supplementary materials


dn2425 scheme

Acta Cryst. (2009). E65, o460    [ doi:10.1107/S1600536809003171 ]

Creatinium perchlorate

A. Messai, A. Direm, N. Benali-Cherif, D. Luneau and E. Jeanneau

Abstract top

The title compound, C4H8N3O+·ClO4-, is built up from creatininium cations and perchlorate anions. Crystal cohesion and perchlorate stability are ensured by N-H...O hydrogen bonds that together with weak C-H...O interactions build up a three-dimensional network.

Comment top

Studies of organic-inorganic hybrid materials, including amino acids and various inorganic acids (Benali-Cherif et al., 2004), have received a great deal of attention in recent years, because of their electrical, magnetic and optical properties (Kagan et al., 1999; Hill, 1998).

Creatinine is formed by the metabolism of phosphocreatine, a high-energy molecule which provides a rapid supply of ATP to muscles. Phosphocreatine is converted spontaneously to creatinine on a regular basis. Consequently, creatinine is released into the blood and excreted by the kidneys as a metabolic waste product.

The present structure analysis of creatininium perchlorate, (I), was undertaken as part of a more general investigation into the nature of hydrogen bonding between organic bases or amino acids and inorganic acids in their crystalline forms (Cherouana et al., 2003).

In the present study, only the imino group of the imidazolyl moiety (atom N1) in creatinine is protonated, which confirms the possibility of the existence of creatininium cations in various tautomeric forms in aqueous solution. This is discussed and quantified in the light of the interpretation of the solution acidity effect on 1H, 13 C and 14 N NMR chemical shifts (Kotsyubynskyy et al., 2004).

The asymmetric unit of (I) contains a monoprotonated creatininium cation and two perchlorate anions (Fig.1).

The bond distances in the imidazolyl ring of (I) are, in general, not significantly different from those found in similar hybrid compounds containing protonated imidazolyl moieties like creatininium nitrate (Berrah et al., 2005). The creatininium ring is planar, as expected, with a mean deviation from planarity of 0.0017 Å.

The average Cl—O bond distances and O—Cl—O bond angles are 1.40625 (4) Å and 109.50 (3)°, respectively, confirming a tetrahedral configuration, similar to other perchlorates studied at low temperature. Perchlorate anions (ClO4-), surrounded by two creatininium residues via hydrogen bonds play an important role in stabilizing the crystal structure.

The cation-anion N—H—O interactions form sheet parallel to the (0 1 0) plane (Table 1, Fig.2). Weak C-H···O interactions further link the sheets to form a three dimensionnal network (Table 1).

Related literature top

For background on organic–inorganic hybrid materials, see: Benali-Cherif et al. (2004); Hill (1998); Kagan et al. (1999). For a related structure, see: Cherouana et al. (2003); Berrah et al. (2005). For interpretation of the solution acidity effect on NMR chemical shifts, see: Kotsyubynskyy et al. (2004).

Experimental top

The title compound (I) was cristallized by slow evaporation at room temperature of an aqueous solution of creatinine and perchloric acid in a 1:1 stochiometric ratio.

Refinement top

The title compound crystallizes in the centrosymmetric space group P21/n. All non-H atoms were refined with anisotropic atomic displacement parameters. All H-atoms of the cation entities were located in difference Fourier syntheses and refined as riding model with C—H and N—H bond lengths constrained to 0.96–0.97 Å and 0.834 Å, respectively.

Computing details top

Data collection: COLLECT (Nonius, 1998); cell refinement: SCALEPACK (Otwinowski & Minor, 1997); data reduction: SCALEPACK and DENZO (Otwinowski & Minor, 1997); program(s) used to solve structure: SIR92 (Altomare et al., 1993); program(s) used to refine structure: SHELXL97 (Sheldrick, 2008); molecular graphics: ORTEP-3 for Windows (Farrugia, 1997) and PLATON (Spek, 2003); software used to prepare material for publication: WinGX (Farrugia, 1999).

Figures top
[Figure 1] Fig. 1. Asymmetric unit and atom-numbering scheme of creatininium perchlorate. Displacement ellipsoids are drawn at the 30% probability level. H atoms are represented as small sphere of arbitrary radii. H bonds are shown as dashed lines.
[Figure 2] Fig. 2. Partial packing view showing the hydrogen bond pattern between cation and anion. H atoms not involved in hydrogen bonding have been omitted for clarity. [Symmetry codes: (i) x, y, z+1; (ii) 2-x, 1-y, 1-z]
creatininium perchlorate top
Crystal data top
C4H8N3O+·ClO4F(000) = 440
Mr = 213.58Dx = 1.689 Mg m3
Monoclinic, P21/nMo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
Hall symbol: -P 2ynCell parameters from 4863 reflections
a = 5.8023 (3) Åθ = 2.0–26.0°
b = 20.7782 (13) ŵ = 0.45 mm1
c = 7.3250 (4) ÅT = 293 K
β = 107.947 (4)°Prism, colourless
V = 840.14 (8) Å30.10 × 0.10 × 0.10 mm
Z = 4
Data collection top
Nonius KappaCCD
diffractometer
1209 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Radiation source: fine-focus sealed tubeRint = 0.126
graphiteθmax = 26.0°, θmin = 2.0°
ωθ scansh = 76
4080 measured reflectionsk = 2325
1587 independent reflectionsl = 99
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methods
Least-squares matrix: fullSecondary atom site location: difference Fourier map
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.075Hydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
wR(F2) = 0.230H-atom parameters constrained
S = 1.05 w = 1/[σ2(Fo2) + (0.139P)2 + 0.288P]
where P = (Fo2 + 2Fc2)/3
1586 reflections(Δ/σ)max = 0.003
119 parametersΔρmax = 0.39 e Å3
0 restraintsΔρmin = 0.41 e Å3
Crystal data top
C4H8N3O+·ClO4V = 840.14 (8) Å3
Mr = 213.58Z = 4
Monoclinic, P21/nMo Kα radiation
a = 5.8023 (3) ŵ = 0.45 mm1
b = 20.7782 (13) ÅT = 293 K
c = 7.3250 (4) Å0.10 × 0.10 × 0.10 mm
β = 107.947 (4)°
Data collection top
Nonius KappaCCD
diffractometer
1209 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
4080 measured reflectionsRint = 0.126
1587 independent reflectionsθmax = 26.0°
Refinement top
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.075H-atom parameters constrained
wR(F2) = 0.230Δρmax = 0.39 e Å3
S = 1.05Δρmin = 0.41 e Å3
1586 reflectionsAbsolute structure: ?
119 parametersFlack parameter: ?
0 restraintsRogers parameter: ?
Special details top

Geometry. All e.s.d.'s (except the e.s.d. in the dihedral angle between two l.s. planes) are estimated using the full covariance matrix. The cell e.s.d.'s are taken into account individually in the estimation of e.s.d.'s in distances, angles and torsion angles; correlations between e.s.d.'s in cell parameters are only used when they are defined by crystal symmetry. An approximate (isotropic) treatment of cell e.s.d.'s is used for estimating e.s.d.'s involving l.s. planes.

Refinement. Refinement of F2 against ALL reflections. The weighted R-factor wR and goodness of fit S are based on F2, conventional R-factors R are based on F, with F set to zero for negative F2. The threshold expression of F2 > σ(F2) is used only for calculating R-factors(gt) etc. and is not relevant to the choice of reflections for refinement. R-factors based on F2 are statistically about twice as large as those based on F, and R- factors based on ALL data will be even larger.

Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
O50.3264 (6)0.74385 (13)0.3068 (5)0.0803 (9)
N10.4969 (5)0.65462 (13)0.4848 (5)0.0623 (8)
H10.58990.64210.42020.075*
N20.5866 (6)0.57013 (14)0.7078 (6)0.0723 (10)
H2A0.56670.55220.80770.087*
H2B0.68000.55260.65080.087*
N30.3285 (5)0.65583 (13)0.7149 (4)0.0577 (8)
C20.4753 (6)0.62392 (16)0.6428 (5)0.0555 (8)
C30.2475 (8)0.6361 (2)0.8757 (6)0.0729 (11)
H3A0.26900.59050.89420.109*
H3B0.07930.64660.84910.109*
H3C0.34090.65810.98970.109*
C40.2340 (7)0.71236 (15)0.5973 (6)0.0622 (10)
H4A0.27970.75160.67130.075*
H4B0.05880.71060.54510.075*
C50.3498 (7)0.70880 (15)0.4411 (6)0.0628 (10)
Cl10.89960 (16)0.57125 (4)0.24596 (14)0.0599 (5)
O10.8635 (8)0.63394 (16)0.1663 (8)0.1392 (18)
O20.7200 (7)0.52990 (16)0.1320 (6)0.1017 (12)
O31.1298 (6)0.5496 (2)0.2543 (6)0.1112 (13)
O40.8863 (10)0.5762 (3)0.4326 (7)0.1394 (19)
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
O50.105 (2)0.0604 (16)0.085 (2)0.0036 (14)0.0420 (17)0.0152 (14)
N10.0699 (17)0.0527 (16)0.075 (2)0.0020 (13)0.0384 (16)0.0039 (14)
N20.082 (2)0.0549 (19)0.088 (2)0.0147 (14)0.0381 (19)0.0059 (15)
N30.0663 (16)0.0474 (15)0.0692 (19)0.0027 (13)0.0353 (14)0.0031 (13)
C20.0587 (18)0.0449 (16)0.066 (2)0.0009 (14)0.0244 (16)0.0049 (15)
C30.087 (3)0.064 (2)0.079 (3)0.008 (2)0.042 (2)0.0080 (19)
C40.074 (2)0.0415 (17)0.081 (3)0.0048 (15)0.0369 (19)0.0024 (15)
C50.072 (2)0.0421 (17)0.081 (3)0.0083 (15)0.0334 (19)0.0017 (16)
Cl10.0651 (7)0.0471 (6)0.0728 (7)0.0028 (3)0.0289 (5)0.0067 (3)
O10.144 (3)0.0463 (18)0.198 (5)0.0036 (19)0.010 (3)0.017 (2)
O20.110 (2)0.074 (2)0.108 (3)0.0300 (17)0.014 (2)0.0009 (17)
O30.088 (2)0.104 (3)0.155 (4)0.015 (2)0.058 (2)0.016 (3)
O40.164 (4)0.187 (5)0.091 (3)0.029 (3)0.074 (3)0.019 (3)
Geometric parameters (Å, °) top
O5—C51.197 (5)C3—H3A0.9600
N1—C21.361 (4)C3—H3B0.9600
N1—C51.389 (5)C3—H3C0.9600
N1—H10.8600C4—C51.497 (6)
N2—C21.305 (4)C4—H4A0.9700
N2—H2A0.8600C4—H4B0.9700
N2—H2B0.8600Cl1—O31.393 (3)
N3—C21.312 (4)Cl1—O41.396 (4)
N3—C31.455 (5)Cl1—O21.409 (3)
N3—C41.460 (4)Cl1—O11.416 (4)
C2—N1—C5111.4 (3)H3B—C3—H3C109.5
C2—N1—H1124.3N3—C4—C5103.6 (3)
C5—N1—H1124.3N3—C4—H4A111.0
C2—N2—H2A120.0C5—C4—H4A111.0
C2—N2—H2B120.0N3—C4—H4B111.0
H2A—N2—H2B120.0C5—C4—H4B111.0
C2—N3—C3126.5 (3)H4A—C4—H4B109.0
C2—N3—C4110.0 (3)O5—C5—N1126.0 (4)
C3—N3—C4123.3 (3)O5—C5—C4129.3 (3)
N2—C2—N3126.6 (4)N1—C5—C4104.6 (3)
N2—C2—N1123.1 (3)O3—Cl1—O4108.8 (3)
N3—C2—N1110.3 (3)O3—Cl1—O2110.7 (3)
N3—C3—H3A109.5O4—Cl1—O2111.8 (3)
N3—C3—H3B109.5O3—Cl1—O1109.5 (3)
H3A—C3—H3B109.5O4—Cl1—O1106.8 (3)
N3—C3—H3C109.5O2—Cl1—O1109.2 (2)
H3A—C3—H3C109.5
Hydrogen-bond geometry (Å, °) top
D—H···AD—HH···AD···AD—H···A
N1—H1···O40.862.182.905 (5)142
N2—H2B···O40.862.333.044 (6)141
N2—H2A···O2i0.862.313.077 (6)148
N2—H2A···O2ii0.862.523.186 (5)136
N2—H2B···O3iii0.862.392.947 (5)123
C3—H3A···O2ii0.962.513.455 (5)168
C4—H4A···O1iv0.972.433.284 (5)147
Symmetry codes: (i) x, y, z+1; (ii) −x+1, −y+1, −z+1; (iii) −x+2, −y+1, −z+1; (iv) x−1/2, −y+3/2, z+1/2.
Table 1
Hydrogen-bond geometry (Å, °)
top
D—H···AD—HH···AD···AD—H···A
N1—H1···O40.862.182.905 (5)142
N2—H2B···O40.862.333.044 (6)141
N2—H2A···O2i0.862.313.077 (6)148
N2—H2A···O2ii0.862.523.186 (5)136
N2—H2B···O3iii0.862.392.947 (5)123
C3—H3A···O2ii0.962.513.455 (5)168
C4—H4A···O1iv0.972.433.284 (5)147
Symmetry codes: (i) x, y, z+1; (ii) −x+1, −y+1, −z+1; (iii) −x+2, −y+1, −z+1; (iv) x−1/2, −y+3/2, z+1/2.
Acknowledgements top

We wish to thank the Centre Universitaire de Khenchela for financial support.

references
References top

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