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Journal logoSTRUCTURAL
CHEMISTRY
ISSN: 2053-2296

Bis(4-methyl­benzyl­ammonium) tetra­chloridozincate: a new noncentrosymmetric structure characterized by 13C CP–MAS NMR spectroscopy

aLaboratoire de Chimie des Matériaux, Faculté des Sciences de Bizerte, 7021 Zarzouna, Tunisia, bUniverstié Lyon 1, Centre de Diffractométrie Henri Longchambon, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, France, and cLaboratoire de Chimie Organométallique de Surface (LCOMS), École Supérieure de Chimie Physique Électronique, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, France
*Correspondence e-mail: cherif_bennasr@yahoo.fr

(Received 24 February 2011; accepted 2 April 2011; online 13 April 2011)

A new noncentrosymmetric organic–inorganic hybrid material, (C8H12N)2[ZnCl4], has been synthesized as single crystals at room temperature and characterized by X-ray diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Its novel structure consists of two 4-methyl­benzyl­ammonium cations and one [ZnCl4]2− anion connected by N—H⋯Cl and C—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds, two of which are three-centre inter­actions. The ZnII metal centre has a slightly distorted tetra­hedral coordination geometry. Results from 13C CP–MAS NMR spectroscopy are in good agreement with the X-ray structure. Density functional theory calculations allow the assignment of the carbon peaks to the independent crystallographic sites.

Comment

Organic–inorganic hybrid materials having a noncentrosymmetric structure are inter­esting for their applications in various fields such as quadratic nonlinear optical materials research (Masse et al., 1993[Masse, R., Bagieu-Beucher, M., Pecaut, J., Levy, J. P. & Zyss, J. (1993). Nonlinear Opt. 5, 413-423.]). Structural investigation of the tetra­halometallate anions of the metals of the first transition series with different counter-cations is of inter­est because of their large structural variabilities (Smith, 1976[Smith, D. W. (1976). Coord. Chem. Rev. 21, 93-158.]). Hybrid d10-metal halides have been found to exhibit important structural properties because of their wide range of stereochemical features, such as distorted tetra­hedral (Bhattacharya et al., 2002[Bhattacharya, R., Sinha Ray, M., Dey, R., Righi, L., Bocelli, G. & Ghosh, A. (2002). Polyhedron, 21, 2561-2565.]), square-pyramidal (Antolini et al., 1980[Antolini, L., Marcotrigiano, G., Menabue, L. & Pellacani, G. C. (1980). J. Am. Chem. Soc. 102, 1303-1309.]) and trigonal–bipyramidal (Raymond et al., 1968[Raymond, K. N., Meek, D. W. & Ibers, J. A. (1968). Inorg. Chem. 7, 1111-1117.]) geometries. As a contribution to the investigation of the above materials, we report here the crystal structure of one such compound, bis(4-methyl­benzyl­ammonium) tetra­chloridozincate, (I)[link], formed from the reaction of 4-methyl­benzyl­amine and zinc chloride.

The asymmetric unit of (I)[link] comprises two 4-methyl­benzyl­ammonium cations and a [ZnCl4]2− anion (Fig. 1[link]). The crystal structure of this material consists of a network of the constituent cations and anions connected by N—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds, two of which are three-centre inter­actions, viz. N15—H152⋯(Cl2,Cl5) and N15—H153⋯(Cl2ii,Cl5i) (details and symmetry codes in Table 1[link]). Multiple hydrogen bonds connect the different entities of (I)[link] to form layers, built up from the [ZnCl4]2− anions and the ammonium groups, parallel to the ac plane (Fig. 2[link]). Fig. 3[link] shows that two such layers cross the unit cell at z = 0 and z = [{1 \over 2}], and the bodies of the organic groups are located between these layers and connect them via weak C—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds. The organic mol­ecule exhibits a regular spatial configuration with normal C—C and C—N distances and C—C—C and C—C—N angles (El Glaoui et al., 2010[El Glaoui, M., Jeanneau, E., Lefebvre, F. & Ben Nasr, C. (2010). Struct. Chem. Commun. 1, 75-80.]). No ππ stacking inter­actions between the phenyl­ene rings or C—H⋯π inter­actions towards them are observed.

[Scheme 1]

Previous studies [see, for example, Guo et al. (2007[Guo, N., Yi, J., Chen, Y., Liao, S. & Fu, Z. (2007). Acta Cryst. E63, m2571.])] have showed that, in the [ZnCl4]2− anion, the Zn—Cl bond lengths and Cl—Zn—Cl bond angles are not equal, but vary with the environment around the Cl atom. In complex (I)[link], the Zn—Cl bond lengths vary between 2.2564 (17) and 2.2841 (14) Å, and the Cl—Zn—Cl angles range from 104.28 (6) to 115.70 (6)°. Owing to these differences in the geometric parameters, the [ZnCl4]2− anion has a slightly distorted tetra­hedral stereochemistry (as in Guo et al., 2007[Guo, N., Yi, J., Chen, Y., Liao, S. & Fu, Z. (2007). Acta Cryst. E63, m2571.]). In (I)[link], since atom Cl4 is involved in a strong N—H⋯Cl hydrogen bond (H⋯Cl = 2.30 Å), the Zn1—Cl4 bond is obviously longer than the other Zn—Cl bonds (Table 1[link]).

Refining the structure in the noncentrosymmetric space group gives a value of 0.00 (2) for the Flack parameter (Flack & Bernardinelli, 1999[Flack, H. D. & Bernardinelli, G. (1999). Acta Cryst. A55, 908-915.]), confirming that the direction of the polar axis has been correctly determined.

The 13C CP–MAS NMR spectrum of crystalline (I)[link] is shown in Fig. 4[link]. In the aliphatic resonance domain, the spectrum displays four resonances corresponding to two methyl and two methyl­ene C atoms. This result is consistent with the presence of two organic moieties in the asymmetric unit of the compound, in agreement with the X-ray diffraction data. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were undertaken in order to assign the NMR resonances to the different crystallographically non-equivalent C atoms of the unit cell. These calculations were made at the B3LYP/6-31+G* level using the GAUSSIAN98 program (Frisch et al., 1998[Frisch, M. J., et al. (1998). GAUSSIAN98. Gaussian Inc., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.]). Three different calculations were made on the two non-equivalent organic cations in the unit cell and in all cases the theoretical chemical shifts were subtracted from those of the reference (tetra­methyl­silane) calculated at the same level of theory. Firstly, calculation of the NMR chemical shifts [with the Gauga-Independent Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method] by taking the geometry obtained from X-ray diffraction. Secondlt, optimization of the positions of the H atoms in the mol­ecule and calculation of the NMR chemical shifts in this semi-optimized geometry. (X-ray diffraction always leads to underestimated X—H bond lengths, due to the fact that it is sensitive to the electron cloud and does not see the nuclei.) Thirdly, full optimization of all atoms and calculation of NMR chemical shifts. This calculation, compared with that above, will give indications of the steric hindrance around the organic cation and the positions where it is the strongest. The results are listed in Table 2[link]. Clearly, there is a very good agreement between the experimental and theoretical values calculated after optimization of the H-atom positions, allowing the unambiguous assignment of the different NMR signals to the various C atoms of the structure.

In conclusion, compound (I)[link] was prepared as single crystals at room temperature and characterized by two physicochemical methods. On the structural level, the atomic arrangement of this material consists of a network of 4-methyl­benzyl­ammonium cations and tetra­chloridozincate anions connected by N—H⋯Cl and C—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds. The number of 13C CP–MAS NMR components is in full agreement with those of the crystallographically independent sites.

[Figure 1]
Figure 1
A view of (I)[link], showing the atomic numbering scheme. Displacement ellipsoids are drawn at 50% probability level.
[Figure 2]
Figure 2
A projection, along the b axis, of a layer in the structure of (I)[link], showing the N—H⋯Cl hydrogen-bonding inter­actions (dashed lines). Only the ammonium and tetra­chloridozincate (tetrahedra) sections are shown, for clarity.
[Figure 3]
Figure 3
A projection of the structure of (I)[link] along the c axis. Hydrogen bonds are denoted as dashed lines.
[Figure 4]
Figure 4
13C CP–MAS NMR spectrum of (C8H11N)2[ZnCl4].

Experimental

A mixture of 2-amino-5-chloro­pyridine (3 mmol, 0.385 g), zinc chloride (1.5 mmol, 0.297 g) and HCl (10 ml, 0.3 M) in water (10 ml) was placed in a Petri dish and allowed to evaporate slowly at room temperature. Colourless single crystals of the title compound, (I)[link], were isolated after several days (yield 54%). The 13C CP–MAS NMR spectrum was recorded on a solid-state high-resolution Bruker DSX300 spectrometer operating at 75.49 MHz for 13C, with a classical 4 mm probe head allowing spinning rates up to 10 kHz. The chemical shifts are given relative to tetra­methyl­silane (external reference, precision 0.5 p.p.m.). The spectrum was recorded by use of cross-polarization (CP) from protons (contact time 5 ms) and MAS. It was checked that there was a sufficient delay between scans to allow full relaxation of the nuclei.

Crystal data
  • (C8H12N)2[ZnCl4]

  • Mr = 451.57

  • Orthorhombic, P n a 21

  • a = 10.6623 (8) Å

  • b = 25.395 (2) Å

  • c = 7.4167 (5) Å

  • V = 2008.2 (3) Å3

  • Z = 4

  • Mo Kα radiation

  • μ = 1.76 mm−1

  • T = 110 K

  • 0.26 × 0.17 × 0.09 mm

Data collection
  • Agilent Gemini CCD area-detector diffractometer

  • Absorption correction: analytical [CrysAlis PRO (Agilent Technologies, 2010[Agilent Technologies (2010). CrysAlis PRO. Version 1.171.34.46. Agilent Technologies, Yarnton, Oxfordshire, England.]), based on expressions derived by Clark & Reid (1995[Clark, R. C. & Reid, J. S. (1995). Acta Cryst. A51, 887-897.])] Tmin = 0.692, Tmax = 0.866

  • 26378 measured reflections

  • 5120 independent reflections

  • 4699 reflections with I > 2σ(I)

  • Rint = 0.061

Refinement
  • R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.066

  • wR(F2) = 0.143

  • S = 0.92

  • 5120 reflections

  • 210 parameters

  • 1 restraint

  • H-atom parameters constrained

  • Δρmax = 1.10 e Å−3

  • Δρmin = −1.36 e Å−3

  • Absolute structure: Flack & Bernardinelli (1999[Flack, H. D. & Bernardinelli, G. (1999). Acta Cryst. A55, 908-915.]), with 2877 Friedel pairs

  • Flack parameter: 0.00 (2)

Table 1
Hydrogen-bond geometry (Å, °)

D—H⋯A D—H H⋯A DA D—H⋯A
N15—H153⋯Cl5i 0.89 2.69 3.417 (5) 138
N15—H153⋯Cl2ii 0.89 2.78 3.445 (5) 132
N15—H152⋯Cl2 0.89 2.69 3.262 (5) 122
N15—H152⋯Cl5 0.89 2.77 3.552 (5) 146
N15—H151⋯Cl3i 0.89 2.40 3.242 (5) 155
N6—H61⋯Cl4iii 0.88 2.57 3.274 (6) 136
N6—H62⋯Cl2iii 0.89 2.50 3.315 (6) 151
N6—H63⋯Cl4iv 0.89 2.30 3.171 (5) 163
C7—H72⋯Cl3iv 0.96 2.81 3.459 (7) 125
C7—H71⋯Cl5v 0.97 2.92 3.711 (6) 139
C16—H161⋯Cl4vi 0.97 2.88 3.824 (8) 162
C16—H162⋯Cl3ii 0.97 2.82 3.636 (8) 142
Symmetry codes: (i) [-x, -y+1, z+{\script{1\over 2}}]; (ii) [-x, -y+1, z-{\script{1\over 2}}]; (iii) [x+{\script{1\over 2}}, -y+{\script{3\over 2}}, z]; (iv) [-x-{\script{1\over 2}}, y+{\script{1\over 2}}, z+{\script{1\over 2}}]; (v) [x+{\script{1\over 2}}, -y+{\script{3\over 2}}, z+1]; (vi) x+1, y, z.

Table 2
Calculated and experimental carbon-13 chemical shifts in (C8H11N)2[ZnCl4]

Atom No optimization Optimization of all atoms Optimization of protons Experimental
C12 1.6 23.1 23.4 21.85
C7 28.2 56.1 45.2 45.23
C11 143.4 147.2 142.2 139.1
C13 120 129.1 125.3 129.38
C14 118.3 124.2 123.7 129.38
C8 114.1 116.1 113.9 128.32
C9 113.2 124.2 119.7 128.32
C10 121.7 129.1 126.6 129.38
C23 0.9 23.1 23.0 21.41
C16 28.1 56.1 44.1 44.72
C20 143 147.2 141.2 138.3
C21 121.4 129.1 126.2 129.38
C22 108.9 124.2 112.9 128.32
C17 112.3 116.1 112.3 128.32
C18 114.1 124.2 121.9 129.38
C19 120.8 129.1 126.1 129.38

All H atoms were located in a difference map. They were initially refined with soft restraints on the bond lengths and angles to regularize their geometry, with C—H = 0.93–0.98 Å and N—H = 0.86–0.89 Å, and with Uiso(H) = 1.2–1.5Ueq(parent atom), after which the positions were refined with riding constraints. Software and methods used for extinction correction and weighting scheme: Larson (1970[Larson, A. C. (1970). Crystallographic Computing, edited by F. R. Ahmed, S. R. Hall & C. P. Huber, pp. 291-294. Copenhagen: Munksgaard.]); Prince (1982[Prince, E. (1982). In Mathematical Techniques in Crystallography and Materials Science. New York: Springer-Verlag.]); Watkin (1994[Watkin, D. (1994). Acta Cryst. A50, 411-437.]).

Data collection: CrysAlis PRO (Agilent Technologies, 2010[Agilent Technologies (2010). CrysAlis PRO. Version 1.171.34.46. Agilent Technologies, Yarnton, Oxfordshire, England.]); cell refinement: CrysAlis PRO; data reduction: CrysAlis PRO; program(s) used to solve structure: SIR97 (Altomare et al., 1999[Altomare, A., Burla, M. C., Camalli, M., Cascarano, G. L., Giacovazzo, C., Guagliardi, A., Moliterni, A. G. G., Polidori, G. & Spagna, R. (1999). J. Appl. Cryst. 32, 115-119.]); program(s) used to refine structure: CRYSTALS (Betteridge et al., 2003[Betteridge, P. W., Carruthers, J. R., Cooper, R. I., Prout, K. & Watkin, D. J. (2003). J. Appl. Cryst. 36, 1487.]); molecular graphics: CAMERON (Watkin et al., 1996[Watkin, D. J., Prout, C. K. & Pearce, L. J. (1996). CAMERON. Chemical Crystallography Laboratory, Oxford, England.]); software used to prepare material for publication: CRYSTALS.

Supporting information


Comment top

Organic–inorganic hybrid materials having a noncentrosymmetric structure are interesting for their applications in various fields such as quadratic nonlinear optical materials research (Masse et al., 1993). Structural investigation of the tetrahalometallate anions of the metals of the first transition series with different countercations is of interest because of their large structural variabilities (Smith, 1976). Hybrid d10-metal halides have been found to exhibit important structural properties because of their wide range of stereochemical features, such as distorted tetrahedral (Bhattacharya et al., 2002), square-pyramidal (Antolini et al., 1980) and trigonal–bipyramidal (Raymond et al., 1968) geometries. As a contribution to the investigation of the above materials, we report here the crystal structure of one such compound, (C8H11N)2[ZnCl4], (I), formed from the reaction of 4-methylbenzylamine and zinc chloride.

The asymmetric unit of (I) comprises two 4-methylbenzylammonium cations and a [ZnCl4]2- anion (Fig. 1). The crystal structure of this material consists of a network of the constituent 4-methylbenzylammonium cations and [ZnCl4]2- anions connected by N—H···Cl hydrogen bonds, two of which are three-centre interactions, N15—H152···(Cl2,Cl5) and N15—H153···(Cl2,Cl5) (Table 1). Multiple hydrogen bonds connect the different entities of (I) to form layers, built up from the [ZnCl4]2- anions and the ammonium groups, parallel to the ac plane (Fig. 2). Fig 3 shows that two such layers cross the unit cell at z = 0 and z = 1/2, and the bodies of the organic groups are located between these layers and connect them via weak C—H···Cl hydrogen bonds. The organic molecule exhibits a regular spatial configuration with normal C—C and C—N distances and C—C—C and C—C—N angles [Standard reference?]. No ππ stacking interactions between the phenylene rings or C—H···π interactions towards them are observed.

Previous studies [References?] showed that, in the [ZnCl4]2- anion, the Zn—Cl bond lengths and Cl—Zn—Cl bond angles are not equal, but vary with the environment around the Cl atom. In complex (I), the Zn—Cl bond lengths vary between 2.2568 (18) and 2.2842 (14) Å, and the Cl—Zn—Cl angles range from 104.28 (7) to 115.71 (7)°. Owing to these differences in the geometric parameters, the [ZnCl4]2- anion has a slightly distorted tetrahedral stereochemistry (as in Guo et al., 2007). In (I), since atom Cl4 is involved in a strong N—H···Cl hydrogen bond (H···Cl = 2.30 Å), the Zn—Cl4 bond is obviously longer than Zn—Cl2, Zn—Cl3 and Zn—Cl4 (Table 1).

Refining the structure in the noncentrosymmetric space group gives a value of 0.00 (2) for the Flack parameter (Flack & Bernardinelli, 1999). This value confirms that the direction of the polar axis is correctly determined.

The 13C CP–MAS NMR spectrum of crystalline (I) is shown in Fig. 4. In the aliphatic resonance domain, the spectrum displays four resonances corresponding to two methyl and two methylene C atoms. This result is consistent with the presence of two organic moieties in the asymmetric unit of the compound, in agreement with the X-ray diffraction data. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were undertaken in order to assign the NMR resonances to the different crystallographically non-quivalent C atoms of the unit cell. These calculations were made at the B3LYP/6-31+G* level using the GAUSSIAN98 software (Frisch et al., 1998). Three different calculations were made on the two non-equivalent organic cations in the unit cell and in all cases the theoretical chemical shifts were subtracted from those of the reference (tetramethylsilane) calculated at the same level of theory. (1) Calculation of the NMR chemical shifts (with the GIAO method [define acronym?]) by taking the geometry obtained from X-ray diffraction. (2) Optimization of the positions of the H atoms in the molecule and calculation of the NMR chemical shifts in this semi-optimized geometry. (X-ray diffraction always leads to underestimated X—H bond lengths, due to the fact that it is sensitive to the electron cloud and does not see the nuclei.) (3) Full optimization of all atoms and calculation of NMR chemical shifts. This calculation, compared with that above, will give indications of the steric hindrance around the organic cation and the positions where it is the strongest. The results are listed in Table 2. Clearly, there is a very good agreement between the experimental and theoretical values calculated after optimization of the H-atom positions, allowing the unambiguous assignment of the different NMR signals to the various C atoms of the structure.

In conclusion, compound (I) was prepared as single crystals at room temperature and characterized by two physicochemical methods. On the structural level, the atomic arrangement of this material consists of a network of 4-methylbenzylyammonium cations and tetrachloridozincate anions connected by N—H···Cl and C—H···Cl hydrogen bonds. The number of 13C CP–MAS NMR components is in full agreement with those of the crystallographically independent sites.

Related literature top

For related literature, see: Antolini et al. (1980); Bhattacharya et al. (2002); Flack & Bernardinelli (1999); Frisch (1998); Guo et al. (2007); Larson (1970); Masse et al. (1993); Prince (1982); Raymond et al. (1968); Smith (1976); Watkin (1994).

Experimental top

A mixture of 2-amino-5-chloropyridine (3 mmol, 0.385 g), zinc chloride (1.5 mmol, 0.297 g) and HCl (10 ml, 0.3 M) in water (Volume?) was placed in a Petri dish and allowed to evaporate slowly at room temperature. Colourless single crystals of the title compound, (I), were isolated after several days (yield 54%). The 13C CP–MAS NMR spectrum was recorded on a solid-state high-resolution Bruker DSX300 spectrometer operating at 75.49 MHz for 13C, with a classical 4 mm probe head allowing spinning rates up to 10 kHz. The chemical shifts are given relative to tetramethylsilane (external reference, precision 0.5 p.p.m.). The spectrum was recorded by use of cross-polarization (CP) from protons (contact time 5 ms) and MAS. It was checked that there was a sufficient delay between scans to allow full relaxation of the nuclei.

Refinement top

All H atoms were located in a difference map. They were initially refined with soft restraints on the bond lengths and angles to regularize their geometry, with C—H = 0.93–0.98 and N—H = 0.86–0.89 Å, and with Uiso(H) = 1.2–1.5Ueq(parent atom), after which the positions were refined with riding constraints. Software and methods used for extinction correction and weighting scheme: Larson (1970); Prince (1982); Watkin (1994).

Computing details top

Data collection: CrysAlis PRO (Agilent Technologies, 2010); cell refinement: CrysAlis PRO (Agilent Technologies, 2010); data reduction: CrysAlis PRO (Agilent Technologies, 2010); program(s) used to solve structure: SIR97 (Altomare et al., 1999); program(s) used to refine structure: CRYSTALS (Betteridge et al., 2003); molecular graphics: CAMERON (Watkin et al., 1996); software used to prepare material for publication: CRYSTALS (Betteridge et al., 2003).

Figures top
[Figure 1] Fig. 1. A view of (I), showing the atomic numbering scheme. Displacement ellipsoids are drawn at 50% probability level.
[Figure 2] Fig. 2. A projection, along the b axis, of a layer in the structure of (I), showing the N—H···Cl hydrogen-bonding interactions (dashed lines). Only the ammonium and tetrachloridozincate sections are shown, for clarity.
[Figure 3] Fig. 3. A projection of the structure of (I) along the c axis. Hydrogen bonds are denoted as dashed lines.
[Figure 4] Fig. 4. 13C CP–MAS NMR spectrum of (C8H11N)2[ZnCl4].
Bis(4-methylbenzylammonium) tetrachloridozincate top
Crystal data top
(C8H12N)2[ZnCl4]F(000) = 928
Mr = 451.57Dx = 1.493 Mg m3
Orthorhombic, Pna21Mo Kα radiation, λ = 0.7107 Å
Hall symbol: P 2c -2nCell parameters from 11472 reflections
a = 10.6623 (8) Åθ = 3.3–29.6°
b = 25.395 (2) ŵ = 1.76 mm1
c = 7.4167 (5) ÅT = 110 K
V = 2008.2 (3) Å3Needle, colourless
Z = 40.26 × 0.17 × 0.09 mm
Data collection top
Make? Model? CCD area-detector
diffractometer
5120 independent reflections
Radiation source: Enhance (Mo) X-ray source4699 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.061
Detector resolution: 10.4685 pixels mm-1θmax = 29.6°, θmin = 3.4°
ω scansh = 1414
Absorption correction: analytical
[CrysAlis PRO (Agilent Technologies, 2010), based on expressions derived by Clark & Reid (1995)]
k = 3433
Tmin = 0.692, Tmax = 0.866l = 1010
26378 measured reflections
Refinement top
Refinement on F2H-atom parameters constrained
Least-squares matrix: full Method, part 1, Chebychev polynomial, (Watkin, 1994, Prince, 1982) [weight] = 1.0/[A0*T0(x) + A1*T1(x) ··· + An-1]*Tn-1(x)]
where Ai are the Chebychev coefficients listed below and x = F /Fmax Method = Robust Weighting (Prince, 1982) W = [weight] * [1-(deltaF/6*sigmaF)2]2 Ai are: 0.168E + 04 0.269E + 04 0.142E + 04 428.
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.066(Δ/σ)max = 0.001
wR(F2) = 0.143Δρmax = 1.10 e Å3
S = 0.92Δρmin = 1.36 e Å3
5120 reflectionsExtinction correction: Larson (1970), Equation 22
210 parametersExtinction coefficient: 40 (5)
1 restraintAbsolute structure: Flack & Bernardinelli (1999), with 2877 Friedel pairs
Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methodsAbsolute structure parameter: 0.00 (2)
Hydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
Crystal data top
(C8H12N)2[ZnCl4]V = 2008.2 (3) Å3
Mr = 451.57Z = 4
Orthorhombic, Pna21Mo Kα radiation
a = 10.6623 (8) ŵ = 1.76 mm1
b = 25.395 (2) ÅT = 110 K
c = 7.4167 (5) Å0.26 × 0.17 × 0.09 mm
Data collection top
Make? Model? CCD area-detector
diffractometer
5120 independent reflections
Absorption correction: analytical
[CrysAlis PRO (Agilent Technologies, 2010), based on expressions derived by Clark & Reid (1995)]
4699 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Tmin = 0.692, Tmax = 0.866Rint = 0.061
26378 measured reflections
Refinement top
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.066H-atom parameters constrained
wR(F2) = 0.143Δρmax = 1.10 e Å3
S = 0.92Δρmin = 1.36 e Å3
5120 reflectionsAbsolute structure: Flack & Bernardinelli (1999), with 2877 Friedel pairs
210 parametersAbsolute structure parameter: 0.00 (2)
1 restraint
Special details top

Experimental. CrysAlisPro, Agilent Technologies, Version 1.171.34.46 (release 25-11-2010 CrysAlis171 .NET) (compiled Nov 25 2010,17:55:46) Analytical numeric absorption correction using a multifaceted crystal model based on expressions derived by Clark & Reid (1995).

Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
Zn10.25524 (5)0.52545 (2)0.28711 (18)0.0233
Cl20.16343 (13)0.55061 (5)0.5498 (2)0.0288
Cl30.24612 (14)0.43815 (6)0.2302 (3)0.0313
Cl40.46200 (12)0.54629 (5)0.3245 (2)0.0310
Cl50.15744 (14)0.56572 (5)0.0552 (2)0.0315
N60.0648 (6)0.9308 (2)0.7572 (8)0.0401
C70.0290 (6)0.8918 (2)0.8942 (9)0.0340
C80.0207 (5)0.8370 (2)0.8228 (7)0.0244
C90.1178 (5)0.8148 (2)0.7239 (8)0.0294
C100.1116 (6)0.7629 (3)0.6722 (8)0.0304
C110.0101 (5)0.7312 (2)0.7181 (8)0.0263
C120.0092 (8)0.6739 (2)0.6660 (9)0.0401
H1220.05720.65610.72810.0621*
H1210.00300.67070.53830.0622*
H1230.08780.65810.69900.0620*
C130.0867 (5)0.7542 (2)0.8144 (8)0.0262
C140.0829 (5)0.8066 (2)0.8660 (7)0.0233
H1410.15030.82120.92880.0290*
H1310.15640.73370.84520.0321*
H1010.17780.74870.60520.0372*
H910.18750.83500.69250.0359*
H720.05220.90180.94140.0400*
H710.09050.89290.99050.0401*
H630.04700.96330.79570.0609*
H620.14690.92850.73630.0612*
H610.02310.92430.65600.0611*
N150.1067 (4)0.55183 (18)0.3432 (7)0.0282
C160.1947 (7)0.5751 (2)0.2126 (10)0.0378
C170.2060 (6)0.6339 (2)0.2313 (8)0.0268
C180.3089 (5)0.6559 (2)0.3199 (8)0.0258
C190.3232 (5)0.7100 (2)0.3265 (8)0.0298
C200.2379 (5)0.7433 (2)0.2461 (8)0.0255
C210.1342 (6)0.7213 (2)0.1611 (8)0.0287
C220.1191 (6)0.6673 (2)0.1521 (8)0.0256
H2210.04990.65320.09150.0322*
H2110.07390.74350.10890.0350*
C230.2526 (7)0.8027 (2)0.2487 (10)0.0385
H2310.17280.81920.27160.0582*
H2330.28400.81470.13460.0582*
H2320.31100.81240.34270.0581*
H1910.39200.72420.38620.0360*
H1810.36840.63420.37370.0318*
H1620.16570.56640.09230.0452*
H1610.27690.55940.23130.0451*
H1530.11100.51680.33580.0430*
H1520.02880.56190.31630.0430*
H1510.12580.56200.45520.0433*
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
Zn10.0235 (3)0.0192 (3)0.0272 (3)0.00026 (18)0.0020 (2)0.0006 (3)
Cl20.0302 (6)0.0279 (6)0.0284 (6)0.0023 (5)0.0017 (5)0.0056 (6)
Cl30.0433 (8)0.0205 (6)0.0300 (7)0.0022 (5)0.0012 (5)0.0019 (5)
Cl40.0246 (6)0.0285 (6)0.0399 (8)0.0028 (4)0.0000 (6)0.0034 (5)
Cl50.0350 (7)0.0233 (6)0.0362 (7)0.0021 (5)0.0085 (6)0.0013 (6)
N60.051 (3)0.026 (2)0.043 (3)0.002 (2)0.017 (3)0.005 (2)
C70.035 (3)0.032 (3)0.035 (3)0.003 (2)0.000 (3)0.004 (2)
C80.026 (2)0.024 (2)0.024 (2)0.0008 (18)0.001 (2)0.003 (2)
C90.023 (2)0.032 (3)0.033 (3)0.000 (2)0.006 (2)0.006 (2)
C100.025 (3)0.041 (3)0.025 (2)0.004 (2)0.003 (2)0.007 (2)
C110.030 (2)0.023 (2)0.026 (2)0.004 (2)0.006 (2)0.000 (2)
C120.057 (4)0.024 (3)0.039 (3)0.003 (3)0.004 (3)0.009 (2)
C130.025 (2)0.026 (2)0.028 (3)0.0008 (19)0.003 (2)0.000 (2)
C140.027 (2)0.023 (2)0.019 (2)0.003 (2)0.0000 (18)0.0012 (19)
N150.031 (2)0.021 (2)0.033 (3)0.0001 (17)0.005 (2)0.0017 (18)
C160.045 (3)0.027 (3)0.041 (3)0.004 (3)0.017 (3)0.000 (3)
C170.033 (3)0.024 (2)0.024 (2)0.001 (2)0.008 (2)0.001 (2)
C180.031 (2)0.021 (2)0.025 (2)0.0031 (19)0.000 (2)0.000 (2)
C190.027 (2)0.035 (3)0.027 (3)0.005 (2)0.003 (2)0.005 (2)
C200.029 (2)0.020 (2)0.028 (3)0.0006 (18)0.002 (2)0.001 (2)
C210.034 (3)0.024 (2)0.029 (3)0.002 (2)0.001 (2)0.004 (2)
C220.030 (2)0.021 (2)0.026 (2)0.004 (2)0.003 (2)0.0010 (19)
C230.053 (4)0.022 (3)0.040 (4)0.003 (2)0.002 (3)0.001 (3)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
Zn1—Cl22.2720 (17)C13—H1310.935
Zn1—Cl32.2591 (15)C14—H1410.932
Zn1—Cl42.2841 (14)N15—C161.472 (7)
Zn1—Cl52.2564 (17)N15—H1530.893
N6—C71.469 (8)N15—H1520.891
N6—H630.894N15—H1510.894
N6—H620.890C16—C171.506 (8)
N6—H610.888C16—H1620.970
C7—C81.491 (8)C16—H1610.972
C7—H720.967C17—C181.395 (8)
C7—H710.970C17—C221.387 (8)
C8—C91.389 (7)C18—C191.383 (7)
C8—C141.385 (7)C18—H1810.930
C9—C101.375 (8)C19—C201.378 (8)
C9—H910.932C19—H1910.930
C10—C111.392 (8)C20—C211.391 (8)
C10—H1010.935C20—C231.517 (8)
C11—C121.505 (8)C21—C221.380 (7)
C11—C131.384 (8)C21—H2110.940
C12—H1220.959C22—H2210.936
C12—H1210.959C23—H2310.964
C12—H1230.961C23—H2330.959
C13—C141.387 (7)C23—H2320.966
Cl2—Zn1—Cl3114.69 (6)C13—C14—C8119.7 (5)
Cl2—Zn1—Cl4104.28 (6)C13—C14—H141119.7
Cl3—Zn1—Cl4106.95 (6)C8—C14—H141120.7
Cl2—Zn1—Cl5109.09 (6)C16—N15—H153109.0
Cl3—Zn1—Cl5106.40 (6)C16—N15—H152109.4
Cl4—Zn1—Cl5115.70 (6)H153—N15—H152108.7
C7—N6—H63110.3C16—N15—H151110.5
C7—N6—H62109.4H153—N15—H151109.5
H63—N6—H62108.9H152—N15—H151109.8
C7—N6—H61109.3N15—C16—C17112.8 (5)
H63—N6—H61109.5N15—C16—H162108.1
H62—N6—H61109.4C17—C16—H162109.6
N6—C7—C8113.5 (5)N15—C16—H161108.5
N6—C7—H72107.8C17—C16—H161108.7
C8—C7—H72108.7H162—C16—H161109.0
N6—C7—H71108.3C16—C17—C18120.2 (6)
C8—C7—H71109.2C16—C17—C22121.0 (6)
H72—C7—H71109.4C18—C17—C22118.7 (5)
C7—C8—C9121.5 (5)C17—C18—C19120.1 (5)
C7—C8—C14119.0 (5)C17—C18—H181120.1
C9—C8—C14119.4 (5)C19—C18—H181119.8
C8—C9—C10120.1 (5)C18—C19—C20121.5 (5)
C8—C9—H91120.2C18—C19—H191119.3
C10—C9—H91119.8C20—C19—H191119.2
C9—C10—C11121.6 (5)C19—C20—C21118.2 (5)
C9—C10—H101118.8C19—C20—C23122.5 (5)
C11—C10—H101119.6C21—C20—C23119.2 (5)
C10—C11—C12120.0 (6)C20—C21—C22120.9 (6)
C10—C11—C13117.6 (5)C20—C21—H211119.2
C12—C11—C13122.4 (6)C22—C21—H211119.8
C11—C12—H122109.7C17—C22—C21120.6 (6)
C11—C12—H121109.7C17—C22—H221119.6
H122—C12—H121109.5C21—C22—H221119.8
C11—C12—H123109.5C20—C23—H231110.1
H122—C12—H123108.9C20—C23—H233109.8
H121—C12—H123109.5H231—C23—H233109.0
C11—C13—C14121.7 (5)C20—C23—H232109.2
C11—C13—H131119.0H231—C23—H232109.3
C14—C13—H131119.3H233—C23—H232109.4
Hydrogen-bond geometry (Å, º) top
D—H···AD—HH···AD···AD—H···A
N15—H153···Cl5i0.892.693.417 (5)138
N15—H153···Cl2ii0.892.783.445 (5)132
N15—H152···Cl20.892.693.262 (5)122
N15—H152···Cl50.892.773.552 (5)146
N15—H151···Cl3i0.892.403.242 (5)155
N6—H61···Cl4iii0.882.573.274 (6)136
N6—H62···Cl2iii0.892.503.315 (6)151
N6—H63···Cl4iv0.892.303.171 (5)163
C7—H72···Cl3iv0.962.813.459 (7)125
C7—H71···Cl5v0.972.923.711 (6)139
C16—H161···Cl4vi0.972.883.824 (8)162
C16—H162···Cl3ii0.972.823.636 (8)142
Symmetry codes: (i) x, y+1, z+1/2; (ii) x, y+1, z1/2; (iii) x+1/2, y+3/2, z; (iv) x1/2, y+1/2, z+1/2; (v) x+1/2, y+3/2, z+1; (vi) x+1, y, z.

Experimental details

Crystal data
Chemical formula(C8H12N)2[ZnCl4]
Mr451.57
Crystal system, space groupOrthorhombic, Pna21
Temperature (K)110
a, b, c (Å)10.6623 (8), 25.395 (2), 7.4167 (5)
V3)2008.2 (3)
Z4
Radiation typeMo Kα
µ (mm1)1.76
Crystal size (mm)0.26 × 0.17 × 0.09
Data collection
DiffractometerMake? Model? CCD area-detector
diffractometer
Absorption correctionAnalytical
[CrysAlis PRO (Agilent Technologies, 2010), based on expressions derived by Clark & Reid (1995)]
Tmin, Tmax0.692, 0.866
No. of measured, independent and
observed [I > 2σ(I)] reflections
26378, 5120, 4699
Rint0.061
(sin θ/λ)max1)0.696
Refinement
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)], wR(F2), S 0.066, 0.143, 0.92
No. of reflections5120
No. of parameters210
No. of restraints1
H-atom treatmentH-atom parameters constrained
Δρmax, Δρmin (e Å3)1.10, 1.36
Absolute structureFlack & Bernardinelli (1999), with 2877 Friedel pairs
Absolute structure parameter0.00 (2)

Computer programs: CrysAlis PRO (Agilent Technologies, 2010), SIR97 (Altomare et al., 1999), CRYSTALS (Betteridge et al., 2003), CAMERON (Watkin et al., 1996).

Hydrogen-bond geometry (Å, º) top
D—H···AD—HH···AD···AD—H···A
N15—H153···Cl5i0.892.693.417 (5)138.32
N15—H153···Cl2ii0.892.783.445 (5)132.06
N15—H152···Cl20.892.693.262 (5)122.26
N15—H152···Cl50.892.773.552 (5)146.38
N15—H151···Cl3i0.892.403.242 (5)155.22
N6—H61···Cl4iii0.882.573.274 (6)136.34
N6—H62···Cl2iii0.892.503.315 (6)151.07
N6—H63···Cl4iv0.892.303.171 (5)163.35
C7—H72···Cl3iv0.962.813.459 (7)124.62
C7—H71···Cl5v0.972.923.711 (6)138.77
C16—H161···Cl4vi0.972.883.824 (8)161.87
C16—H162···Cl3ii0.972.823.636 (8)142.03
Symmetry codes: (i) x, y+1, z+1/2; (ii) x, y+1, z1/2; (iii) x+1/2, y+3/2, z; (iv) x1/2, y+1/2, z+1/2; (v) x+1/2, y+3/2, z+1; (vi) x+1, y, z.
Calculated and experimental carbon-13 chemical shifts in (C8H11N)2[ZnCl4] top
AtomsNo optimizationOptimization of all atomsOptimization of protonsExperimental
C121.623.123.421.85
C728.256.145.245.23
C11143.4147.2142.2139.1
C13120129.1125.3129.38
C14118.3124.2123.7129.38
C8114.1116.1113.9128.32
C9113.2124.2119.7128.32
C10121.7129.1126.6129.38
C230.923.123.021.41
C1628.156.144.144.72
C20143147.2141.2138.3
C21121.4129.1126.2129.38
C22108.9124.2112.9128.32
C17112.3116.1112.3128.32
C18114.1124.2121.9129.38
C19120.8129.1126.1129.38
 

Acknowledgements

The authors acknowledge the support provided by the Secretary of State for Scientific Research and Technology of Tunisia.

References

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