 mm
β = 107.832 (11)°
Data collection top
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
159 independent reflections
Absorption correction: multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
146 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Tmin = 0.67, Tmax = 0.98Rint = 0.041
1310 measured reflectionsθmax = 23.2°
Refinement top
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.064H-atom parameters not refined
wR(F2) = 0.160Δρmax = 0.17 e Å3
S = 1.15Δρmin = 0.16 e Å3
159 reflectionsAbsolute structure: Flack, 0 Friedel-pairs
32 parametersAbsolute structure parameter: 11 (7)
15 restraints
Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
O70.070 (3)0.3345 (11)0.0673 (7)0.0611
F80.863 (3)0.7372 (9)0.2468 (6)0.0734
H70.02520.46430.02490.0500*
C10.29850.35410.16720.041 (2)*
C20.46810.54240.15370.050 (3)*
C30.70100.55490.25850.058 (3)*
C40.76420.37930.37660.059 (3)*
C50.59460.19100.39010.054 (3)*
C60.36170.17840.28540.050 (3)*
H20.42500.66240.07300.0603*
H40.92340.38790.44820.0706*
H50.63770.07090.47090.0641*
H60.24570.04970.29460.0596*
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
O70.05 (3)0.053 (4)0.060 (3)0.003 (7)0.011 (6)0.000 (3)
F80.06 (3)0.062 (4)0.104 (5)0.025 (7)0.030 (7)0.005 (3)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
O7—H70.773C3—C41.39
O7—C11.354 (15)C4—C51.39
F8—C31.331 (12)C4—H40.950
C1—C21.39C5—C61.39
C1—C61.39C5—H50.950
C2—C31.39C6—H60.950
C2—H20.950
H7—O7—C1113.192C3—C4—C5120.00
O7—C1—C2121.9 (3)C3—C4—H4120.000
O7—C1—C6118.1 (3)C5—C4—H4120.000
C2—C1—C6120.00C4—C5—C6120.00
C1—C2—C3120.00C4—C5—H5120.000
C1—C2—H2120.000C6—C5—H5120.000
C3—C2—H2120.000C5—C6—C1120.00
C2—C3—F8120.1 (4)C5—C6—H6120.000
C2—C3—C4120.00C1—C6—H6120.000
F8—C3—C4119.9 (4)
(3CL) top
Crystal data top
C6H5ClODx = 1.487 Mg m3
Mr = 128.56Mo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
Orthorhombic, P212121Cell parameters from 1504 reflections
a = 3.9846 (5) Åθ = 5–25°
b = 13.9272 (19) ŵ = 0.55 mm1
c = 20.699 (3) ÅT = 150 K
V = 1148.7 (3) Å3Rod, colourless
Z = 80.90 × 0.10 × 0.10 mm
F(000) = 528
Data collection top
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
1376 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.052
ω scansθmax = 25.0°, θmin = 1.8°
Absorption correction: multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
h = 44
Tmin = 0.22, Tmax = 0.95k = 1615
4548 measured reflectionsl = 2422
1987 independent reflections
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Hydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
Least-squares matrix: fullH atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.069 P = P(6)*max(Fo2,0) + (1-P(6))Fc2 Method = SHELXL 97 (Sheldrick, 1997) W = 1. / [Sigma2(F2) + (P(1)p)2 + P(2)p + P(4) + P(5)Sin(theta)] P(i) are: 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.333
wR(F2) = 0.143(Δ/σ)max = 0.000204
S = 0.94Δρmax = 0.56 e Å3
1977 reflectionsΔρmin = 0.58 e Å3
152 parametersAbsolute structure: Flack, 10 Friedel-pairs
2 restraintsAbsolute structure parameter: 0.1 (2)
Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methods
Crystal data top
C6H5ClOV = 1148.7 (3) Å3
Mr = 128.56Z = 8
Orthorhombic, P212121Mo Kα radiation
a = 3.9846 (5) ŵ = 0.55 mm1
b = 13.9272 (19) ÅT = 150 K
c = 20.699 (3) Å0.90 × 0.10 × 0.10 mm
Data collection top
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
1987 independent reflections
Absorption correction: multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
1376 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Tmin = 0.22, Tmax = 0.95Rint = 0.052
4548 measured reflections
Refinement top
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.069H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
wR(F2) = 0.143Δρmax = 0.56 e Å3
S = 0.94Δρmin = 0.58 e Å3
1977 reflectionsAbsolute structure: Flack, 10 Friedel-pairs
152 parametersAbsolute structure parameter: 0.1 (2)
2 restraints
Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
C110.1389 (17)0.4542 (5)1.0155 (3)0.0307
C210.2721 (18)0.5022 (5)0.9628 (3)0.0298
C310.4339 (17)0.5888 (4)0.9724 (3)0.0285
C410.4796 (19)0.6256 (5)1.0352 (3)0.0354
C510.3484 (18)0.5759 (5)1.0870 (4)0.0390
C610.1842 (17)0.4893 (5)1.0775 (3)0.0292
O710.0253 (14)0.3688 (3)1.0033 (2)0.0380
Cl810.5944 (5)0.64964 (14)0.90659 (9)0.0436
C120.0342 (18)0.2531 (5)0.8518 (3)0.0299
C220.1901 (16)0.3385 (5)0.8375 (3)0.0264
C320.3016 (15)0.3544 (5)0.7756 (3)0.0339
C420.2603 (17)0.2870 (5)0.7263 (3)0.0348
C520.1052 (17)0.2016 (5)0.7422 (3)0.0351
C620.0089 (19)0.1837 (4)0.8041 (3)0.0344
O720.0864 (14)0.2336 (3)0.9123 (2)0.0385
Cl820.4871 (5)0.46531 (12)0.75731 (8)0.0423
H720.02 (2)0.277 (4)0.935 (3)0.0500*
H710.08 (2)0.351 (5)1.043 (2)0.0500*
H210.25230.47600.92060.0358*
H410.59910.68381.04170.0425*
H510.37070.60111.12940.0468*
H610.10260.45411.11350.0351*
H220.22040.38590.86990.0316*
H420.33580.29950.68360.0418*
H520.07620.15390.70980.0421*
H620.11590.12460.81400.0413*
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
C110.030 (4)0.026 (4)0.036 (4)0.009 (3)0.003 (3)0.002 (3)
C210.026 (4)0.037 (4)0.026 (4)0.006 (3)0.001 (3)0.002 (3)
C310.021 (4)0.019 (3)0.045 (4)0.008 (3)0.001 (3)0.002 (3)
C410.025 (4)0.032 (4)0.049 (4)0.000 (3)0.001 (4)0.006 (3)
C510.035 (4)0.041 (4)0.042 (4)0.000 (3)0.003 (4)0.014 (4)
C610.037 (4)0.024 (4)0.026 (4)0.006 (3)0.000 (3)0.005 (3)
O710.046 (3)0.029 (3)0.039 (3)0.003 (3)0.010 (3)0.001 (2)
Cl810.0423 (11)0.0392 (10)0.0493 (10)0.0064 (9)0.0005 (10)0.0103 (9)
C120.027 (4)0.033 (4)0.030 (3)0.004 (3)0.002 (3)0.004 (3)
C220.033 (4)0.015 (3)0.031 (3)0.004 (3)0.001 (3)0.001 (3)
C320.020 (3)0.035 (4)0.046 (4)0.009 (3)0.002 (3)0.014 (4)
C420.032 (4)0.042 (4)0.030 (4)0.007 (4)0.000 (3)0.002 (3)
C520.034 (4)0.036 (4)0.036 (4)0.005 (3)0.005 (4)0.005 (3)
C620.035 (4)0.026 (3)0.042 (4)0.005 (3)0.003 (4)0.002 (3)
O720.052 (3)0.032 (3)0.032 (3)0.010 (3)0.004 (3)0.001 (2)
Cl820.0432 (10)0.0337 (9)0.0500 (10)0.0004 (9)0.0075 (10)0.0070 (8)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
C11—C211.387 (9)C12—C221.374 (9)
C11—C611.384 (8)C12—C621.393 (8)
C11—O711.381 (8)C12—O721.368 (7)
C21—C311.382 (9)C22—C321.373 (8)
C21—H210.950C22—H220.950
C31—C411.409 (8)C32—C421.396 (9)
C31—Cl811.727 (7)C32—Cl821.754 (7)
C41—C511.380 (10)C42—C521.381 (9)
C41—H410.950C42—H420.950
C51—C611.385 (9)C52—C621.382 (9)
C51—H510.950C52—H520.950
C61—H610.950C62—H620.950
O71—H710.89 (4)O72—H720.81 (4)
C21—C11—C61120.6 (7)C22—C12—C62120.2 (6)
C21—C11—O71116.9 (6)C22—C12—O72121.9 (6)
C61—C11—O71122.4 (6)C62—C12—O72117.9 (6)
C11—C21—C31119.0 (6)C12—C22—C32119.1 (6)
C11—C21—H21120.476C12—C22—H22120.427
C31—C21—H21120.475C32—C22—H22120.427
C21—C31—C41120.8 (6)C22—C32—C42122.4 (6)
C21—C31—Cl81119.1 (5)C22—C32—Cl82118.6 (6)
C41—C31—Cl81120.1 (5)C42—C32—Cl82118.9 (5)
C31—C41—C51119.0 (7)C32—C42—C52117.3 (6)
C31—C41—H41120.481C32—C42—H42121.369
C51—C41—H41120.486C52—C42—H42121.368
C41—C51—C61120.3 (7)C42—C52—C62121.5 (6)
C41—C51—H51119.827C42—C52—H52119.250
C61—C51—H51119.827C62—C52—H52119.249
C51—C61—C11120.0 (6)C12—C62—C52119.5 (6)
C51—C61—H61119.981C12—C62—H62120.240
C11—C61—H61119.981C52—C62—H62120.235
C11—O71—H71101 (5)C12—O72—H72105 (5)
(3CLP) top
Crystal data top
C6H5ClODx = 1.451 Mg m3
Mr = 128.56Mo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
Orthorhombic, P212121Cell parameters from 983 reflections
a = 4.0949 (4) Åθ = 3–23°
b = 13.875 (3) ŵ = 0.53 mm1
c = 20.716 (3) ÅT = 293 K
V = 1177.0 (3) Å3Colourless, block
Z = 80.30 × 0.30 × 0.18 mm
F(000) = 528
Data collection top
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
476 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.147
ω scansθmax = 23.3°, θmin = 2.5°
Absorption correction: multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
h = 04
Tmin = 0.85, Tmax = 0.91k = 013
6533 measured reflectionsl = 021
780 independent reflections
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Hydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
Least-squares matrix: fullH-atom parameters not refined
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.098 P = P(6)*max(Fo2,0) + (1-P(6))Fc2 Method = SHELXL 97 (Sheldrick, 1997) W = 1. / [Sigma2(F2) + (P(1)p)2 + P(2)p + P(4) + P(5)Sin(theta)] P(i) are: 0.106 5.04 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.333
wR(F2) = 0.244(Δ/σ)max = 0.004
S = 0.99Δρmax = 0.59 e Å3
780 reflectionsΔρmin = 0.56 e Å3
62 parametersAbsolute structure: Flack, 0 Friedel-pairs
64 restraintsAbsolute structure parameter: 1.1 (5)
Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methods
Crystal data top
C6H5ClOV = 1177.0 (3) Å3
Mr = 128.56Z = 8
Orthorhombic, P212121Mo Kα radiation
a = 4.0949 (4) ŵ = 0.53 mm1
b = 13.875 (3) ÅT = 293 K
c = 20.716 (3) Å0.30 × 0.30 × 0.18 mm
Data collection top
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
780 independent reflections
Absorption correction: multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
476 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Tmin = 0.85, Tmax = 0.91Rint = 0.147
6533 measured reflectionsθmax = 23.3°
Refinement top
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.098H-atom parameters not refined
wR(F2) = 0.244Δρmax = 0.59 e Å3
S = 0.99Δρmin = 0.56 e Å3
780 reflectionsAbsolute structure: Flack, 0 Friedel-pairs
62 parametersAbsolute structure parameter: 1.1 (5)
64 restraints
Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
C110.14330.45281.01570.043 (4)*
C210.27430.50210.96340.047 (4)*
C310.44460.58750.97320.054 (4)*
C410.48390.62361.03530.064 (4)*
C510.35290.57431.08760.058 (4)*
C610.18260.48881.07780.050 (4)*
O710.026 (2)0.3696 (2)1.00767 (10)0.0683
Cl810.5969 (11)0.6480 (2)0.90755 (14)0.0800
C120.02200.25360.85230.049 (4)*
C220.18160.33920.83750.053 (4)*
C320.29850.35500.77540.054 (4)*
C420.25570.28520.72810.061 (4)*
C520.09600.19950.74280.066 (5)*
C620.02080.18380.80490.061 (4)*
O720.1012 (16)0.2366 (3)0.9123 (2)0.0641
Cl820.4850 (11)0.4630 (3)0.75811 (10)0.0773
H710.14780.35401.03930.0500*
H720.02600.27180.94140.0500*
H210.24750.47750.92090.0562*
H410.60030.68201.04200.0762*
H510.37970.59891.13010.0703*
H610.09300.45511.11360.0610*
H220.21090.38700.86990.0630*
H420.33560.29590.68560.0724*
H520.06680.15180.71050.0798*
H620.12990.12520.81500.0731*
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
O710.087 (7)0.060 (10)0.059 (7)0.020 (7)0.015 (6)0.006 (4)
Cl810.104 (3)0.061 (4)0.074 (3)0.013 (3)0.003 (3)0.024 (2)
O720.108 (8)0.038 (9)0.047 (6)0.018 (6)0.016 (6)0.005 (4)
Cl820.099 (3)0.060 (4)0.073 (3)0.003 (3)0.018 (3)0.0178 (19)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
C11—C211.39C12—C221.39
C11—C611.39C12—C621.39
C11—O711.356 (4)C12—O721.361 (3)
C21—C311.39C22—C321.39
C21—H210.950C22—H220.950
C31—C411.39C32—C421.39
C31—Cl811.715 (4)C32—Cl821.719 (4)
C41—C511.39C42—C521.39
C41—H410.950C42—H420.950
C51—C611.39C52—C621.39
C51—H510.950C52—H520.950
C61—H610.950C62—H620.950
O71—H710.852O72—H720.834
C21—C11—C61120.00C22—C12—C62120.00
C21—C11—O71121.37 (7)C22—C12—O72121.51 (7)
C61—C11—O71118.63 (7)C62—C12—O72118.48 (6)
C11—C21—C31120.00C12—C22—C32120.00
C11—C21—H21120.000C12—C22—H22120.000
C31—C21—H21120.000C32—C22—H22120.000
C21—C31—C41120.00C22—C32—C42120.00
C21—C31—Cl81118.95 (6)C22—C32—Cl82118.91 (6)
C41—C31—Cl81121.04 (6)C42—C32—Cl82121.06 (6)
C31—C41—C51120.00C32—C42—C52120.00
C31—C41—H41120.000C32—C42—H42120.000
C51—C41—H41120.000C52—C42—H42120.000
C41—C51—C61120.00C42—C52—C62120.00
C41—C51—H51120.000C42—C52—H52120.000
C61—C51—H51120.000C62—C52—H52120.000
C11—C61—C51120.00C12—C62—C52120.00
C11—C61—H61120.000C12—C62—H62120.000
C51—C61—H61120.000C52—C62—H62120.000
C11—O71—H71114.868C12—O72—H72114.913
(4CL1) top
Crystal data top
C6H5ClOF(000) = 528
Mr = 128.56Dx = 1.455 Mg m3
Monoclinic, P21/cMo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
a = 8.7086 (11) ÅCell parameters from 3307 reflections
b = 15.4523 (19) Åθ = 2–29°
c = 8.7414 (11) ŵ = 0.53 mm1
β = 93.954 (2)°T = 150 K
V = 1173.5 (3) Å3Block, colourless
Z = 80.44 × 0.38 × 0.25 mm
Data collection top
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
2442 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.024
ω scansθmax = 28.8°, θmin = 2.3°
Absorption correction: multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
h = 911
Tmin = 0.69, Tmax = 0.88k = 2019
7471 measured reflectionsl = 1110
2839 independent reflections
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Hydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
Least-squares matrix: fullH atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.039 P = P(6)*max(Fo2,0) + (1-P(6))Fc2 Method = SHELXL 97 (Sheldrick, 1997) W = 1. / [Sigma2(F2) + (P(1)p)2 + P(2)p + P(4) + P(5)Sin(theta)] P(i) are: 0.684E-01 0.725 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.333
wR(F2) = 0.101(Δ/σ)max = 0.001
S = 0.74Δρmax = 0.33 e Å3
2839 reflectionsΔρmin = 0.31 e Å3
152 parametersExtinction correction: Larson 1970 Crystallographic Computing eq 22
2 restraintsExtinction coefficient: 45 (11)
Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methods
Crystal data top
C6H5ClOV = 1173.5 (3) Å3
Mr = 128.56Z = 8
Monoclinic, P21/cMo Kα radiation
a = 8.7086 (11) ŵ = 0.53 mm1
b = 15.4523 (19) ÅT = 150 K
c = 8.7414 (11) Å0.44 × 0.38 × 0.25 mm
β = 93.954 (2)°
Data collection top
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
2839 independent reflections
Absorption correction: multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
2442 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Tmin = 0.69, Tmax = 0.88Rint = 0.024
7471 measured reflections
Refinement top
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.0392 restraints
wR(F2) = 0.101H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
S = 0.74Δρmax = 0.33 e Å3
2839 reflectionsΔρmin = 0.31 e Å3
152 parameters
Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
C111.06333 (17)0.86425 (11)0.17530 (18)0.0249
C211.16611 (19)0.85202 (11)0.0632 (2)0.0291
C311.2470 (2)0.92194 (12)0.01072 (19)0.0308
C411.22279 (18)1.00316 (11)0.07053 (19)0.0271
C511.11976 (19)1.01599 (11)0.18165 (19)0.0284
C611.03955 (18)0.94587 (11)0.23426 (19)0.0272
O710.98528 (14)0.79260 (8)0.22328 (14)0.0304
Cl811.32180 (5)1.09146 (3)0.00165 (5)0.0380
C120.69379 (17)0.67154 (10)0.01969 (18)0.0238
C220.62387 (19)0.70668 (11)0.14329 (18)0.0278
C320.47123 (19)0.68836 (11)0.16344 (19)0.0282
C420.39015 (18)0.63485 (10)0.06042 (19)0.0256
C520.4581 (2)0.60033 (11)0.06413 (19)0.0281
C620.61153 (19)0.61851 (10)0.08394 (19)0.0277
O720.84562 (14)0.68764 (8)0.00399 (14)0.0315
Cl820.19921 (5)0.61016 (3)0.08950 (5)0.0353
H710.942 (3)0.8050 (16)0.300 (2)0.0500*
H720.885 (3)0.7164 (15)0.066 (3)0.0500*
H211.18110.79590.02240.0351*
H311.31830.91410.06560.0373*
H511.10411.07230.22150.0339*
H610.96840.95380.31070.0328*
H220.68070.74320.21390.0335*
H320.42250.71240.24760.0342*
H520.40040.56460.13540.0336*
H620.66000.59460.16840.0335*
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
C110.0220 (7)0.0286 (8)0.0240 (7)0.0004 (6)0.0013 (6)0.0016 (6)
C210.0295 (8)0.0290 (8)0.0293 (8)0.0030 (7)0.0066 (6)0.0022 (6)
C310.0292 (8)0.0384 (9)0.0256 (8)0.0000 (7)0.0071 (6)0.0009 (7)
C410.0243 (7)0.0320 (8)0.0246 (8)0.0051 (6)0.0023 (6)0.0045 (6)
C510.0291 (8)0.0272 (8)0.0285 (8)0.0002 (6)0.0006 (6)0.0030 (6)
C610.0230 (7)0.0332 (9)0.0258 (8)0.0017 (6)0.0037 (6)0.0024 (6)
O710.0319 (6)0.0299 (6)0.0308 (7)0.0036 (5)0.0107 (5)0.0008 (5)
Cl810.0403 (3)0.0389 (3)0.0346 (2)0.01376 (18)0.00157 (18)0.00619 (18)
C120.0238 (7)0.0240 (7)0.0241 (7)0.0004 (6)0.0048 (6)0.0038 (6)
C220.0293 (8)0.0295 (8)0.0249 (8)0.0048 (6)0.0049 (6)0.0044 (6)
C320.0288 (8)0.0317 (8)0.0250 (8)0.0013 (6)0.0084 (6)0.0018 (6)
C420.0234 (7)0.0258 (8)0.0278 (8)0.0020 (6)0.0043 (6)0.0048 (6)
C520.0313 (8)0.0270 (8)0.0257 (8)0.0030 (6)0.0009 (6)0.0006 (6)
C620.0325 (8)0.0274 (8)0.0239 (8)0.0007 (6)0.0076 (6)0.0018 (6)
O720.0261 (6)0.0380 (7)0.0314 (6)0.0047 (5)0.0089 (5)0.0057 (5)
Cl820.0253 (2)0.0422 (3)0.0387 (3)0.00696 (17)0.00520 (17)0.00136 (18)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
C11—C211.385 (2)C12—C221.387 (2)
C11—C611.383 (2)C12—C621.384 (2)
C11—O711.3795 (19)C12—O721.3750 (18)
C21—C311.385 (2)C22—C321.382 (2)
C21—H210.950C22—H220.950
C31—C411.381 (2)C32—C421.380 (2)
C31—H310.950C32—H320.950
C41—C511.381 (2)C42—C521.381 (2)
C41—Cl811.7433 (17)C42—Cl821.7416 (16)
C51—C611.385 (2)C52—C621.388 (2)
C51—H510.950C52—H520.950
C61—H610.950C62—H620.950
O71—H710.815 (19)O72—H720.816 (19)
C21—C11—C61120.58 (15)C22—C12—C62120.43 (14)
C21—C11—O71117.49 (15)C22—C12—O72121.66 (14)
C61—C11—O71121.93 (14)C62—C12—O72117.92 (14)
C11—C21—C31119.74 (16)C12—C22—C32119.79 (15)
C11—C21—H21120.132C12—C22—H22120.105
C31—C21—H21120.133C32—C22—H22120.106
C21—C31—C41119.28 (15)C22—C32—C42119.52 (15)
C21—C31—H31120.358C22—C32—H32120.242
C41—C31—H31120.358C42—C32—H32120.241
C31—C41—C51121.33 (15)C32—C42—C52121.19 (15)
C31—C41—Cl81119.24 (13)C32—C42—Cl82119.11 (13)
C51—C41—Cl81119.42 (13)C52—C42—Cl82119.69 (13)
C41—C51—C61119.22 (15)C42—C52—C62119.23 (15)
C41—C51—H51120.391C42—C52—H52120.386
C61—C51—H51120.391C62—C52—H52120.386
C51—C61—C11119.85 (15)C52—C62—C12119.83 (14)
C51—C61—H61120.077C52—C62—H62120.084
C11—C61—H61120.077C12—C62—H62120.083
C11—O71—H71109.2 (18)C12—O72—H72110.4 (17)
(4CL2) top
Crystal data top
C6H5ClOF(000) = 528
Mr = 128.56Dx = 1.462 Mg m3
Monoclinic, P21/cMo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
a = 3.9724 (5) ÅCell parameters from 2464 reflections
b = 12.7328 (17) Åθ = 3–28°
c = 23.155 (3) ŵ = 0.54 mm1
β = 94.126 (2)°T = 150 K
V = 1168.2 (3) Å3Colourless, plate
Z = 80.70 × 0.50 × 0.36 mm
Data collection top
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
2219 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.016
ω scansθmax = 28.9°, θmin = 1.8°
Absorption correction: multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
h = 45
Tmin = 0.49, Tmax = 0.82k = 1417
7449 measured reflectionsl = 3129
2843 independent reflections
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methods
Least-squares matrix: fullHydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.043H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
wR(F2) = 0.110 P = P(6)*max(Fo2,0) + (1-P(6))Fc2 Method = SHELXL 97 (Sheldrick, 1997) W = 1. / [Sigma2(F2) + (P(1)p)2 + P(2)p + P(4) + P(5)Sin(theta)] P(i) are: 0.700E-01 0.890 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.333
S = 0.75(Δ/σ)max = 0.001
2843 reflectionsΔρmax = 0.44 e Å3
151 parametersΔρmin = 0.44 e Å3
2 restraints
Crystal data top
C6H5ClOV = 1168.2 (3) Å3
Mr = 128.56Z = 8
Monoclinic, P21/cMo Kα radiation
a = 3.9724 (5) ŵ = 0.54 mm1
b = 12.7328 (17) ÅT = 150 K
c = 23.155 (3) Å0.70 × 0.50 × 0.36 mm
β = 94.126 (2)°
Data collection top
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
2843 independent reflections
Absorption correction: multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
2219 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Tmin = 0.49, Tmax = 0.82Rint = 0.016
7449 measured reflections
Refinement top
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.0432 restraints
wR(F2) = 0.110H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
S = 0.75Δρmax = 0.44 e Å3
2843 reflectionsΔρmin = 0.44 e Å3
151 parameters
Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
C111.0131 (5)0.59662 (16)0.37175 (8)0.0252
C210.9419 (5)0.70294 (16)0.37324 (8)0.0251
C311.0331 (5)0.76729 (15)0.32892 (9)0.0259
C411.1906 (5)0.72440 (17)0.28330 (8)0.0261
C511.2588 (5)0.61826 (17)0.28103 (9)0.0294
C611.1694 (5)0.55424 (16)0.32553 (9)0.0294
O710.9285 (4)0.52928 (12)0.41504 (6)0.0344
Cl811.31142 (14)0.80703 (5)0.22847 (2)0.0368
C120.6315 (5)0.70387 (15)0.53908 (8)0.0239
C220.4419 (5)0.77671 (16)0.50664 (8)0.0259
C320.3853 (5)0.87501 (16)0.52983 (10)0.0295
C420.5209 (5)0.89835 (15)0.58478 (9)0.0289
C520.7130 (5)0.82661 (16)0.61705 (8)0.0285
C620.7690 (5)0.72826 (16)0.59388 (8)0.0270
O720.6774 (4)0.60666 (11)0.51475 (6)0.0315
Cl820.44248 (17)1.02081 (4)0.61477 (3)0.0466
H710.842 (7)0.561 (2)0.4395 (11)0.0500*
H720.777 (7)0.570 (2)0.5385 (12)0.0500*
H210.83070.73160.40460.0301*
H310.98760.84050.32990.0309*
H511.36600.58960.24920.0353*
H611.21510.48110.32450.0352*
H220.35100.75960.46870.0311*
H320.25440.92570.50810.0356*
H520.80610.84420.65480.0343*
H620.90150.67790.61560.0326*
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
C110.0252 (10)0.0276 (10)0.0224 (9)0.0025 (8)0.0017 (7)0.0004 (7)
C210.0254 (10)0.0276 (10)0.0223 (9)0.0047 (8)0.0014 (7)0.0050 (7)
C310.0249 (10)0.0230 (9)0.0293 (10)0.0022 (7)0.0022 (8)0.0017 (8)
C410.022 (1)0.0332 (10)0.0222 (9)0.0032 (8)0.0008 (7)0.0017 (8)
C510.0288 (11)0.0334 (11)0.0261 (10)0.0039 (8)0.0023 (8)0.0063 (8)
C610.0323 (11)0.0251 (10)0.0308 (10)0.0041 (8)0.0011 (8)0.0049 (8)
O710.0484 (10)0.0278 (8)0.0279 (8)0.0082 (7)0.0086 (7)0.0036 (6)
Cl810.0360 (3)0.0441 (3)0.0306 (3)0.0003 (2)0.0043 (2)0.0097 (2)
C120.0269 (10)0.0214 (9)0.0245 (9)0.0018 (7)0.0087 (7)0.0008 (7)
C220.0257 (10)0.0267 (10)0.0253 (9)0.0004 (8)0.0027 (8)0.0010 (8)
C320.0253 (10)0.0253 (10)0.0386 (11)0.0037 (8)0.0060 (8)0.0037 (8)
C420.0284 (10)0.0205 (9)0.0394 (11)0.0024 (8)0.0134 (8)0.0059 (8)
C520.0329 (11)0.0279 (10)0.0251 (9)0.0065 (8)0.0055 (8)0.0027 (8)
C620.0293 (11)0.0265 (10)0.0258 (10)0.0003 (8)0.0049 (8)0.0032 (8)
O720.0466 (9)0.0218 (7)0.0264 (7)0.0041 (6)0.0044 (6)0.0015 (6)
Cl820.0538 (4)0.0260 (3)0.0620 (4)0.0017 (2)0.0183 (3)0.0140 (3)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
C11—C211.384 (3)C12—C221.382 (3)
C11—C611.385 (3)C12—C621.380 (3)
C11—O711.379 (2)C12—O721.377 (2)
C21—C311.382 (3)C22—C321.387 (3)
C21—H210.950C22—H220.950
C31—C411.379 (3)C32—C421.378 (3)
C31—H310.950C32—H320.950
C41—C511.380 (3)C42—C521.376 (3)
C41—Cl811.743 (2)C42—Cl821.744 (2)
C51—C611.380 (3)C52—C621.387 (3)
C51—H510.950C52—H520.950
C61—H610.950C62—H620.950
O71—H710.79 (2)O72—H720.81 (3)
C21—C11—C61120.28 (19)C22—C12—C62120.86 (18)
C21—C11—O71121.95 (18)C22—C12—O72117.63 (18)
C61—C11—O71117.76 (18)C62—C12—O72121.52 (18)
C11—C21—C31119.77 (18)C12—C22—C32119.50 (19)
C11—C21—H21120.125C12—C22—H22120.247
C31—C21—H21120.107C32—C22—H22120.254
C21—C31—C41119.47 (18)C22—C32—C42119.26 (19)
C21—C31—H31120.267C22—C32—H32120.366
C41—C31—H31120.264C42—C32—H32120.375
C31—C41—C51121.20 (19)C32—C42—C52121.53 (19)
C31—C41—Cl81118.89 (16)C32—C42—Cl82119.43 (17)
C51—C41—Cl81119.90 (16)C52—C42—Cl82119.03 (17)
C41—C51—C61119.23 (18)C42—C52—C62119.19 (19)
C41—C51—H51120.384C42—C52—H52120.404
C61—C51—H51120.388C62—C52—H52120.410
C11—C61—C51120.04 (19)C52—C62—C12119.66 (19)
C11—C61—H61119.976C52—C62—H62120.172
C51—C61—H61119.986C12—C62—H62120.167
C11—O71—H71110 (2)C12—O72—H72109 (2)
(4CL2P) top
Crystal data top
C6H5ClOF(000) = 528
Mr = 128.56Dx = 1.408 Mg m3
Monoclinic, P21/cMo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
a = 4.1096 (4) ÅCell parameters from 1170 reflections
b = 12.7665 (10) Åθ = 3–19°
c = 23.181 (3) ŵ = 0.52 mm1
β = 94.201 (14)°T = 293 K
V = 1212.9 (2) Å3Block, colourless
Z = 80.30 × 0.30 × 0.18 mm
Data collection top
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
397 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.063
ω scansθmax = 23.2°, θmin = 3.2°
Absorption correction: multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
h = 44
Tmin = 0.68, Tmax = 0.91k = 014
7359 measured reflectionsl = 010
711 independent reflections
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methods
Least-squares matrix: fullHydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.055H-atom parameters not refined
wR(F2) = 0.160 P = P(6)*max(Fo2,0) + (1-P(6))Fc2 Method = SHELXL 97 (Sheldrick, 1997) W = 1. / [Sigma2(F2) + (P(1)p)2 + P(2)p + P(4) + P(5)Sin(theta)] P(i) are: 0.625E-01 1.91 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.333
S = 1.03(Δ/σ)max = 0.007
710 reflectionsΔρmax = 0.21 e Å3
61 parametersΔρmin = 0.20 e Å3
64 restraints
Crystal data top
C6H5ClOV = 1212.9 (2) Å3
Mr = 128.56Z = 8
Monoclinic, P21/cMo Kα radiation
a = 4.1096 (4) ŵ = 0.52 mm1
b = 12.7665 (10) ÅT = 293 K
c = 23.181 (3) Å0.30 × 0.30 × 0.18 mm
β = 94.201 (14)°
Data collection top
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
711 independent reflections
Absorption correction: multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
397 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Tmin = 0.68, Tmax = 0.91Rint = 0.063
7359 measured reflectionsθmax = 23.2°
Refinement top
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.05564 restraints
wR(F2) = 0.160H-atom parameters not refined
S = 1.03Δρmax = 0.21 e Å3
710 reflectionsΔρmin = 0.20 e Å3
61 parameters
Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
C111.01090.59620.37130.072 (2)*
C210.94460.70280.37360.067 (2)*
C311.03530.76860.32980.060 (2)*
C411.19230.72780.28360.070 (2)*
C511.25860.62110.28130.084 (3)*
C611.16790.55530.32520.079 (3)*
O710.9233 (13)0.52747 (8)0.4157 (2)0.0783
Cl811.3116 (5)0.80847 (15)0.23084 (16)0.1012
C120.63440.70250.54020.062 (2)*
C220.44020.77400.50820.071 (2)*
C320.38050.87220.53100.069 (2)*
C420.51490.89900.58580.067 (2)*
C520.70900.82760.61780.079 (3)*
C620.76880.72930.59500.070 (2)*
O720.6886 (13)0.6083 (2)0.51791 (13)0.1113
Cl820.4331 (7)1.01825 (15)0.61446 (12)0.1271
H710.85650.54850.44580.0500*
H720.81830.56260.53590.1047*
H210.83730.73070.40510.0800*
H310.99000.84150.33130.0721*
H511.36590.59320.24980.1012*
H611.21320.48250.32360.0951*
H220.34830.75560.47080.0850*
H320.24780.92110.50910.0832*
H520.80090.84590.65520.0951*
H620.90150.68050.61680.0840*
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
O710.125 (5)0.086 (4)0.03 (3)0.013 (3)0.035 (8)0.008 (5)
Cl810.1012 (17)0.1153 (18)0.087 (12)0.0038 (12)0.009 (3)0.026 (2)
O720.123 (4)0.050 (3)0.16 (2)0.011 (3)0.016 (7)0.006 (5)
Cl820.144 (2)0.0714 (13)0.172 (12)0.0035 (12)0.050 (3)0.028 (2)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
C11—C211.39C12—C221.39
C11—C611.39C12—C621.39
C11—O711.418 (3)C12—O721.334 (2)
C21—C311.39C22—C321.39
C21—H210.950C22—H220.950
C31—C411.39C32—C421.39
C31—H310.950C32—H320.950
C41—C511.39C42—C521.39
C41—Cl811.699 (3)C42—Cl821.704 (2)
C51—C611.39C52—C621.39
C51—H510.950C52—H520.950
C61—H610.950C62—H620.950
O71—H710.815O72—H720.875
C21—C11—C61120.00C22—C12—C62120.00
C21—C11—O71121.11 (7)C22—C12—O72119.39 (6)
C61—C11—O71118.89 (7)C62—C12—O72120.61 (6)
C11—C21—C31120.00C12—C22—C32120.00
C11—C21—H21120.000C12—C22—H22120.000
C31—C21—H21120.000C32—C22—H22120.000
C21—C31—C41120.00C22—C32—C42120.00
C21—C31—H31120.000C22—C32—H32120.000
C41—C31—H31120.000C42—C32—H32120.000
C31—C41—C51120.00C32—C42—C52120.00
C31—C41—Cl81120.08 (6)C32—C42—Cl82119.99 (7)
C51—C41—Cl81119.90 (6)C52—C42—Cl82119.99 (7)
C41—C51—C61120.00C42—C52—C62120.00
C41—C51—H51120.000C42—C52—H52120.000
C61—C51—H51120.000C62—C52—H52120.000
C11—C61—C51120.00C12—C62—C52120.00
C11—C61—H61120.000C12—C62—H62120.000
C51—C61—H61120.000C52—C62—H62120.000
C11—O71—H71122.525C12—O72—H72121.943
(2F1) top
Crystal data top
C6H5FOF(000) = 696
Mr = 112.10Dx = 1.392 Mg m3
Monoclinic, C2/cMo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
a = 17.1336 (10) ÅCell parameters from 2044 reflections
b = 8.2766 (5) Åθ = 2–26°
c = 11.4975 (7) ŵ = 0.12 mm1
β = 100.234 (2)°T = 150 K
V = 1604.50 (17) Å3Cylinder, colourless
Z = 121.00 × 0.38 × 0.38 mm
Data collection top
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
1302 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.021
ω scansθmax = 28.7°, θmin = 2.4°
Absorption correction: multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
h = 2222
Tmin = 0.575, Tmax = 1.000k = 1011
7505 measured reflectionsl = 1515
1957 independent reflections
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Hydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
Least-squares matrix: fullH atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.056 P = P(6)*max(Fo2,0) + (1-P(6))Fc2 Method = SHELXL 97 (Sheldrick, 1997) W = 1. / [Sigma2(F2) + (P(1)p)2 + P(2)p + P(4) + P(5)Sin(theta)] P(i) are: 0.172E-01 1.34 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.333
wR(F2) = 0.111(Δ/σ)max = 0.000179
S = 1.08Δρmax = 0.32 e Å3
1956 reflectionsΔρmin = 0.40 e Å3
125 parametersExtinction correction: Larson 1970 Crystallographic Computing eq 22
14 restraintsExtinction coefficient: 29 (9)
Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methods
Crystal data top
C6H5FOV = 1604.50 (17) Å3
Mr = 112.10Z = 12
Monoclinic, C2/cMo Kα radiation
a = 17.1336 (10) ŵ = 0.12 mm1
b = 8.2766 (5) ÅT = 150 K
c = 11.4975 (7) Å1.00 × 0.38 × 0.38 mm
β = 100.234 (2)°
Data collection top
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
1957 independent reflections
Absorption correction: multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
1302 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Tmin = 0.575, Tmax = 1.000Rint = 0.021
7505 measured reflections
Refinement top
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.05614 restraints
wR(F2) = 0.111H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
S = 1.08Δρmax = 0.32 e Å3
1956 reflectionsΔρmin = 0.40 e Å3
125 parameters
Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/UeqOcc. (<1)
C110.63513 (11)0.0773 (3)0.59162 (18)0.0371
C210.66814 (13)0.0140 (3)0.5134 (2)0.0457
C310.74867 (14)0.0170 (3)0.5146 (2)0.0545
C410.79752 (13)0.0740 (4)0.5970 (2)0.0560
C510.76568 (13)0.1655 (4)0.6765 (2)0.0542
C610.68456 (13)0.1672 (3)0.67446 (19)0.0446
O710.55429 (9)0.0768 (2)0.58623 (14)0.0443
F810.61874 (8)0.1033 (2)0.43296 (13)0.0707
C120.50000.4249 (4)0.75000.0319
C220.53050 (11)0.5110 (3)0.66635 (18)0.0377
C320.53071 (13)0.6767 (3)0.6650 (2)0.0484
C420.50000.7589 (4)0.75000.0560
O720.50000.2598 (3)0.75000.0454
F820.56421 (14)0.4402 (3)0.5881 (2)0.04380.5000
H720.511 (3)0.214 (6)0.694 (4)0.0500*0.5000
H710.541 (3)0.145 (5)0.632 (4)0.0527*0.5000
H7120.527 (2)0.032 (6)0.527 (3)0.0527*0.5000
H310.77010.08110.45930.0665*
H410.85320.07370.59900.0666*
H510.79960.22840.73350.0635*
H610.66310.23040.73020.0531*
H320.55190.73370.60590.0566*
H420.50000.87370.75000.0645*
H620.55210.45410.60770.0449*0.5000
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
C110.0317 (10)0.0416 (13)0.0380 (12)0.0015 (10)0.0063 (9)0.0065 (10)
C210.0365 (12)0.0536 (15)0.0462 (13)0.0059 (11)0.0048 (10)0.0052 (12)
C310.0407 (12)0.0704 (18)0.0553 (15)0.0058 (13)0.0160 (11)0.0029 (14)
C410.0303 (11)0.083 (2)0.0535 (15)0.0011 (13)0.0037 (11)0.0092 (15)
C510.0368 (12)0.0772 (19)0.0447 (14)0.0074 (12)0.0035 (11)0.0023 (13)
C610.0389 (12)0.0545 (15)0.0393 (13)0.0008 (11)0.0044 (10)0.0013 (11)
O710.0310 (8)0.0479 (11)0.0544 (11)0.0031 (7)0.0084 (7)0.0049 (8)
F810.0471 (8)0.0907 (12)0.0761 (10)0.0108 (8)0.0159 (7)0.0408 (10)
C120.0267 (13)0.0319 (16)0.0356 (15)0.00000.0012 (11)0.0000
C220.0297 (10)0.0443 (13)0.0383 (12)0.0039 (10)0.0043 (9)0.0079 (11)
C320.0439 (13)0.0409 (14)0.0567 (15)0.0054 (11)0.0009 (11)0.0184 (12)
C420.059 (2)0.0324 (19)0.070 (3)0.00000.0073 (19)0.0000
O720.0623 (15)0.0312 (13)0.0416 (14)0.00000.0065 (12)0.0000
F820.0513 (14)0.0443 (16)0.0399 (14)0.0068 (12)0.0194 (11)0.0049 (12)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
C11—C211.371 (3)O71—H7120.836 (19)
C11—C611.375 (3)C12—C22i1.373 (2)
C11—O711.375 (2)C12—C221.373 (2)
C21—C311.378 (3)C12—O721.366 (4)
C21—F811.357 (2)C22—C321.372 (3)
C31—C411.372 (3)C22—F821.293 (3)
C31—H310.950C22—H620.950
C41—C511.373 (4)C32—C421.371 (3)
C41—H410.950C32—H320.950
C51—C611.386 (3)C42—H420.950
C51—H510.950O72—H72i0.80 (3)
C61—H610.950O72—H720.80 (3)
O71—H710.830 (19)
C21—C11—C61118.51 (19)H71—O71—H712129 (5)
C21—C11—O71119.87 (19)C22i—C12—C22117.5 (3)
C61—C11—O71121.6 (2)C22i—C12—O72121.27 (14)
C11—C21—C31122.2 (2)C22—C12—O72121.27 (14)
C11—C21—F81117.86 (18)C12—C22—C32122.0 (2)
C31—C21—F81120.0 (2)C12—C22—F82121.7 (2)
C21—C31—C41118.9 (2)C32—C22—F82116.3 (2)
C21—C31—H31120.534C12—C22—H62119.020
C41—C31—H31120.529C32—C22—H62119.018
C31—C41—C51119.8 (2)F82—C22—H624.045
C31—C41—H41120.110C22—C32—C42119.1 (2)
C51—C41—H41120.108C22—C32—H32120.461
C41—C51—C61120.7 (2)C42—C32—H32120.458
C41—C51—H51119.663C32—C42—C32i120.5 (3)
C61—C51—H51119.655C32—C42—H42119.769
C51—C61—C11119.9 (2)C32i—C42—H42119.769
C51—C61—H61120.048C12—O72—H72i118 (4)
C11—C61—H61120.048C12—O72—H72118 (4)
C11—O71—H71111 (3)H72i—O72—H72123 (7)
C11—O71—H712117 (3)
Symmetry code: (i) x+1, y, z+3/2.
(2F2P) top
Crystal data top
C6H5FODx = 1.458 Mg m3
Mr = 112.10Mo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
Orthorhombic, P212121Cell parameters from 397 reflections
a = 5.7168 (7) Åθ = 3–20°
b = 9.9997 (19) ŵ = 0.12 mm1
c = 17.868 (2) ÅT = 403 K
V = 1021.4 (3) Å3Colourless, plate
Z = 80.30 × 0.30 × 0.18 mm
F(000) = 464
Data collection top
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
261 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.099
ω scansθmax = 23.3°, θmin = 3.1°
Absorption correction: multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
h = 06
Tmin = 0.96, Tmax = 0.98k = 05
3070 measured reflectionsl = 019
469 independent reflections
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Hydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
Least-squares matrix: fullH-atom parameters not refined
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.083 P = P(6)*max(Fo2,0) + (1-P(6))Fc2 Method = SHELXL 97 (Sheldrick, 1997) W = 1. / [Sigma2(F2) + (P(1)p)2 + P(2)p + P(4) + P(5)Sin(theta)] P(i) are: 0.173 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.333
wR(F2) = 0.251(Δ/σ)max = 0.001
S = 0.94Δρmax = 0.27 e Å3
461 reflectionsΔρmin = 0.20 e Å3
62 parametersAbsolute structure: Flack, 0 Friedel-pairs
64 restraintsAbsolute structure parameter: 2 (7)
Primary atom site location: simulated annealing
Crystal data top
C6H5FOV = 1021.4 (3) Å3
Mr = 112.10Z = 8
Orthorhombic, P212121Mo Kα radiation
a = 5.7168 (7) ŵ = 0.12 mm1
b = 9.9997 (19) ÅT = 403 K
c = 17.868 (2) Å0.30 × 0.30 × 0.18 mm
Data collection top
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
469 independent reflections
Absorption correction: multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
261 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Tmin = 0.96, Tmax = 0.98Rint = 0.099
3070 measured reflectionsθmax = 23.3°
Refinement top
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.083H-atom parameters not refined
wR(F2) = 0.251Δρmax = 0.27 e Å3
S = 0.94Δρmin = 0.20 e Å3
461 reflectionsAbsolute structure: Flack, 0 Friedel-pairs
62 parametersAbsolute structure parameter: 2 (7)
64 restraints
Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
O710.0148 (9)0.1191 (6)0.4817 (3)0.1063
F810.0058 (10)0.0482 (6)0.3630 (3)0.1228
O720.1484 (8)0.2974 (7)0.6168 (3)0.0811
F820.2395 (8)0.1434 (10)0.6241 (3)0.1001
H720.11670.23610.58260.0893*
H710.10320.12270.44940.1108*
C110.18100.02650.47030.077 (3)*
C210.16670.05790.40860.073 (3)*
C310.33800.15420.39670.089 (4)*
C410.52380.16610.44650.090 (4)*
C510.53810.08180.50810.083 (4)*
C610.36670.01450.52000.074 (3)*
C120.00360.31380.67190.058 (3)*
C220.20330.23470.67480.064 (3)*
C320.36340.25140.73260.088 (4)*
C420.32390.34720.78750.078 (4)*
C520.12420.42640.78460.088 (4)*
C620.03590.40970.72680.083 (4)*
H310.32820.21180.35460.1063*
H410.64090.23200.43830.1081*
H510.66500.09000.54220.0994*
H610.37660.07220.56220.0890*
H320.49990.19730.73460.1056*
H420.43330.35870.82700.0940*
H520.09710.49190.82220.1055*
H620.17240.46380.72490.0995*
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
O710.087 (5)0.15 (3)0.084 (5)0.017 (9)0.011 (4)0.002 (7)
F810.108 (4)0.18 (2)0.082 (4)0.001 (8)0.018 (3)0.025 (6)
O720.089 (5)0.08 (2)0.077 (4)0.001 (8)0.015 (4)0.012 (5)
F820.113 (5)0.088 (19)0.099 (4)0.004 (7)0.022 (4)0.028 (6)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
O71—H710.888C51—C611.39
O71—C111.343 (2)C51—H510.950
F81—C211.283 (5)C61—H610.950
O72—H720.885C12—C221.39
O72—C121.324 (2)C12—C621.39
F82—C221.303 (7)C22—C321.39
C11—C211.39C32—C421.39
C11—C611.39C32—H320.950
C21—C311.39C42—C521.39
C31—C411.39C42—H420.950
C31—H310.950C52—C621.39
C41—C511.39C52—H520.950
C41—H410.950C62—H620.950
H71—O71—C11117.800C51—C61—H61120.000
H72—O72—C12117.782O72—C12—C22119.74 (6)
O71—C11—C21119.81 (6)O72—C12—C62120.26 (6)
O71—C11—C61120.19 (6)C22—C12—C62120.00
C21—C11—C61120.00C12—C22—F82120.23 (7)
C11—C21—F81120.20 (7)C12—C22—C32120.00
C11—C21—C31120.00F82—C22—C32119.76 (7)
F81—C21—C31119.80 (7)C22—C32—C42120.00
C21—C31—C41120.00C22—C32—H32120.000
C21—C31—H31120.000C42—C32—H32120.000
C41—C31—H31120.000C32—C42—C52120.00
C31—C41—C51120.00C32—C42—H42120.000
C31—C41—H41120.000C52—C42—H42120.000
C51—C41—H41120.000C42—C52—C62120.00
C41—C51—C61120.00C42—C52—H52120.000
C41—C51—H51120.000C62—C52—H52120.000
C61—C51—H51120.000C52—C62—C12120.00
C11—C61—C51120.00C52—C62—H62120.000
C11—C61—H61120.000C12—C62—H62120.000

Experimental details

(3F)(3FP)(3CL)(3CLP)
Crystal data
Chemical formulaC6H5FOC6H5FOC6H5ClOC6H5ClO
Mr112.10112.10128.56128.56
Crystal system, space groupMonoclinic, P21Monoclinic, P21Orthorhombic, P212121Orthorhombic, P212121
Temperature (K)150293150293
a, b, c (Å)5.6510 (12), 5.0642 (10), 9.3185 (19)5.6747 (9), 5.0760 (4), 9.4753 (13)3.9846 (5), 13.9272 (19), 20.699 (3)4.0949 (4), 13.875 (3), 20.716 (3)
α, β, γ (°)90, 107.518 (4), 9090, 107.832 (11), 9090, 90, 9090, 90, 90
V3)254.31 (9)259.82 (6)1148.7 (3)1177.0 (3)
Z2288
Radiation typeMo KαMo KαMo KαMo Kα
µ (mm1)0.120.120.550.53
Crystal size (mm)1.00 × 0.32 × 0.320.30 × 0.30 × 0.180.90 × 0.10 × 0.100.30 × 0.30 × 0.18
Data collection
DiffractometerBruker SMART
diffractometer
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
Absorption correctionMulti-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
Multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
Multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
Multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
Tmin, Tmax0.67, 0.960.67, 0.980.22, 0.950.85, 0.91
No. of measured, independent and
observed [I > 2σ(I)] reflections
1603, 672, 608 1310, 159, 146 4548, 1987, 1376 6533, 780, 476
Rint0.0140.0410.0520.147
θmax (°)28.623.225.023.3
(sin θ/λ)max1)0.6740.5540.5950.556
Refinement
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)], wR(F2), S 0.037, 0.092, 1.05 0.064, 0.160, 1.15 0.069, 0.143, 0.94 0.098, 0.244, 0.99
No. of reflections6721591977780
No. of parameters773215262
No. of restraints115264
H-atom treatmentH atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinementH-atom parameters not refinedH atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinementH-atom parameters not refined
Δρmax, Δρmin (e Å3)0.22, 0.220.17, 0.160.56, 0.580.59, 0.56
Absolute structureFlack, 0 Friedel-pairsFlack, 0 Friedel-pairsFlack, 10 Friedel-pairsFlack, 0 Friedel-pairs
Absolute structure parameter0 (3)11 (7)0.1 (2)1.1 (5)


(4CL1)(4CL2)(4CL2P)(2F1)
Crystal data
Chemical formulaC6H5ClOC6H5ClOC6H5ClOC6H5FO
Mr128.56128.56128.56112.10
Crystal system, space groupMonoclinic, P21/cMonoclinic, P21/cMonoclinic, P21/cMonoclinic, C2/c
Temperature (K)150150293150
a, b, c (Å)8.7086 (11), 15.4523 (19), 8.7414 (11)3.9724 (5), 12.7328 (17), 23.155 (3)4.1096 (4), 12.7665 (10), 23.181 (3)17.1336 (10), 8.2766 (5), 11.4975 (7)
α, β, γ (°)90, 93.954 (2), 9090, 94.126 (2), 9090, 94.201 (14), 9090, 100.234 (2), 90
V3)1173.5 (3)1168.2 (3)1212.9 (2)1604.50 (17)
Z88812
Radiation typeMo KαMo KαMo KαMo Kα
µ (mm1)0.530.540.520.12
Crystal size (mm)0.44 × 0.38 × 0.250.70 × 0.50 × 0.360.30 × 0.30 × 0.181.00 × 0.38 × 0.38
Data collection
DiffractometerBruker SMART
diffractometer
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
Bruker SMART
diffractometer
Absorption correctionMulti-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
Multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
Multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
Multi-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
Tmin, Tmax0.69, 0.880.49, 0.820.68, 0.910.575, 1.000
No. of measured, independent and
observed [I > 2σ(I)] reflections
7471, 2839, 2442 7449, 2843, 2219 7359, 711, 397 7505, 1957, 1302
Rint0.0240.0160.0630.021
θmax (°)28.828.923.228.7
(sin θ/λ)max1)0.6790.6800.5550.676
Refinement
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)], wR(F2), S 0.039, 0.101, 0.74 0.043, 0.110, 0.75 0.055, 0.160, 1.03 0.056, 0.111, 1.08
No. of reflections283928437101956
No. of parameters15215161125
No. of restraints226414
H-atom treatmentH atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinementH atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinementH-atom parameters not refinedH atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
Δρmax, Δρmin (e Å3)0.33, 0.310.44, 0.440.21, 0.200.32, 0.40
Absolute structure????
Absolute structure parameter????


(2F2P)
Crystal data
Chemical formulaC6H5FO
Mr112.10
Crystal system, space groupOrthorhombic, P212121
Temperature (K)403
a, b, c (Å)5.7168 (7), 9.9997 (19), 17.868 (2)
α, β, γ (°)90, 90, 90
V3)1021.4 (3)
Z8
Radiation typeMo Kα
µ (mm1)0.12
Crystal size (mm)0.30 × 0.30 × 0.18
Data collection
DiffractometerBruker SMART
diffractometer
Absorption correctionMulti-scan
SADABS (Siemens, 1996)
Tmin, Tmax0.96, 0.98
No. of measured, independent and
observed [I > 2σ(I)] reflections
3070, 469, 261
Rint0.099
θmax (°)23.3
(sin θ/λ)max1)0.555
Refinement
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)], wR(F2), S 0.083, 0.251, 0.94
No. of reflections461
No. of parameters62
No. of restraints64
H-atom treatmentH-atom parameters not refined
Δρmax, Δρmin (e Å3)0.27, 0.20
Absolute structureFlack, 0 Friedel-pairs
Absolute structure parameter2 (7)

Computer programs: SMART (Siemens, 1993), SAINT (Siemens ,1995), SHELXS 86 (Sheldrick, 1986), USER DEFINED STRUCTURE SOLUTION, SIR92 (Altomare et al., 1994), DASH, CRYSTALS (Betteridge et al. 2003), CAMERON (Watkin et al. 1996).

Selected geometric parameters (Å, º) for (3F) top
C1—C21.392 (3)C3—C41.376 (3)
C1—C61.387 (3)C3—F81.358 (4)
C1—O71.375 (2)C4—C51.380 (3)
C2—C31.382 (3)C5—C61.388 (3)
C2—C1—C6121.21 (17)C2—C3—F8117.8 (2)
C2—C1—O7121.4 (2)C4—C3—F8118.65 (19)
C6—C1—O7117.4 (2)C3—C4—C5117.87 (18)
C1—C2—C3117.1 (2)C4—C5—C6121.1 (2)
C2—C3—C4123.56 (19)C5—C6—C1119.22 (19)
Selected geometric parameters (Å, º) for (3FP) top
O7—C11.354 (15)C2—C31.39
F8—C31.331 (12)C3—C41.39
C1—C21.39C4—C51.39
C1—C61.39C5—C61.39
O7—C1—C2121.9 (3)C2—C3—C4120.00
O7—C1—C6118.1 (3)F8—C3—C4119.9 (4)
C2—C1—C6120.00C3—C4—C5120.00
C1—C2—C3120.00C4—C5—C6120.00
C2—C3—F8120.1 (4)C5—C6—C1120.00
Selected geometric parameters (Å, º) for (3CL) top
C11—C211.387 (9)C12—C221.374 (9)
C11—C611.384 (8)C12—C621.393 (8)
C11—O711.381 (8)C12—O721.368 (7)
C21—C311.382 (9)C22—C321.373 (8)
C31—C411.409 (8)C32—C421.396 (9)
C31—Cl811.727 (7)C32—Cl821.754 (7)
C41—C511.380 (10)C42—C521.381 (9)
C51—C611.385 (9)C52—C621.382 (9)
C21—C11—C61120.6 (7)C22—C12—C62120.2 (6)
C21—C11—O71116.9 (6)C22—C12—O72121.9 (6)
C61—C11—O71122.4 (6)C62—C12—O72117.9 (6)
C11—C21—C31119.0 (6)C12—C22—C32119.1 (6)
C21—C31—C41120.8 (6)C22—C32—C42122.4 (6)
C21—C31—Cl81119.1 (5)C22—C32—Cl82118.6 (6)
C41—C31—Cl81120.1 (5)C42—C32—Cl82118.9 (5)
C31—C41—C51119.0 (7)C32—C42—C52117.3 (6)
C41—C51—C61120.3 (7)C42—C52—C62121.5 (6)
C51—C61—C11120.0 (6)C12—C62—C52119.5 (6)
Selected geometric parameters (Å, º) for (3CLP) top
C11—C211.39C12—C221.39
C11—C611.39C12—C621.39
C11—O711.356 (4)C12—O721.361 (3)
C21—C311.39C22—C321.39
C31—C411.39C32—C421.39
C31—Cl811.715 (4)C32—Cl821.719 (4)
C41—C511.39C42—C521.39
C51—C611.39C52—C621.39
C21—C11—C61120.00C22—C12—C62120.00
C21—C11—O71121.37 (7)C22—C12—O72121.51 (7)
C61—C11—O71118.63 (7)C62—C12—O72118.48 (6)
C11—C21—C31120.00C12—C22—C32120.00
C21—C31—C41120.00C22—C32—C42120.00
C21—C31—Cl81118.95 (6)C22—C32—Cl82118.91 (6)
C41—C31—Cl81121.04 (6)C42—C32—Cl82121.06 (6)
C31—C41—C51120.00C32—C42—C52120.00
C41—C51—C61120.00C42—C52—C62120.00
C11—C61—C51120.00C12—C62—C52120.00
Selected geometric parameters (Å, º) for (4CL1) top
C11—C211.385 (2)C12—C221.387 (2)
C11—C611.383 (2)C12—C621.384 (2)
C11—O711.3795 (19)C12—O721.3750 (18)
C21—C311.385 (2)C22—C321.382 (2)
C31—C411.381 (2)C32—C421.380 (2)
C41—C511.381 (2)C42—C521.381 (2)
C41—Cl811.7433 (17)C42—Cl821.7416 (16)
C51—C611.385 (2)C52—C621.388 (2)
C21—C11—C61120.58 (15)C22—C12—C62120.43 (14)
C21—C11—O71117.49 (15)C22—C12—O72121.66 (14)
C61—C11—O71121.93 (14)C62—C12—O72117.92 (14)
C11—C21—C31119.74 (16)C12—C22—C32119.79 (15)
C21—C31—C41119.28 (15)C22—C32—C42119.52 (15)
C31—C41—C51121.33 (15)C32—C42—C52121.19 (15)
C31—C41—Cl81119.24 (13)C32—C42—Cl82119.11 (13)
C51—C41—Cl81119.42 (13)C52—C42—Cl82119.69 (13)
C41—C51—C61119.22 (15)C42—C52—C62119.23 (15)
C51—C61—C11119.85 (15)C52—C62—C12119.83 (14)
Selected geometric parameters (Å, º) for (4CL2) top
C11—C211.384 (3)C12—C221.382 (3)
C11—C611.385 (3)C12—C621.380 (3)
C11—O711.379 (2)C12—O721.377 (2)
C21—C311.382 (3)C22—C321.387 (3)
C31—C411.379 (3)C32—C421.378 (3)
C41—C511.380 (3)C42—C521.376 (3)
C41—Cl811.743 (2)C42—Cl821.744 (2)
C51—C611.380 (3)C52—C621.387 (3)
C21—C11—C61120.28 (19)C22—C12—C62120.86 (18)
C21—C11—O71121.95 (18)C22—C12—O72117.63 (18)
C61—C11—O71117.76 (18)C62—C12—O72121.52 (18)
C11—C21—C31119.77 (18)C12—C22—C32119.50 (19)
C21—C31—C41119.47 (18)C22—C32—C42119.26 (19)
C31—C41—C51121.20 (19)C32—C42—C52121.53 (19)
C31—C41—Cl81118.89 (16)C32—C42—Cl82119.43 (17)
C51—C41—Cl81119.90 (16)C52—C42—Cl82119.03 (17)
C41—C51—C61119.23 (18)C42—C52—C62119.19 (19)
C11—C61—C51120.04 (19)C52—C62—C12119.66 (19)
Selected geometric parameters (Å, º) for (4CL2P) top
C11—C211.39C12—C221.39
C11—C611.39C12—C621.39
C11—O711.418 (3)C12—O721.334 (2)
C21—C311.39C22—C321.39
C31—C411.39C32—C421.39
C41—C511.39C42—C521.39
C41—Cl811.699 (3)C42—Cl821.704 (2)
C51—C611.39C52—C621.39
C21—C11—C61120.00C22—C12—C62120.00
C21—C11—O71121.11 (7)C22—C12—O72119.39 (6)
C61—C11—O71118.89 (7)C62—C12—O72120.61 (6)
C11—C21—C31120.00C12—C22—C32120.00
C21—C31—C41120.00C22—C32—C42120.00
C31—C41—C51120.00C32—C42—C52120.00
C31—C41—Cl81120.08 (6)C32—C42—Cl82119.99 (7)
C51—C41—Cl81119.90 (6)C52—C42—Cl82119.99 (7)
C41—C51—C61120.00C42—C52—C62120.00
C11—C61—C51120.00C12—C62—C52120.00
Selected geometric parameters (Å, º) for (2F1) top
C11—C211.371 (3)C51—C611.386 (3)
C11—C611.375 (3)C12—C22i1.373 (2)
C11—O711.375 (2)C12—C221.373 (2)
C21—C311.378 (3)C12—O721.366 (4)
C21—F811.357 (2)C22—C321.372 (3)
C31—C411.372 (3)C22—F821.293 (3)
C41—C511.373 (4)C32—C421.371 (3)
C21—C11—C61118.51 (19)C51—C61—C11119.9 (2)
C21—C11—O71119.87 (19)C22i—C12—C22117.5 (3)
C61—C11—O71121.6 (2)C22i—C12—O72121.27 (14)
C11—C21—C31122.2 (2)C22—C12—O72121.27 (14)
C11—C21—F81117.86 (18)C12—C22—C32122.0 (2)
C31—C21—F81120.0 (2)C12—C22—F82121.7 (2)
C21—C31—C41118.9 (2)C32—C22—F82116.3 (2)
C31—C41—C51119.8 (2)C22—C32—C42119.1 (2)
C41—C51—C61120.7 (2)C32—C42—C32i120.5 (3)
Symmetry code: (i) x+1, y, z+3/2.
Selected geometric parameters (Å, º) for (2F2P) top
O71—C111.343 (2)C41—C511.39
F81—C211.283 (5)C51—C611.39
O72—C121.324 (2)C12—C221.39
F82—C221.303 (7)C12—C621.39
C11—C211.39C22—C321.39
C11—C611.39C32—C421.39
C21—C311.39C42—C521.39
C31—C411.39C52—C621.39
O71—C11—C21119.81 (6)O72—C12—C22119.74 (6)
O71—C11—C61120.19 (6)O72—C12—C62120.26 (6)
C21—C11—C61120.00C22—C12—C62120.00
C11—C21—F81120.20 (7)C12—C22—F82120.23 (7)
C11—C21—C31120.00C12—C22—C32120.00
F81—C21—C31119.80 (7)F82—C22—C32119.76 (7)
C21—C31—C41120.00C22—C32—C42120.00
C31—C41—C51120.00C32—C42—C52120.00
C41—C51—C61120.00C42—C52—C62120.00
C11—C61—C51120.00C52—C62—C12120.00
 

Footnotes

1Supplementary data for this paper are available from the IUCr electronic archives (Reference: BS5012 ). Services for accessing these data are described at the back of the journal.

Acknowledgements

We thank the EPSRC, the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre and the University of Edinburgh for funding.

References

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