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IUCrJ
Volume 2| Part 5| September 2015| Pages 523-533
ISSN: 2052-2525

Exploration and exploitation of homologous series of bis­(acrylamido)alkanes containing pyridyl and phenyl groups: β-sheet versus two-dimensional layers in solid-state photochemical [2 + 2] reactions

aDepartment of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302, India
*Correspondence e-mail: kbiradha@yahoo.com

Edited by C.-Y. Su, Sun Yat-Sen University, China (Received 25 March 2015; accepted 22 May 2015; online 31 July 2015)

The homologous series of phenyl and pyridyl substituted bis(acrylamido)alkanes have been synthesized with the aim of systematic analysis of their crystal structures and their solid-state [2 + 2] reactivities. The changes in the crystal structures with respect to a small change in the molecular structure, that is by varying alkyl spacers between acrylamides and/or by varying the end groups (phenyl, 2-pyridyl, 3-pyridyl, 4-pyridyl) on the C-terminal of the amide, were analyzed in terms of hydrogen-bonding interference (N—H⋯Npy versus N—H⋯O=C) and network geometries. In this series, a greater tendency towards the formation of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds (β-sheets and two-dimensional networks) over N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds was observed. Among all the structures seven structures were found to have the required alignments of double bonds for the [2 + 2] reaction such that the formations of single dimer, double dimer and polymer are facilitated. However, only four structures were found to exhibit such a solid-state [2 + 2] reaction to form a single dimer and polymers. The two-dimensional hydrogen-bonding layer via N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds was found to promote solid-state [2 + 2] photo-polymerization in a single-crystal-to-single-crystal manner. Such two-dimensional layers were encountered only when the spacer between acryl amide moieties is butyl. Only four out of the 16 derivatives were found to form hydrates, two each from 2-pyridyl and 4-pyridyl derivatives. The water molecules in these structures govern the hydrogen-bonding networks by the formation of an octameric water cluster and one-dimensional zigzag water chains. The trends in the melting points and densities were also analyzed.

1. Introduction

The systematic exploration of solid-state ensembles of organic molecules containing functional groups which possess similar interactive capabilities albeit minor variations laid the foundation for the gigantic rise of the field of crystal engineering (Schmidt, 1971[Schmidt, G. M. J. (1971). Pure Appl. Chem. 27, 647-678.]; Desiraju, 1989[Desiraju, G. R. (1989). Crystal Engineering: The Design of Organic Solids. Amsterdam: Elsevier.]; Lehn, 1995[Lehn, J. M. (1995). Supramolecular Chemistry: Concepts and Perspectives. Weinheim: VCH.]; Whitesides et al., 1995[Whitesides, G. M., Simanek, E. E., Mathias, J. P., Seto, C. T., Chin, D. N., Mammen, M. & Gordon, D. M. (1995). Acc. Chem. Res. 28, 37-44.]; Aakeröy et al., 2001[Aakeröy, C. B., Beatty, A. M. & Helfrich, B. A. (2001). Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 40, 3240-3242.]; Moulton & Zaworotko, 2001[Moulton, B. & Zaworotko, M. J. (2001). Chem. Rev. 101, 1629-1658.]; Zaworotko, 2001[Zaworotko, M. J. (2001). Chem. Commun. pp. 1-9.]; Desiraju, 2002[Desiraju, G. R. (2002). Acc. Chem. Res. 35, 565-573.]; Biradha, 2003[Biradha, K. (2003). CrystEngComm, 5, 374-384.]; Vangala et al., 2005[Vangala, V. R., Mondal, R., Broder, C. K., Howard, J. A. K. & Desiraju, G. R. (2005). Cryst. Growth Des. 5, 99-104.]; Rajput et al., 2007[Rajput, L., Sanphui, P. & Biradha, K. (2007a). Cryst. Growth Des. 7, 1872-1880.]a[Rajput, L., Sanphui, P. & Biradha, K. (2007a). Cryst. Growth Des. 7, 1872-1880.]; Mukherjee & Biradha, 2011b[Mukherjee, G. & Biradha, K. (2011a). Cryst. Growth Des. 11, 924-929.]). The comparison between various halogen derivatives, either by changing the halogen atoms or by changing their position on the aromatic ring is one of the finest examples of such systematic explorations (Bent, 1968[Bent, H. A. (1968). Chem. Rev. 68, 587-648.]; Legon, 1999[Legon, A. C. (1999). Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 38, 2686-2714.]; Metrangolo & Resnati, 2001[Metrangolo, P. & Resnati, G. (2001). Chem. Eur. J. 7, 2511-2519.]; Metrangolo et al., 2005[Metrangolo, P., Neukirch, H., Pilati, T. & Resnati, G. (2005). Acc. Chem. Res. 38, 386-395.], 2008[Metrangolo, P., Meyer, F., Pilati, T., Resnati, G. & Terraneo, G. (2008). Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 47, 6114-6127.]; Marras et al., 2006[Marras, G., Metrangolo, P., Meyer, F., Pilati, T., Resnti, G. & Vij, A. (2006). New. J. Chem. 30, 1397-1402.]; Shirman et al., 2008[Shirman, T., Lamere, J.-F., Shimon, L. J. W., Gupta, T., Martin, J. M. L. & van der Boom, M. E. (2008). Cryst. Growth Des. 8, 3066-3072.]; Samai & Biradha, 2009[Samai, S. & Biradha, K. (2009). CrystEngComm, 11, 482-492.]). On the other hand, the similarities or anomalies in the properties of homologues series of n-alkanes and α,ω-substituted dithiols, diols, diamines and diacids are well understood from their crystal structures (Hicks & Nodwell, 2000[Hicks, R. & Nodwell, M. B. (2000). J. Am. Chem. Soc. 122, 6746-6753.]; Xu et al., 2002[Xu, J., He, C., Toh, K. C. & Lu, X. (2002). Macromolecules, 35, 8846-8851.]; Vishweshwar et al., 2003[Vishweshwar, P., Nangia, A. & Lynch, V. M. (2003). Cryst. Growth Des. 3, 783-790.]; Gibson et al., 2003[Gibson, H. W., Yamaguchi, N. & Jones, J. W. (2003). J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125, 3522-3533.]; Lee et al., 2007[Lee, S. J., Lee, S. S., Lee, C. G. & Jung, J. H. (2007). Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 28, 867-870.]). Apart from these very few homologous series, in particular molecules containing more than one functional group that are capable of hydrogen bonding, are characterized crystallographically. The increase in functional groups and flexibility increases the complexity and decreases the probability of having isostructurality in the series. Further, the isostructurality of homologous series is not an obvious fact as the process of crystallization depends on several factors such as aggregation, size and solvation apart from the structure of a molecule.

In these lines we have previously reported our studies on homologous series of N,N′-bis(pyridinecarboxamido)alkanes (amides) (Sarkar & Biradha, 2006[Sarkar, M. & Biradha, K. (2006). Cryst. Growth Des. 6, 202-208.]) and N,N′-bis(pyridyl)alkanediamides (reverse amides) (Rajput et al., 2007[Rajput, L., Sanphui, P. & Biradha, K. (2007a). Cryst. Growth Des. 7, 1872-1880.][Rajput, L., Singha, S. & Biradha, K. (2007b). Cryst. Growth Des. 7, 2788-2795.]b[Rajput, L., Singha, S. & Biradha, K. (2007b). Cryst. Growth Des. 7, 2788-2795.]) in which amide moieties are separated by alkyl (—(CH2)n—) spacers (Fig. 1[link]). From these studies it was evident that both series exhibit an odd–even effect on the nature of the hydrogen bond and their network features (Mukherjee & Biradha, 2011a[Mukherjee, G. & Biradha, K. (2011b). Cryst. Growth Des. 11, 5649-5658.]). As these classes of compounds contain two each of amide and pyridine moieties, the molecules were assembled through either N—H⋯O or N—H⋯N or both the interactions. The β-sheets or (4,4)-networks, via N—H⋯O or N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds, are the two most common motifs displayed by the derivatives containing an even number of —CH2— groups. The amide molecules were found to assemble mostly via amide-to-amide recognitions in amides, while pyridine interferences to the amide-to-amide hydrogen bond was found to be more prominent in the case of the reverse amide series, i.e. the N—H⋯N interaction is preferred over the N—H⋯O hydrogen bond. In contrast to the formation of the β-sheets or (4,4)-networks by the even ones, the formation of three-dimensional structures were found to be more frequent in the case of odd ones.

[Figure 1]
Figure 1
Amides and reverse amides

From these studies it was understood that the hydrogen bonded (4,4)-networks can promote solid-state [2 + 2] reactions (Garai et al., 2013[Garai, M., Santra, R. & Biradha, K. (2013). Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 52, 5548-5551.]) to form polymers containing cyclobutanes and amides in the chain with the phenyl/pyridyl groups as dangling attachments, provided the bis-amide molecules contain double bonds at the terminals. In order to test this hypothesis several derivatives of 14 were prepared by changing the spacers between the amide functionalities (Fig. 2[link]). The crystal structures were analyzed in comparison with those of homologues series of amides and reverse amides. Further, the solid-state [2 + 2] reactions were explored wherever possible. It was shown by us earlier that the crystal structures of molecules 1c and 3c containing the butane spacer possess such unique features to form the hydrogen bonded (4,4)-layer which promotes the polymerization reaction as anticipated in a single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC) manner to yield crystalline organic polymers (Garai et al., 2013[Garai, M., Santra, R. & Biradha, K. (2013). Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 52, 5548-5551.]). Such polymerization reactions are very rare and the only example in the literature is 2,5-distyrylpyrazine reported by Hasegawa et al. (Hasegawa, 1983[Hasegawa, M. (1983). Chem. Rev. 83, 507-518.]; Hasegawa et al., 1986[Hasegawa, M., Harashina, H., Kato, S. & Saigo, K. (1986). Macromolecules, 19, 1276-1278.]). In this manuscript the following points will be addressed by analyzing homologous series of crystal structures of 14: (1) competition between the O atom of the amide and the N atom of pyridine to form hydrogen bonds with the amide N—H group; (2) similarities or differences with previously published bis-amide analogues; (3) formation of the two-dimensional layer versus the β-sheet hydrogen-bond networks (Fig. 3[link]); (4) propensity for the formation of hydrates; (5) trends in their melting points; (6) alignment of double bonds for solid-state [2 + 2] reactions; (7) exploration of their reactivities and characterization of their products wherever possible.

[Figure 2]
Figure 2
1: R = phenyl; 2: R = 2-pyridyl; 3: R = 3-pyridyl; 4: R = 4-pyridyl, a: X = —HN—NH—, b: X = —HN—(CH2)2—NH, c: X = —HN—(CH2)4—NH—; d: X = —HN—(CH2)6—NH—.
[Figure 3]
Figure 3
Representation of (a) β-sheet and (b) two-dimensional layers.

2. Experimental

FTIR spectra were recorded with a Perkin–Elmer Instrument Spectrum Rx Serial No. 73713. Powder XRD patterns were recorded with a Bruker AXS-D8-ADVANCE diffractometer (Cu target). 1H NMR (200/600 MHz) spectra were recorded on a Bruker AC 200/600 MHz spectrometer. The MALDI-TOF experiment was carried out using a Bruker ultrafleXtreme MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometer.

2.1. Synthesis of 1a

In a round-bottom flask cinnamic acid (1.21 g, 0.0081 mol) and pyridine (15 ml) were taken and hydrazine hydrate (0.194 ml, 0.004 mol) was added to the reaction mixture and stirred for ∼ 15–20 min. After that triphenyl phosphite (2.25 ml, 0.0086 mol) was added to it and the reaction mixture was refluxed for 7–8 h.

After cooling to room temperature, the pyridine was distilled out to reduce the volume up to 5 ml. For the work up process, EtOH was added and then the solid product was filtered and washed with EtOH. The white solid product was recrystallized from methanol–DMF.

1a. Yield: 78%; m.p.: 280°C. Anal.: calc. for C18H16N2O2: C 74.0, H 5.5, N 9.6; found: C 69.49, H 4.79, N 8.59%.

Compounds 1b1d, 2a2d and 3a3d were prepared by following the above procedure, but by using corresponding diamine and cinnamic acid, (E)-3-(pyridin-2-yl)-acrylic acid and (E)-3-(pyridin-3-yl)-acrylic acid, respectively.

1b. Yield: 84%; m.p.: 250°C. Anal.: calc. for C20H18N2O2: C 75.4, H 5.7, N 8.8; found: C 64.67, H 4.76, N 7.68%.

1c. Yield: 72%; m.p.: 268°C. Anal.: calc. for C22H24N2O2: C 75.83, H 6.94, N 8.04; found: C 75.20, H 6.72, N 7.84%.

2a. Yield: 56%; m.p.: 248°C. Anal.: calc. for C16H14N4O2: C 68.6, H 7.5, N 20.0; found: C 68.2, H 6.82, N 19.8%.

2b. Yield: 42%; m.p.: 210°C. Anal.: calc. for C18H18N4O6: C 56.0, H 4.7, N 14.5; found: C 55.2, H 4.52, N 13.8%.

2d. Yield: 60%; m.p.: 182°C. Anal.: calc. for C22H26N4O4: C 64.4, H 6.4, N 13.7; found: C 63.9, H 5.82, N 12.8%.

3a. Yield: 57.2%; m.p. 272°C. Anal.: calc. for C16H14N4O2: C 65.68, H 4.42, N 18.76; found: C 65.30, H 4.79, N 19.04%.

3b. Yield: 78%; m.p.: 235°C. Anal.: calc. for C18H18N4O2: C 67.1, H 5.6, N 17.4; found: C 66.43, H 5.62, N 16.52%.

3c. Yield: 60%; m.p.: 249°C. Anal.: calc. for C20H22N4O2: C 68.55, H 6.33, N 15.99; found: C 67.74, H 6.63, N 14.96%.

2.2. Synthesis of 4a

In a round-bottom flask (E)-3-(pyridine-4-yl) acrylic acid (0.596 g, 0.000399 mol), pentafluorophenol (0.8 g, 0.00434 mol) and DCC (0.908 g, 0.0044 mol) were taken in 20 ml of dry THF solvent and stirred over 24 h at room temperature, then the solvent was distilled out to collect the solid product. The solid product was recrystallized from pet-ether. The recrystallized ester (1 g, 0.00313 mol) and hydrazine hydrate (0.077 ml, 0.00109 mol) were taken in dry DMF solvent and stirred at room temperature for 24 h. Then the solid product was filtered and recrystallized with MeOH. Yield: 62.8%; m.p. 279°C. Anal.: calc. for C16H14N4O2: C 65.30, H 4.79, N 19.04; found: C 64.94, H 4.53, N 18.76%.

Similar procedures were followed for the synthesis of 4b4d by using the corresponding diamines and pentafluoroester of (E)-3-(pyridine-4-yl) acrylic acid. In these cases, dry THF was used as the solvent.

4b. Yield: 58%; m.p.: 275°C. Anal.: calc. for C18H18N4O2: C 67.1, H 5.6, N 17.4; found: C 66.9, H 5.49, N 16.69%.

4c. Yield: 66%; m.p.: 235–238°C. Anal.: calc. for C20H26N4O4: C 62.2, H 6.8, N 14.5; found: C 61.49, H 5.59, N 14.19%.

4d. Yield: 58%; m.p.: 175°C. Anal.: calc. for C22H30N4O4: C 63.7, H 7.3, N 13.5; found: C 62.79, H 6.49, N 12.46%.

2.3. Crystallographic data and refinement details

All the single-crystal data were collected on a Bruker APEX-II CCD X-ray diffractometer that uses graphite monochromated Mo Kα radiation (λ = 0.71073 Å) at room temperature (293 K) by the hemisphere method. The structures were solved by direct methods and refined by least-squares methods on F2 using SHELX97 (Sheldrick, 2015[Sheldrick, G. M. (2015). Acta Cryst. C71, 3-8.]). Non-hydrogen atoms were refined anisotropically and hydrogen atoms were fixed at calculated positions and refined using a riding model.

3. Results and discussion

The compounds 1a1d, 2a2d and 3a3d are synthesized by refluxing the corresponding diamines with cinnamic acid, (E)-3-(pyridin-2-yl)-acrylic acid and (E)-3-(pyridin-3-yl)-acrylic acid, respectively, in the presence of triphenyl phosphate in pyridine. The same procedure was found to be incompatible for the syntheses of derivatives of 4. Therefore, compounds 4a4d are synthesized by reacting the pentafluoroester of (E)-3-(pyridin-4-yl)-acrylic acid with corresponding diamines. Single crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained by the slow evaporation technique from methanol, ethanol or methanol–DMF, methanol–THF solutions of the corresponding compounds. Despite several trails the single crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction analyses could not be obtained for 2c and 3d. The comparison of X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) patterns with the related analogues hinted at their probable crystal structures. The crystal structures of all the derivatives have been analyzed in terms of hydrogen-bonding networks and comparisons were made with respect to the related derivatives of amides and reverse amides. Further, these studies revealed that the series of these 16 structures can be categorized as four types: (1) β-sheet via N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds; (2) β-sheet via N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds; (3) two-dimensional layer via N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds; (4) two-dimensional layer via N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds. In the following sections the results will be described based on the spacers as listed in Fig. 2[link]. The photochemical [2 + 2] reactions were carried out on 1c, 2b, 2c, 3a, 3c, 4a and 4c as the structures indicated the possibility of such reactions. The pertinent crystallographic details are given in Table 1[link] and the hydrogen-bonding parameters are given in Table 2[link].

Table 1
Crystallographic data and structure refinement parameters for compounds

  1a 1b 1d 2a 2b 2d
Chemical formula C18H16N2O2 C20H20N2O2 C24H28N2O2 C16 H14N4O2 C18H18N4O6 C22H26N4O4
Mr 292.33 320.38 376.48 294.31 394.43 414.50
T (K) 293 293 293 100 293 293
Crystal system Monoclinic Monoclinic Monoclinic Monoclinic Monoclinic Monoclinic
Space group C2/c P21/c P21/c P21/n P21/c P21/c
a (Å) 18.451 (9) 17.899 (3) 20.243 (5) 4.7315 (10) 9.3530 (6) 7.6364 (14)
b (Å) 10.540 (5) 4.8544 (9) 4.9756 (14) 9.213 (2) 10.9015 (7) 30.058 (5)
c (Å) 8.157 (4) 9.5259 (16) 20.839 (6) 16.390 (4) 19.9985 (14) 4.8885 (9)
α (°) 90.00 90.00 90.00 90.00 90.00 90.00
β (°) 98.824 (12) 101.847 (4) 99.148 (8) 97.020 (6) 94.547 (2) 95.523 (6)
γ (°) 90.00 90.00 90.00 90.00 90.00 90.00
V3) 1567.6 (13) 810.1 (2) 2072.2 (10) 709.1 (3) 2032.7 (2) 1116.9 (3)
Z 4 2 4 2 4 2
Dx (mg m−3) 1.239 1.313 1.207 1.378 1.289 1.233
R1 [I > 2(σI))] 0.0549 0.00373 0.0785 0.0401 0.0638 0.0714
wR2 (on F2, all data) 0.1930 0.1071 0.2013 0.1319 0.2030 0.1999
  3a 3b 4b 4c 4d
Chemical formula C16H14N4O2 C18H18N4O2 C18H18N4O2 C20H26N4O4 C22H30N4O4
Mr 294.31 322.36 322.36 386.45 414.50
T (K) 293 293 293 100 293
Crystal system Monoclinic Monoclinic Monoclinic Monoclinic Monoclinic
Space group P21/c C2/c P21/n P21/c P21/n
a (Å) 10.403 (6) 34.566 (5) 4.7967 (15) 12.78 (2) 7.3720 (7)
b (Å) 7.160 (4) 9.3338 (13) 11.547 (4) 4.681 (9) 4.9035 (4)
c (Å) 19.202 (11) 10.4191 (15) 14.726 (5) 16.21 (3) 31.586 (3)
α (°) 90.00 90.00 90.00 90.00 90.00
β (°) 101.156 (17) 100.401 (4) 96.451 (10) 93.42 (3) 90.197 (3)
γ (°) 90.00 90.00 90.00 90.00 90.00
V3) 1403.1 (14) 3306.3 (8) 810.5 (4) 968 (3) 1141.78 (18)
Z 4 8 2 2 2
Dx (mg m−3) 1.393 1.295 1.321 1.326 1.206
R1 [I > 2(σI)] 0.0430 0.0599 0.0646 0.0853 0.0599
wR2 (on F2, all data) 0.0801 0.2079 0.1403 0.2241 0.2079

Table 2
Geometrical parameters (Å, °) of hydrogen bonds

  Type H⋯A (Å) DA (Å) D—H⋯A (°)
1a N—H⋯O 1.97 2.823 (3) 173
C—H⋯O 2.51 2.843 (3) 101
1b N—H⋯O 2.04 2.889 (2) 171
1d N—H⋯O 2.13 2.974 (4) 166
N—H⋯O 2.09 2.939 (4) 170
C—H⋯O 2.53 2.858 (5) 101
2a N—H⋯O 2.06 2.817 147
C—H⋯N 2.58 3.442 (6) 155
C—H⋯O 2.58 3.400 (3) 148
C—H⋯O 2.54 2.847 (5) 100
2b N—H⋯O 2.20 3.056 (3) 174
N—H⋯O 2.23 3.037 (3) 156
C—H⋯O 2.47 2.809 (3) 101
C—H⋯O 2.49 3.381 (3) 160
C—H⋯O 2.56 2.875 (3) 100
C—H⋯O 2.43 2.767 (3) 100
2d N—H⋯O 2.11 2.943 (4) 162
C—H⋯O 2.60 3.443 (6) 152
C—H⋯O 2.51 2.838 (5) 101
3a N—H⋯O 2.20 3.032 (3) 163
N—H⋯O 2.32 3.165 (3) 169
C—H⋯O 2.46 3.144 (3) 131
C—H⋯O 2.50 2.839 (3) 101
C—H⋯O 2.55 3.222 (3) 130
C—H⋯O 2.50 3.198 (3) 132
C—H⋯O 2.50 2.841 (3) 102
3b N—H⋯O 2.06 2.910 (3) 167
N—H⋯O 1.97 2.809 (3) 166
C—H⋯O 2.49 2.828 (3) 101
C—H⋯O 2.52 2.848(3) 101
4b N—H⋯N 2.15 2.980 (5) 161
C—H⋯O 2.48 3.219 (6) 137
C—H⋯O 2.54 2.861 (5) 100
C—H⋯O 2.45 2.825 (5) 103
4c O—H⋯O 1.83 (5) 2.763 (7) 153 (3)
O—H⋯N 2.06 (4) 2.805 (7) 169 (5)
N—H⋯O 1.97 2.803 (7) 164
C—H⋯O 2.42 3.112 (8) 131
C—H⋯O 2.52 3.463 (8) 165
C—H⋯O 2.45 2.822 (7) 103
4d N—H⋯O 2.07 2.921 (2) 168
O—H⋯N 2.02 (3) 2.891 (4) 169.3 (19)
C—H⋯O 2.53 2.849 (3) 100

3.1. β-sheet and two-dimensional layers with the —HN—NH— spacer

Molecules 1a, 2a, 3a and 4a all crystallize in monoclinic space groups C2/c, P21/n, P21/c and P21/n, respectively. With the exception of 3a, which contains one molecule, all the other three contain half molecules in the asymmetric unit. Interestingly no solvent inclusion was found in all four lattices, making the comparison between these structures more realistic. With the exception of 1a, the hydrazine moieties (C—N—N—C: 164° in 2a and 3a and 180° in 4a) exhibited near co-planar geometry. In 1a the hydrazine moiety resembles that of a simple hydrazine or H2O2 with C—N—N—C torsion of 115°. The molecules in 1a (along the c-axis with a repeat distance of 4.07 Å) and 2a (along the a-axis with a repeat distance of 4.73 Å) assemble via N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds to form β-sheets containing ten-membered rings. Although both form β-sheets the differences in both the structures are apparent given the differences in the geometry of the spacer and molecules: non-coplanar in 1a and nearly planar in 2a. In 1a the molecules are aligned in a zigzag manner, while in 2a they are aligned in a plane containing the hydrogen bonds. In 1a the hydrogen bonds [N⋯O, N—H⋯O: 2.823 (3) Å, 173.5°] are more linear than those in 2a (N⋯O, N—H⋯O: 2.817 Å, 147.4°) (Fig. 4[link]). Given these differences the packing of β-sheets also differ significantly: in 1a the sheets have a parallel packing (C—H⋯π and ππ interactions), while in 2a they have herringbone packing (C—H⋯N, C—H⋯π and ππ interactions) (Fig. S33).

[Figure 4]
Figure 4
Illustrations for the crystal structures of 1a and 2a: packing diagrams for (a) 1a and (c) 2a; β-sheets in (b) 1a and (d) 2a. Notice the difference in alignment of molecules within the β-sheet between 1a and 2a.

In 3a and 4a the pyridyl groups are found to exhibit interference and form N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds. Although both are nearly planar molecules the hydrogen-bonding patterns and packing are found to differ drastically. In 3a the molecules assemble to form a one-dimensional chain that resembles a β-sheet but via N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds and also the molecules are off-set. These one-dimensional chains pack in a parallel fashion which is somewhat similar to that of 1a (Fig. 5[link]). Whereas in 4a, the molecules assemble to form a herringbone layer via N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds containing rectangular cavities which are filled by the adjacent layers. The layers pack such that the double bonds are aligned for double [2 + 2] reaction (Fig. 6[link]).

[Figure 5]
Figure 5
Illustrations for the crystal structure of 3a: (a) packing diagram; (b) one-dimensional chain via N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds; (c) off-set packing of 3a; (d) stacking of 3a for single [2 + 2] reaction.
[Figure 6]
Figure 6
Illustrations for the crystal structure of 4a: (a) a two-dimensional herringbone layer via N—H⋯N hydrogen; (b) packing of layers on top of each other to form infinite stacks. Note that the double bonds are aligned within the stacks to undergo double [2 + 2] reaction.

3.2. β-sheet, two-dimensional layers and water inclusion with —HN—(CH2)2—NH— spacer

The molecules 1b and 2b crystallized in space group P21/c, while 3b and 4b crystallized in space groups C2/c and P21/n, respectively. The asymmetric units of 1b and 4b are constituted by a half unit of the corresponding molecules, while that of 3b is constituted by two half units of 3b. The asymmetric unit of 2b contains one full molecule and four H2O molecules. The geometries of these molecules were found to be different, although all contain the HN—CH2—CH2—NH moiety with anti geometry (N—C—C—N: 180° in 1b, 3b and 4b and 176° in 2b). The interplanar angles between the amide planes are 0° in 1b, 3b and 4b, while it is 61° in 2b. Further, the plane of C=C—C=O creates the following angles with the central N—C—C—N plane: 19° in 1b, 80° and 19° in 2b, 77° and 12° in 3b and 72° in 4b.

In 1b and 3b, the molecules assemble via N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds to form the usual β-sheets along the b-axis. The molecules within the sheet are in-plane in 1b with a repeat distance of 4.85 Å, while they are not in-plane in 3b and contain a repeat distance of 4.65 Å. The sheets pack in a parallel fashion in the case of 1b, while the sheets exhibit some angularity in the packing in 3b (Fig. 7[link]).

[Figure 7]
Figure 7
Illustrations for the crystal structures of 1b and 3b: packing diagrams for (a) 1b and (b) 3b; β-sheets observed in (c) 1b and (d) 3b. Notice the difference in alignment of molecules within the β-sheet between 1b and 3b.

The crystal structure of 2b is drastically different from all the structures presented here as the crystal lattice contains four water molecules which govern the overall hydrogen-bonding interactions. No amide-to-amide or amide-to-pyridine hydrogen bonding was found in this structure. The water molecules form an octamer via O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. The octamer contains a flat six-membered ring with the other two water molecules linked at 1,4 positions. These octamers link the molecules of 2b into a three-dimensional network with a plethora of hydrogen-bonding interactions. In the octamer, in terms of hydrogen bonding three types of water molecules exists: (1) four water molecules involved in four hydrogen bonds each, two O—H⋯O with H2O, one N—H⋯Ow with the amide and one O—H⋯N with the pyridine N-atom; these O atoms exhibit near tetrahedral geometry in terms of hydrogen bonding; (2) two involved in exclusively three Ow—H⋯Ow hydrogen bonds each with water molecules; (3) two involved in one Ow—H⋯Ow and two Ow—H⋯O=C hydrogen bonds each. The second and third categories exhibit nearly planar geometry in terms of hydrogen bonding. In this three-dimensional network, it was found that the double bonds are aligned for a single [2 + 2] reaction (Fig. 8[link]).

[Figure 8]
Figure 8
Illustrations for the crystal structure of 2b: (a) linking of molecules of 2b into the three-dimensional network by the O—H⋯O and N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds with lattice water molecules; (b) octameric water cluster via O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds; (c) alignment of double bonds of 2b for a single [2 + 2] reaction.

The crystal structure of 4b bears a close resemblance to that of 4a as it forms a similar herringbone layer via N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds. However, here the double bonds are not aligned for the [2 + 2] reaction as the packing of the layers differ due to the presence of the —CH2—CH2— spacer. Further, this structure is found to be isostructural with that of the amide analogues with 4-pyridyl substitution and the ethyl spacer.

3.3. N—H⋯O hydrogen-bonded two-dimensional layers and β-sheet with —HN—(CH2)4—NH— spacer

In this series the single crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained for 1c, 3c and 4c. Compound 2c failed to form suitable single crystals despite several trails. The crystal structures and the solid-state reactivates of 1c and 3c were published by us earlier. Molecules 1c and 3c were found to exhibit two-dimensional layers via amide-to-amide hydrogen bonds [1c: N⋯O, N—H⋯O: 2.901 (4) Å, 161°] and contain the required double bond alignment for [2 + 2] polymerization as anticipated. In particular, within the layers the double bonds are aligned with a distance (d1) of 3.812 Å and C=C⋯C=C torsion (τ2) of 0°. The comparison of XRPD patterns of 2c with those of 1c indicates that the crystal structures of 2c could be similar to that of 1c (Fig. 9[link]). Both 1c and 3c contain half molecules in the asymmetric units. The geometries of the molecules of 1c and 3c were found to be somewhat similar to those of the above structures as the planes of C=C—C=O create almost right angles (73.6° in 1c and 74.8° in 3c) with that of the spacer —C—C—C—C— plane, and the amide planes are parallel to each other. Further, the central butyl amine moiety is found to have non-planar geometry with the N—C—C—C torsion angles of 59° and 62° in 1c and 3c, respectively.

[Figure 9]
Figure 9
XRPD patterns of (a) 1c (calculated); (b) 2c (observed); note the matching of patterns.

The crystal structure of 4c is found to be totally different from the above structures as it includes water in the crystal lattice. The crystals exhibit space group P21/c and the asymmetric unit is constituted by half a unit of 4c and one water molecule. The geometry also differs from the above structures as the central plane of the alkyl spacer makes an angle of 64° with that of C=C—C=O. Unlike the above two structures the —N—(CH2)4—N— fragment exhibits all anti geometry with N—C—C—C angles of 180°. The molecules assemble via amide-to-amide N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds to form the β-sheet network along the b axis with a repeat distance of 4.68 Å. These sheets are further connected via Ow—H⋯Npyridine hydrogen bonds to the chain of water molecules leading to the formation of a two-dimensional layer in which each water has three connectivity (Fig. 10[link]). These layers stack on each other via C—H⋯π and C—H⋯O interactions.

[Figure 10]
Figure 10
Illustrations for the crystal structure of 4c: (a) linking of β-sheets via H2O molecules to form a two-dimensional layer; (b) packing of the layers such that the double bonds are aligned for a possible [2 + 2] photopolymerization reaction.

3.4. β-sheets with —HN—(CH2)6—NH— spacer

In accordance with our previous studies the introduction of a hexyl spacer resulted in the β-sheet structures in a consistent manner. Molecules 1d and 2d crystallized in P21/c and 4d crystallized in P21/n. Single crystals of 3d could not be obtained despite several trails by varying solvents and their combinations. The asymmetric unit of 1d is constituted by one molecule while those of 2d and 4d are constituted by half a unit of the corresponding molecule and one H2O molecule. The molecular geometries are somewhat similar in all three cases as the amide planes are in-plane with the plane of hexyl spacer, which exhibits all anti geometry. In all three structures the molecules assemble in β-sheets via amide-to-amide N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, along the b-axis in 1d and 4d, and along the c-axis in 2d with the same repeat distance of 4.9 Å. In 2d and 4d, neither the water molecules nor the pyridyl groups interfere in amide-to-amide. Rather water molecules form zigzag chains via O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds and join the β-sheets in two-dimensional layers via Ow—H⋯Npyridine hydrogen bonds. Interestingly, given the positional differences of pyridines in 2d and 4d, the layers have different geometries although they have the same hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In 2d the layers are highly corrugated, while they are planar in 4d (Fig. 11[link]). In both layers water molecules exhibit 3-connectivity: two Ow—H⋯Ow with neighbouring water molecules and O—H⋯N with pyridine moieties. We note here that the crystal structure of 4d was found to be isostructural with that of 4c. The layers pack on each other with an interlayer separation of 4 Å in 2d and 4d, whereas in 1d the β-sheets pack in a parallel fashion. The XRPD of 3d was found to be similar to that of 1d, indicating it may also have similar β-sheet formation (Fig. S30).

[Figure 11]
Figure 11
Illustrations for the crystal structure of 2d: (a) packing diagram, note the linking of β-sheets into the three-dimensional network by water molecules; (b) linking of β-sheets of 2d by the zigzag chain of water molecules.

3.5. Molecular structure versus hydrogen-bonding networks

In previous studies on amides and reverse amides it was found that the geometry of the molecule and position of the pyridine groups play a key role in the competition of acceptors C=O of amide and the N atom of pyridine to form hydrogen bonds with the N—H group of amides. In particular, the inter-planar angle (θ) between the amide group and the terminal aromatic ring tailors the resultant hydrogen bonds. The θ-value of less than 20° results in the formation of N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds, while above 20° results in the formation of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. This phenomenon was also explored using a larger set of compounds from the CSD. In the present series it was found that this hypothesis holds good with the exception of three compounds, namely 1a, 1c and 3c, which form amide-to-amide hydrogen bonds despite having a θ-value below 20°, i.e. 8.45°, 12.83° and 8.42°, respectively (Table S2).

The probable reasons could be due to their unusual molecular geometries which differ totally from the rest of the structures presented here as they deviate heavily from linearity. Further, it was found earlier that the phenyl and the 3-pyridyl substituted derivatives do not form hydrates, while the 4-pyridyl derivatives do exhibit such a tendency. Similarly, out of four 4-pyridyl derivatives studied here, two form hydrates. Interestingly, the present studies show that the 2-pyridyl groups also have a similar tendency to form such hydrates as two out of three form hydrates.

3.6. Trends in the melting points of the homologues series

We are in agreement with the general conception that the decrease in melting points was observed with an increase in the number of CH2 groups, with the caveat that the derivatives with a butyl spacer (1c, 2c, 3c and 4c) deviate from such trends (Hall & Reid, 1943[Hall, W. P. & Reid, E. E. (1943). J. Am. Chem. Soc. 65, 1466-1468.]; Thalladi, Boese & Weiss, 2000[Thalladi, V. R., Boese, R. & Weiss, H.-C. (2000a). Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 39, 918-922.]; Thalladi, Nüsse & Boese, 2000[Thalladi, V. R., Nüsse, M. & Boese, R. (2000b). J. Am. Chem. Soc. 122, 9227-9236.]). The butyl derivatives 1c, 2c and 3c are found to exhibit higher melting points than the corresponding ethyl (1b, 2b, 3b) and hexyl derivatives (1d, 2d, 3d and 4d). A further decrease in the melting point was observed for hydrates compared with their respective analogues. Phenyl and 4-pyrydyl derivatives have been shown to have higher melting points than the 3-pyridyl and 2-pyridyl derivatives. A similar tendency was also observed in the melting points of amides and reverse amides (Mukherjee & Biradha, 2011a[Mukherjee, G. & Biradha, K. (2011b). Cryst. Growth Des. 11, 5649-5658.]). No correlation of melting points was observed with either the dimensionality of the network or nature of the hydrogen bonds (N—H⋯O versus N—H⋯N) (Fig. 12[link]). Further, in a given series a linear increase in the densities of the derivatives was observed with an increase in the number of —(CH2)— groups with the exception of 1a. Interestingly, the densities of 4-pyridyl derivatives are found to be higher than those of the other three homologues. In contrast, the homologous series containing a phenyl substituent was found to exhibit lower densities than the other three series (Fig. S38).

[Figure 12]
Figure 12
Trends observed in the melting points of the homologous series.

3.7. Solid-state reactivities of 1c, 2b, 2c, 3a, 4a, 3c and 4c

The crystal structure analysis of 2b reveals that the double bonds are aligned for a single [2 + 2] reaction with a C⋯C distance (d1) between the double-bonded C atoms of 3.84 Å and C=C⋯C=C torsion of (τ2) 0°. The 1H NMR spectra of irradiated 2b in DMSO-d6 shows the appearance of cyclobutane protons at 4.44 and 4.03 p.p.m. with the presence of olefinic protons. From these observations it can be concluded that 2b was converted to a single dimer product in 59% yield after 72 h of irradiation in sunlight (Fig. 13[link]).

[Figure 13]
Figure 13
1H NMR in DMSO-d6 (a) of 2b, the peaks at 7.45 and 7.04 p.p.m. represent olefin protons; (b) of the single dimer of 2b, the presence of cyclobutane protons at 4.44 and 4.03 p.p.m. with unreacted olefin doublet (Ha and Hb) confirms the single [2 + 2] product.

As it was described earlier, the materials 1c, 2c, 3c and 4c have a required alignment for solid-state [2 + 2] polymerization reactions. The compounds 1c and 3c were shown by us earlier to undergo a polymerization reaction in a SCSC manner to yield crystalline covalent polymers. Although single crystals of 2c were not obtained, the comparison of XRPD patterns of 2c revealed that it also contains similar packing with two-dimensional (4,4)-layers as in 1c and 3c. Therefore, a polycrystalline material of 2c was irradiated in sunlight for 96 h. The irradiated product was found to be insoluble in common organic solvents similar to those of 1c and 3c. However, it was found to be soluble in DMSO or aqueous solution with a drop of HCl, HNO3 or H2SO4.

The 1H NMR spectra of an irradiated sample of 2c in DMSO-d6 and one drop of H2SO4 revealed that the reaction proceeds through the formation of oligomers as the resultant spectra contains some new peaks in addition to the peaks of the monomer and polymer. In the spectra the cyclobutane peaks of a polymer appeared at 4.27 and 4.64 p.p.m. and also the n-butyl protons of the polymer were found to exhibit an up-field shift from monomer to polymer, i.e. 3.22 to 2.56 p.p.m. and 1.51 to 0.77 p.p.m. For oligomers, the cyclobutane peaks appeared at the same p.p.m. as the polymer, however, the corresponding n-butyl peaks appeared at 3.05, 1.22 and 1.08 p.p.m.. From 1H NMR, the yield of the reaction including oligomers was found to be 45%. The result of the polymerization reaction observed here is in line with that of 3c albeit the yield of the polymer is not 100% in the present case. The unreacted 2c and oligomers were removed by repeatedly washing the irradiated material of 2c with hot methanol. The 1H NMR of the separated polymer in DMSO-d6 with one drop of H2SO4 reveals the presence of cyclobutane protons at 4.27 and 4.64 p.p.m. with n-butyl protons at 2.57 and 0.77 p.p.m. and the absence of olefin protons (Fig. 14[link]). However, unlike the polymer of 3c, the polymeric material of 2c does not result in the formation of plastic films.

[Figure 14]
Figure 14
1H-NMR spectra recorded at various stages of irradiation of compound 2c: (a) before irradiation, (b) after irradiation (monomer, oligomers and polymer) and (c) after separation of polymer from monomer and oligomers.

The molecular weight of the polymer (2c) was determined using MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight) with 2,5-dihydroxy benzoic acid (DHB) as a matrix in solution. The highest molecular ion peak was observed at 4415 (m/z), which corresponds to 12-mer of 2c (Fig. 15[link]).

[Figure 15]
Figure 15
MALDI-TOF mass data for 2c (irradiated).

Although 4c forms β-sheet type N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, the double bonds of 4c are aligned with the other layer and fulfil [2 + 2] photopolymerization criteria with appropriate geometrical parameters: d1 = 4.18 Å and τ2 = 0°. However, 4c was found to be photostable even after prolonged irradiation. The probable reason could be loss of the lattice water which triggers the structural transformation to an unreactive form. Indeed, it was found that the XRPD pattern of 4c which is recorded at room temperature does not match the calculated XRPD pattern of 4c indicating the loss of water. The single-crystal data for this material was collected at low temperature.

Similarly, compounds 3a and 4a were found to be photostable despite the possibility of single and double [2 + 2] reactions, respectively. The d1 and τ2 values for 3a and 4a are 3.909 Å and 0.74°, and 3.779 Å and 0°, respectively. The probable reason could be that in 3a the double bonds exhibit the higher displacement value of 1.9 Å, whereas in 4a the existence of infinite stacks rather than discrete dimers might have prevented the reaction (Gnanaguru et al., 1985[Gnanaguru, K., Ramasubbu, N., Venkatesan, K. & Ramamurthy, V. (1985). J. Org. Chem. 50, 2337-2346.]; Murthy et al., 1987[Murthy, G. S., Arjunan, P., Venkatesan, K. & Ramamurthy, V. (1987). Tetrahedron, 43, 1225-1240.]; Nagarathinam et al., 2008[Nagarathinam, M., Peedikakkal, A. M. P. & Vittal, J. J. (2008). Chem. Commun. pp. 5277-5288.]; Yang et al., 2009[Yang, S. Y., Naumov, P. & Fukuzumi, S. (2009). J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 7247-7249.]).

4. Conclusions

The homologous series exhibit variation in their crystal structures depending upon the spacers and end groups such as phenyl, 2-pyridyl, 3-pyridyl or 4-pyridyl. Unlike in previously studied series, in the current one the hydrazine spacer and 2-pyridyl derivatives were included for the first time. Some of the structural aspects observed here have direct correlations with those of amide/reverse amide homologues. For example, amide derivatives with a butyl spacer have previously been shown to form two-dimensional layers via N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds for both 3-pyridyl and 4-pyridyl derivatives (Sarkar & Biradha, 2006[Sarkar, M. & Biradha, K. (2006). Cryst. Growth Des. 6, 202-208.]). Similarly, in the current study the phenyl, 2-pyridyl and 3-pyridyl derivatives containing a butyl spacer form such a two-dimensional N—H⋯O hydrogen-bonded layer. However, the 4-pyridyl derivative deviates as it forms β-sheets which are linked further by water molecules. Further, all the derivatives containing a hexyl spacer exhibited β-sheets irrespective of the end attachments, which is in agreement with the amide derivatives containing a hexyl spacer and 3-pyridyl or 4-pyridyl attachments.

Supporting information


Computing details top

For all compounds, program(s) used to solve structure: SHELXS97 (Sheldrick, 1990); program(s) used to refine structure: SHELXL97 (Sheldrick, 1997).

(1a) top
Crystal data top
C18H16N2O2F(000) = 616
Mr = 292.33Dx = 1.239 Mg m3
Monoclinic, C2/cMo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
a = 18.451 (9) Åθ = 2.2–25.0°
b = 10.540 (5) ŵ = 0.08 mm1
c = 8.157 (4) ÅT = 293 K
β = 98.824 (12)°Block, white
V = 1567.6 (13) Å30.22 × 0.15 × 0.10 mm
Z = 4
Data collection top
Bruker CCD APEX-2
diffractometer
1377 independent reflections
Radiation source: fine-focus sealed tube775 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.064
hemisphere scansθmax = 25.0°, θmin = 2.2°
Absorption correction: empirical (using intensity measurements)
Sadabs
h = 2121
Tmin = 0.985, Tmax = 0.992k = 1212
7785 measured reflectionsl = 99
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Secondary atom site location: difference Fourier map
Least-squares matrix: fullHydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.055H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
wR(F2) = 0.193 w = 1/[σ2(Fo2) + (0.1P)2]
where P = (Fo2 + 2Fc2)/3
S = 1.10(Δ/σ)max < 0.001
1377 reflectionsΔρmax = 0.18 e Å3
101 parametersΔρmin = 0.16 e Å3
0 restraintsExtinction correction: SHELXL, Fc*=kFc[1+0.001xFc2λ3/sin(2θ)]-1/4
Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methodsExtinction coefficient: 0.010 (3)
Special details top

Geometry. All e.s.d.'s (except the e.s.d. in the dihedral angle between two l.s. planes) are estimated using the full covariance matrix. The cell e.s.d.'s are taken into account individually in the estimation of e.s.d.'s in distances, angles and torsion angles; correlations between e.s.d.'s in cell parameters are only used when they are defined by crystal symmetry. An approximate (isotropic) treatment of cell e.s.d.'s is used for estimating e.s.d.'s involving l.s. planes.

Refinement. Refinement of F2 against ALL reflections. The weighted R-factor wR and goodness of fit S are based on F2, conventional R-factors R are based on F, with F set to zero for negative F2. The threshold expression of F2 > σ(F2) is used only for calculating R-factors(gt) etc. and is not relevant to the choice of reflections for refinement. R-factors based on F2 are statistically about twice as large as those based on F, and R- factors based on ALL data will be even larger.

Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
C110.29320 (13)0.1397 (2)0.3674 (3)0.0535 (7)
C120.31705 (16)0.0734 (3)0.5099 (4)0.0767 (10)
H120.28370.02350.55590.092*
C130.38838 (16)0.0781 (4)0.5870 (4)0.0885 (12)
H130.40280.03110.68290.106*
C140.43840 (16)0.1518 (3)0.5235 (5)0.0802 (10)
H140.48710.15470.57440.096*
C150.41553 (15)0.2205 (3)0.3847 (4)0.0778 (10)
H150.44900.27200.34160.093*
C160.34386 (15)0.2158 (3)0.3057 (4)0.0681 (9)
H160.32960.26400.21070.082*
C170.21756 (14)0.1355 (2)0.2808 (3)0.0544 (8)
H170.20750.18390.18470.065*
C180.16157 (13)0.0706 (2)0.3239 (3)0.0522 (7)
H180.16870.02190.42010.063*
C190.08865 (13)0.0747 (2)0.2220 (3)0.0487 (7)
O110.07633 (9)0.12526 (18)0.0847 (2)0.0639 (7)
N210.03594 (10)0.0154 (2)0.2903 (2)0.0557 (7)
H210.04690.02260.38420.067*
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
C110.0421 (15)0.0630 (17)0.0538 (16)0.0005 (13)0.0018 (12)0.0037 (13)
C120.0461 (18)0.097 (2)0.082 (2)0.0161 (15)0.0058 (15)0.0215 (18)
C130.057 (2)0.102 (3)0.097 (3)0.0147 (18)0.0181 (18)0.032 (2)
C140.0464 (18)0.087 (2)0.102 (3)0.0051 (17)0.0070 (17)0.003 (2)
C150.0503 (19)0.076 (2)0.108 (3)0.0194 (16)0.0150 (18)0.007 (2)
C160.0615 (19)0.0664 (19)0.0742 (19)0.0075 (15)0.0035 (15)0.0068 (15)
C170.0487 (16)0.0618 (18)0.0503 (15)0.0012 (13)0.0003 (12)0.0058 (13)
C180.0429 (16)0.0663 (17)0.0440 (15)0.0055 (12)0.0043 (12)0.0052 (12)
C190.0420 (15)0.0592 (16)0.0411 (14)0.0047 (12)0.0051 (11)0.0094 (12)
O110.0557 (12)0.0826 (15)0.0483 (12)0.0018 (10)0.0083 (9)0.0032 (10)
N210.0361 (11)0.0785 (16)0.0467 (13)0.0017 (10)0.0115 (9)0.0045 (11)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
C11—C121.370 (4)C15—C161.380 (4)
C11—C161.384 (3)C17—C181.330 (3)
C11—C171.465 (4)C18—C191.470 (3)
C12—C131.370 (4)C19—O111.229 (3)
C13—C141.367 (4)C19—N211.347 (3)
C14—C151.356 (4)N21—N21i1.387 (4)
C12—C11—C16117.2 (3)C15—C16—C11120.2 (3)
C12—C11—C17123.5 (3)C18—C17—C11127.5 (3)
C16—C11—C17119.3 (3)C17—C18—C19121.1 (3)
C11—C12—C13122.1 (3)O11—C19—N21122.3 (2)
C14—C13—C12120.3 (3)O11—C19—C18123.6 (2)
C15—C14—C13118.5 (3)N21—C19—C18114.1 (2)
C14—C15—C16121.6 (3)C19—N21—N21i120.2 (2)
Symmetry code: (i) x, y, z+1/2.
(1b) top
Crystal data top
C20H20N2O2F(000) = 340
Mr = 320.38Dx = 1.313 Mg m3
Monoclinic, P21/cMo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
a = 17.899 (3) ÅCell parameters from 1579 reflections
b = 4.8544 (9) Åθ = 1.2–26.0°
c = 9.5259 (16) ŵ = 0.09 mm1
β = 101.847 (4)°T = 273 K
V = 810.1 (2) Å3Block, white
Z = 20.22 × 0.17 × 0.11 mm
Data collection top
Bruker CCD APEX-2
diffractometer
1579 independent reflections
Radiation source: fine-focus sealed tube1244 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.037
hemisphere scansθmax = 26.0°, θmin = 1.2°
Absorption correction: empirical (using intensity measurements)
sadabs
h = 2222
Tmin = 0.983, Tmax = 0.991k = 55
6423 measured reflectionsl = 1111
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Secondary atom site location: difference Fourier map
Least-squares matrix: fullHydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.037H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
wR(F2) = 0.107 w = 1/[σ2(Fo2) + (0.010P)2 + 0.9374P]
where P = (Fo2 + 2Fc2)/3
S = 1.21(Δ/σ)max < 0.001
1579 reflectionsΔρmax = 0.24 e Å3
110 parametersΔρmin = 0.25 e Å3
0 restraintsExtinction correction: SHELXL, Fc*=kFc[1+0.001xFc2λ3/sin(2θ)]-1/4
Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methodsExtinction coefficient: 0.0086 (11)
Special details top

Geometry. All e.s.d.'s (except the e.s.d. in the dihedral angle between two l.s. planes) are estimated using the full covariance matrix. The cell e.s.d.'s are taken into account individually in the estimation of e.s.d.'s in distances, angles and torsion angles; correlations between e.s.d.'s in cell parameters are only used when they are defined by crystal symmetry. An approximate (isotropic) treatment of cell e.s.d.'s is used for estimating e.s.d.'s involving l.s. planes.

Refinement. Refinement of F2 against ALL reflections. The weighted R-factor wR and goodness of fit S are based on F2, conventional R-factors R are based on F, with F set to zero for negative F2. The threshold expression of F2 > σ(F2) is used only for calculating R-factors(gt) etc. and is not relevant to the choice of reflections for refinement. R-factors based on F2 are statistically about twice as large as those based on F, and R- factors based on ALL data will be even larger.

Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
C70.26742 (11)0.2184 (5)0.7661 (2)0.0168 (5)
H70.26410.40490.74330.020*
C80.32637 (11)0.0795 (5)0.7378 (2)0.0152 (5)
H80.33220.10500.76410.018*
C90.38338 (11)0.2092 (5)0.6654 (2)0.0145 (5)
N10.42726 (9)0.0302 (4)0.61157 (17)0.0150 (4)
H100.42100.14350.62260.018*
C110.48509 (11)0.1220 (5)0.5351 (2)0.0159 (5)
H11A0.52670.20940.60150.019*
H11B0.46330.25600.46280.019*
O10.38996 (8)0.4614 (3)0.65419 (15)0.0190 (4)
C10.08866 (12)0.1368 (5)0.9407 (2)0.0207 (5)
H10.04930.21680.97680.025*
C20.16255 (12)0.2346 (5)0.9828 (2)0.0210 (5)
H20.17280.37921.04790.025*
C30.22127 (11)0.1179 (5)0.9283 (2)0.0180 (5)
H30.27070.18500.95700.022*
C40.20683 (11)0.0993 (5)0.8308 (2)0.0158 (5)
C50.13232 (12)0.1988 (5)0.7911 (2)0.0199 (5)
H50.12190.34640.72790.024*
C60.07364 (12)0.0795 (5)0.8453 (2)0.0215 (5)
H60.02410.14560.81710.026*
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
C70.0190 (10)0.0140 (12)0.0176 (10)0.0018 (9)0.0044 (8)0.0004 (9)
C80.0173 (10)0.0122 (12)0.0163 (10)0.0021 (9)0.0038 (8)0.0007 (9)
C90.0141 (9)0.0141 (12)0.0144 (9)0.0018 (9)0.0006 (7)0.0000 (9)
N10.0177 (8)0.0086 (10)0.0206 (9)0.0014 (8)0.0085 (7)0.0011 (7)
C110.0171 (10)0.0140 (12)0.0178 (10)0.0005 (9)0.0064 (8)0.0021 (9)
O10.0209 (8)0.0118 (9)0.0259 (8)0.0016 (7)0.0085 (6)0.0005 (7)
C10.0198 (10)0.0247 (14)0.0202 (10)0.0052 (10)0.0103 (8)0.0030 (10)
C20.0251 (11)0.0224 (13)0.0163 (10)0.0002 (10)0.0066 (8)0.0028 (9)
C30.0165 (10)0.0206 (13)0.0167 (10)0.0016 (10)0.0032 (8)0.0009 (9)
C40.0182 (10)0.0150 (12)0.0151 (9)0.0017 (9)0.0053 (8)0.0053 (9)
C50.0217 (11)0.0181 (13)0.0210 (10)0.0040 (10)0.0070 (8)0.0021 (9)
C60.0167 (10)0.0252 (14)0.0237 (11)0.0034 (10)0.0070 (8)0.0029 (10)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
C7—C81.326 (3)C1—C61.379 (3)
C7—C41.471 (3)C1—C21.385 (3)
C7—H70.9300C1—H10.9300
C8—C91.484 (3)C2—C31.385 (3)
C8—H80.9300C2—H20.9300
C9—O11.237 (3)C3—C41.394 (3)
C9—N11.342 (3)C3—H30.9300
N1—C111.452 (2)C4—C51.396 (3)
N1—H100.8600C5—C61.388 (3)
C11—C11i1.511 (4)C5—H50.9300
C11—H11A0.9700C6—H60.9300
C11—H11B0.9700
C8—C7—C4124.8 (2)C6—C1—C2119.8 (2)
C8—C7—H7117.6C6—C1—H1120.1
C4—C7—H7117.6C2—C1—H1120.1
C7—C8—C9122.0 (2)C3—C2—C1120.3 (2)
C7—C8—H8119.0C3—C2—H2119.8
C9—C8—H8119.0C1—C2—H2119.8
O1—C9—N1122.29 (18)C2—C3—C4120.5 (2)
O1—C9—C8123.17 (19)C2—C3—H3119.7
N1—C9—C8114.53 (19)C4—C3—H3119.7
C9—N1—C11121.77 (18)C3—C4—C5118.58 (19)
C9—N1—H10119.1C3—C4—C7121.65 (19)
C11—N1—H10119.1C5—C4—C7119.7 (2)
N1—C11—C11i109.6 (2)C6—C5—C4120.6 (2)
N1—C11—H11A109.8C6—C5—H5119.7
C11i—C11—H11A109.8C4—C5—H5119.7
N1—C11—H11B109.8C1—C6—C5120.2 (2)
C11i—C11—H11B109.8C1—C6—H6119.9
H11A—C11—H11B108.2C5—C6—H6119.9
Symmetry code: (i) x+1, y, z+1.
(1d) top
Crystal data top
C24H28N2O2F(000) = 808
Mr = 376.48Dx = 1.207 Mg m3
Monoclinic, P21/cMo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
a = 20.243 (5) ÅCell parameters from 1665 reflections
b = 4.9756 (14) Åθ = 2.0–25.0°
c = 20.839 (6) ŵ = 0.08 mm1
β = 99.148 (8)°T = 293 K
V = 2072.2 (10) Å3Plate like, white
Z = 40.32 × 0.21 × 0.18 mm
Data collection top
Bruker CCD APEX-2
diffractometer
3439 independent reflections
Radiation source: fine-focus sealed tube1665 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.123
hemisphere scansθmax = 25.0°, θmin = 2.0°
Absorption correction: empirical (using intensity measurements)
sadabs
h = 2424
Tmin = 0.985, Tmax = 0.986k = 55
21630 measured reflectionsl = 2324
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methods
Least-squares matrix: fullSecondary atom site location: difference Fourier map
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.079Hydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
wR(F2) = 0.201H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
S = 0.95 w = 1/[σ2(Fo2) + (0.1P)2]
where P = (Fo2 + 2Fc2)/3
3439 reflections(Δ/σ)max < 0.001
253 parametersΔρmax = 0.18 e Å3
0 restraintsΔρmin = 0.18 e Å3
Special details top

Geometry. All e.s.d.'s (except the e.s.d. in the dihedral angle between two l.s. planes) are estimated using the full covariance matrix. The cell e.s.d.'s are taken into account individually in the estimation of e.s.d.'s in distances, angles and torsion angles; correlations between e.s.d.'s in cell parameters are only used when they are defined by crystal symmetry. An approximate (isotropic) treatment of cell e.s.d.'s is used for estimating e.s.d.'s involving l.s. planes.

Refinement. Refinement of F2 against ALL reflections. The weighted R-factor wR and goodness of fit S are based on F2, conventional R-factors R are based on F, with F set to zero for negative F2. The threshold expression of F2 > σ(F2) is used only for calculating R-factors(gt) etc. and is not relevant to the choice of reflections for refinement. R-factors based on F2 are statistically about twice as large as those based on F, and R- factors based on ALL data will be even larger.

Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
O110.16814 (14)0.8440 (5)0.31534 (13)0.0701 (9)
C110.31957 (17)0.5752 (8)0.47170 (17)0.0496 (10)
C120.3636 (2)0.3761 (10)0.4615 (2)0.0873 (15)
H120.35670.27890.42290.105*
C130.4182 (2)0.3192 (11)0.5082 (3)0.1016 (18)
H130.44780.18410.50070.122*
C140.4291 (2)0.4584 (12)0.5649 (2)0.0903 (16)
H140.46570.41930.59640.108*
C150.3858 (3)0.6547 (13)0.5747 (2)0.1003 (18)
H150.39270.75120.61340.120*
C160.3318 (2)0.7138 (10)0.5286 (2)0.0784 (14)
H160.30300.85140.53630.094*
C170.26320 (17)0.6471 (7)0.42176 (17)0.0492 (9)
H170.24480.81650.42560.059*
C180.23513 (18)0.5011 (7)0.37177 (17)0.0523 (10)
H180.24950.32480.36850.063*
C190.18211 (18)0.6045 (8)0.32079 (17)0.0480 (9)
O210.18393 (13)0.4679 (5)0.06957 (13)0.0716 (9)
C210.33587 (19)0.1893 (8)0.22411 (17)0.0547 (10)
C220.3266 (2)0.0151 (9)0.26633 (19)0.0695 (12)
H220.28600.10650.26090.083*
C230.3760 (2)0.0858 (10)0.3160 (2)0.0800 (14)
H230.36910.22760.34320.096*
C240.4357 (2)0.0507 (10)0.3260 (2)0.0758 (14)
H240.46870.00550.36070.091*
C250.4462 (2)0.2517 (10)0.2850 (2)0.0819 (14)
H250.48710.34110.29040.098*
C260.3964 (2)0.3228 (9)0.2354 (2)0.0810 (14)
H260.40370.46530.20850.097*
C270.28519 (18)0.2705 (7)0.16984 (18)0.0552 (10)
H270.28680.44830.15640.066*
C280.23715 (17)0.1197 (7)0.13755 (17)0.0513 (10)
H280.23300.05770.15040.062*
C290.19003 (17)0.2248 (8)0.08177 (18)0.0519 (10)
N310.15168 (14)0.4220 (6)0.27998 (13)0.0507 (8)
H310.16230.25590.28660.061*
N320.15478 (14)0.0403 (6)0.04425 (14)0.0538 (8)
H320.15980.12610.05510.065*
C310.10147 (18)0.4888 (7)0.22482 (17)0.0533 (10)
H31A0.12280.57740.19210.064*
H31B0.06970.61390.23860.064*
C320.06463 (17)0.2459 (7)0.19545 (17)0.0519 (10)
H32A0.09640.12070.18190.062*
H32B0.04320.15770.22820.062*
C330.01243 (18)0.3140 (7)0.13789 (17)0.0536 (10)
H33A0.03350.41190.10640.064*
H33B0.02070.43120.15210.064*
C340.02279 (17)0.0675 (7)0.10498 (17)0.0516 (10)
H34A0.01040.05200.09170.062*
H34B0.04490.02800.13620.062*
C350.07410 (17)0.1373 (7)0.04596 (17)0.0504 (10)
H35A0.10740.25630.05920.061*
H35B0.05210.23270.01470.061*
C360.10849 (17)0.1082 (7)0.01383 (17)0.0509 (10)
H36A0.07500.23160.00260.061*
H36B0.13260.19860.04430.061*
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
O110.077 (2)0.0424 (18)0.081 (2)0.0035 (14)0.0183 (16)0.0017 (15)
C110.044 (2)0.057 (3)0.045 (2)0.0105 (19)0.0007 (18)0.002 (2)
C120.089 (3)0.085 (4)0.077 (3)0.022 (3)0.022 (3)0.020 (3)
C130.085 (4)0.100 (4)0.106 (4)0.033 (3)0.024 (3)0.009 (4)
C140.073 (3)0.106 (4)0.079 (4)0.008 (3)0.026 (3)0.022 (3)
C150.083 (4)0.155 (5)0.057 (3)0.003 (4)0.008 (3)0.024 (3)
C160.069 (3)0.101 (4)0.061 (3)0.002 (3)0.003 (3)0.020 (3)
C170.049 (2)0.046 (2)0.052 (2)0.0014 (18)0.0065 (19)0.0045 (19)
C180.055 (2)0.040 (2)0.058 (2)0.0024 (19)0.002 (2)0.006 (2)
C190.052 (2)0.042 (2)0.048 (2)0.0004 (19)0.0020 (19)0.0010 (19)
O210.082 (2)0.0348 (17)0.085 (2)0.0017 (14)0.0250 (16)0.0029 (14)
C210.062 (3)0.049 (2)0.050 (2)0.006 (2)0.001 (2)0.005 (2)
C220.061 (3)0.082 (3)0.063 (3)0.002 (2)0.003 (2)0.012 (3)
C230.086 (3)0.084 (3)0.067 (3)0.002 (3)0.006 (3)0.024 (3)
C240.070 (3)0.105 (4)0.048 (3)0.022 (3)0.004 (2)0.008 (3)
C250.064 (3)0.099 (4)0.075 (3)0.007 (3)0.015 (3)0.010 (3)
C260.082 (3)0.069 (3)0.079 (3)0.017 (3)0.029 (3)0.019 (3)
C270.063 (3)0.038 (2)0.060 (2)0.001 (2)0.006 (2)0.0050 (19)
C280.052 (2)0.036 (2)0.062 (2)0.0025 (18)0.0038 (19)0.0001 (19)
C290.047 (2)0.043 (2)0.064 (3)0.0012 (19)0.002 (2)0.002 (2)
N310.0564 (19)0.0383 (19)0.0519 (18)0.0074 (15)0.0079 (16)0.0042 (15)
N320.0546 (19)0.0328 (18)0.066 (2)0.0034 (15)0.0150 (16)0.0028 (16)
C310.061 (2)0.041 (2)0.053 (2)0.0013 (19)0.0030 (19)0.0029 (19)
C320.056 (2)0.046 (2)0.051 (2)0.0042 (19)0.0012 (19)0.0009 (18)
C330.061 (2)0.043 (2)0.052 (2)0.0013 (19)0.0063 (19)0.0008 (19)
C340.046 (2)0.049 (2)0.056 (2)0.0037 (18)0.0018 (18)0.001 (2)
C350.051 (2)0.042 (2)0.055 (2)0.0008 (18)0.0029 (19)0.0016 (18)
C360.050 (2)0.041 (2)0.058 (2)0.0025 (17)0.0019 (19)0.0016 (19)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
O11—C191.226 (4)C22—C231.365 (5)
C11—C161.360 (5)C23—C241.374 (6)
C11—C121.372 (5)C24—C251.354 (6)
C11—C171.462 (5)C25—C261.371 (5)
C12—C131.380 (6)C27—C281.324 (4)
C13—C141.357 (6)C28—C291.477 (5)
C14—C151.350 (7)C29—N321.336 (4)
C15—C161.366 (6)N31—C311.447 (4)
C17—C181.322 (4)N32—C361.448 (4)
C18—C191.477 (5)C31—C321.499 (5)
C19—N311.327 (4)C32—C331.505 (5)
O21—C291.238 (4)C33—C341.525 (5)
C21—C261.381 (5)C34—C351.518 (5)
C21—C221.377 (5)C35—C361.509 (5)
C21—C271.458 (5)
C16—C11—C12117.9 (4)C22—C23—C24120.6 (4)
C16—C11—C17120.7 (4)C25—C24—C23119.5 (4)
C12—C11—C17121.3 (4)C24—C25—C26119.8 (4)
C11—C12—C13120.4 (4)C25—C26—C21122.0 (4)
C14—C13—C12120.6 (5)C28—C27—C21127.3 (4)
C15—C14—C13118.8 (5)C27—C28—C29122.0 (3)
C14—C15—C16121.0 (5)O21—C29—N32121.6 (4)
C15—C16—C11121.3 (5)O21—C29—C28122.6 (3)
C18—C17—C11128.0 (4)N32—C29—C28115.8 (3)
C17—C18—C19123.2 (4)C19—N31—C31123.2 (3)
O11—C19—N31121.9 (3)C29—N32—C36122.9 (3)
O11—C19—C18122.4 (4)N31—C31—C32112.4 (3)
N31—C19—C18115.6 (3)C33—C32—C31112.6 (3)
C26—C21—C22117.0 (4)C32—C33—C34113.3 (3)
C26—C21—C27119.7 (4)C35—C34—C33113.0 (3)
C22—C21—C27123.3 (4)C36—C35—C34112.5 (3)
C23—C22—C21121.1 (4)N32—C36—C35111.9 (3)
(2a) top
Crystal data top
C16H14N4O2F(000) = 308
Mr = 294.31Dx = 1.378 Mg m3
Monoclinic, P21/nMo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
a = 4.7315 (10) ÅCell parameters from 1426 reflections
b = 9.213 (2) Åθ = 2.5–26.4°
c = 16.390 (4) ŵ = 0.10 mm1
β = 97.020 (6)°T = 100 K
V = 709.1 (3) Å3Needle, yellow
Z = 20.23 × 0.16 × 0.11 mm
Data collection top
Bruker CCD APEX-2
diffractometer
1426 independent reflections
Radiation source: fine-focus sealed tube1121 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.045
hemisphere scansθmax = 26.4°, θmin = 2.5°
Absorption correction: empirical (using intensity measurements)
sadabs
h = 55
Tmin = 0.982, Tmax = 0.990k = 1111
8536 measured reflectionsl = 1819
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methods
Least-squares matrix: fullSecondary atom site location: difference Fourier map
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.040Hydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
wR(F2) = 0.132H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
S = 0.97 w = 1/[σ2(Fo2) + (0.1P)2]
where P = (Fo2 + 2Fc2)/3
1426 reflections(Δ/σ)max < 0.001
100 parametersΔρmax = 0.29 e Å3
0 restraintsΔρmin = 0.26 e Å3
Special details top

Geometry. All e.s.d.'s (except the e.s.d. in the dihedral angle between two l.s. planes) are estimated using the full covariance matrix. The cell e.s.d.'s are taken into account individually in the estimation of e.s.d.'s in distances, angles and torsion angles; correlations between e.s.d.'s in cell parameters are only used when they are defined by crystal symmetry. An approximate (isotropic) treatment of cell e.s.d.'s is used for estimating e.s.d.'s involving l.s. planes.

Refinement. Refinement of F2 against ALL reflections. The weighted R-factor wR and goodness of fit S are based on F2, conventional R-factors R are based on F, with F set to zero for negative F2. The threshold expression of F2 > σ(F2) is used only for calculating R-factors(gt) etc. and is not relevant to the choice of reflections for refinement. R-factors based on F2 are statistically about twice as large as those based on F, and R- factors based on ALL data will be even larger.

Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
O110.1033 (2)0.84218 (10)0.97965 (7)0.0269 (3)
N110.5765 (3)0.47208 (12)0.81372 (8)0.0240 (3)
C110.3809 (3)0.45491 (14)0.86617 (9)0.0195 (4)
C120.6391 (3)0.35610 (16)0.77069 (11)0.0289 (4)
H120.77250.36690.73390.035*
C130.5175 (3)0.22029 (16)0.77740 (10)0.0287 (4)
H130.56890.14250.74620.034*
C140.3192 (3)0.20367 (15)0.83128 (10)0.0285 (4)
H140.23380.11400.83730.034*
C150.2479 (3)0.32260 (14)0.87673 (10)0.0246 (4)
H150.11380.31400.91350.030*
C160.3054 (3)0.58361 (15)0.91124 (9)0.0201 (4)
H160.14020.57920.93660.024*
C170.4544 (3)0.70650 (14)0.91884 (9)0.0193 (4)
H170.62640.71300.89700.023*
C180.3481 (3)0.83227 (13)0.96160 (9)0.0192 (4)
N210.5390 (2)0.94039 (11)0.97844 (7)0.0190 (3)
H210.70550.93510.96260.023*
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
O110.0166 (6)0.0199 (5)0.0456 (8)0.0006 (4)0.0091 (5)0.0065 (4)
N110.0236 (7)0.0230 (6)0.0259 (7)0.0016 (5)0.0052 (6)0.0037 (5)
C110.0173 (7)0.0198 (7)0.0205 (8)0.0012 (5)0.0014 (6)0.0001 (5)
C120.0282 (9)0.0306 (9)0.0283 (9)0.0050 (6)0.0057 (7)0.0051 (7)
C130.0327 (9)0.0235 (8)0.0281 (9)0.0075 (6)0.0034 (7)0.0086 (6)
C140.0330 (9)0.0184 (7)0.0317 (10)0.0008 (6)0.0053 (7)0.0003 (6)
C150.0259 (8)0.0214 (7)0.0260 (9)0.0005 (6)0.0011 (7)0.0007 (6)
C160.0170 (8)0.0211 (7)0.0226 (8)0.0022 (5)0.0040 (6)0.0005 (6)
C170.0158 (7)0.0188 (7)0.0236 (8)0.0015 (5)0.0038 (6)0.0006 (6)
C180.0152 (7)0.0184 (7)0.0240 (8)0.0001 (5)0.0019 (6)0.0006 (6)
N210.0138 (6)0.0157 (6)0.0291 (8)0.0009 (4)0.0087 (5)0.0030 (5)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
O11—C181.2332 (17)C13—C141.373 (2)
N11—C121.3334 (18)C14—C151.390 (2)
N11—C111.3471 (19)C16—C171.331 (2)
C11—C151.3925 (19)C17—C181.4742 (19)
C11—C161.4642 (19)C18—N211.3503 (18)
C12—C131.387 (2)N21—N21i1.381 (2)
C12—N11—C11117.24 (12)C11—C15—C14118.72 (15)
N11—C11—C15122.58 (13)C17—C16—C11125.23 (13)
N11—C11—C16117.12 (12)C16—C17—C18120.36 (13)
C15—C11—C16120.28 (14)O11—C18—N21121.39 (12)
N11—C12—C13124.05 (16)O11—C18—C17123.86 (12)
C12—C13—C14118.30 (14)N21—C18—C17114.73 (12)
C13—C14—C15119.12 (14)C18—N21—N21i118.52 (14)
Symmetry code: (i) x+1, y+2, z+2.
(2b) top
Crystal data top
C18H18N4O2.4(H2O)F(000) = 840
Mr = 394.43Dx = 1.289 Mg m3
Monoclinic, P21/cMo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
a = 9.3530 (6) ÅCell parameters from 3779 reflections
b = 10.9015 (7) Åθ = 2.0–25.5°
c = 19.9985 (14) ŵ = 0.10 mm1
β = 94.547 (2)°T = 293 K
V = 2032.7 (2) Å3Rod like, dark brown
Z = 40.22 × 0.17 × 0.13 mm
Data collection top
Bruker CCD APEX-2
diffractometer
3779 independent reflections
Radiation source: fine-focus sealed tube2449 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.044
hemisphere scansθmax = 25.5°, θmin = 2.0°
Absorption correction: empirical (using intensity measurements)
sadabs
h = 1111
Tmin = 0.980, Tmax = 0.987k = 1312
24231 measured reflectionsl = 2424
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methods
Least-squares matrix: fullSecondary atom site location: difference Fourier map
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.064Hydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
wR(F2) = 0.203H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
S = 1.28 w = 1/[σ2(Fo2) + (0.1P)2]
where P = (Fo2 + 2Fc2)/3
3779 reflections(Δ/σ)max < 0.001
253 parametersΔρmax = 0.47 e Å3
0 restraintsΔρmin = 0.20 e Å3
Special details top

Geometry. All e.s.d.'s (except the e.s.d. in the dihedral angle between two l.s. planes) are estimated using the full covariance matrix. The cell e.s.d.'s are taken into account individually in the estimation of e.s.d.'s in distances, angles and torsion angles; correlations between e.s.d.'s in cell parameters are only used when they are defined by crystal symmetry. An approximate (isotropic) treatment of cell e.s.d.'s is used for estimating e.s.d.'s involving l.s. planes.

Refinement. Refinement of F2 against ALL reflections. The weighted R-factor wR and goodness of fit S are based on F2, conventional R-factors R are based on F, with F set to zero for negative F2. The threshold expression of F2 > σ(F2) is used only for calculating R-factors(gt) etc. and is not relevant to the choice of reflections for refinement. R-factors based on F2 are statistically about twice as large as those based on F, and R- factors based on ALL data will be even larger.

Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
O110.1422 (2)0.0073 (2)0.33216 (9)0.0682 (6)
N110.2023 (2)0.1162 (2)0.58079 (10)0.0496 (6)
C110.2696 (3)0.0384 (2)0.54121 (12)0.0449 (6)
C120.2581 (3)0.1299 (3)0.64357 (13)0.0630 (8)
H120.21300.18380.67120.076*
C150.3895 (3)0.0278 (3)0.56545 (14)0.0590 (8)
H150.43210.08290.53760.071*
C130.3794 (3)0.0687 (3)0.67030 (14)0.0675 (9)
H130.41530.08240.71440.081*
C140.4452 (3)0.0120 (3)0.63053 (15)0.0680 (9)
H140.52600.05530.64710.082*
C160.2159 (3)0.0270 (2)0.47068 (12)0.0472 (6)
H160.26340.02850.44490.057*
C170.1080 (3)0.0868 (2)0.44000 (11)0.0458 (6)
H170.05340.13880.46460.055*
C180.0715 (3)0.0731 (3)0.36711 (12)0.0476 (6)
N210.4857 (2)0.1713 (2)0.05237 (10)0.0528 (6)
O210.4538 (2)0.1537 (2)0.20594 (10)0.0776 (7)
C210.5815 (3)0.1447 (2)0.00779 (12)0.0439 (6)
C220.5326 (3)0.1699 (3)0.11685 (14)0.0635 (8)
H220.46730.18790.14820.076*
C230.6716 (3)0.1435 (3)0.14035 (14)0.0655 (8)
H230.69940.14510.18600.079*
C240.7669 (3)0.1150 (3)0.09493 (15)0.0637 (8)
H240.86140.09590.10890.076*
C250.7213 (3)0.1151 (3)0.02813 (14)0.0546 (7)
H250.78500.09500.00360.066*
C260.5347 (3)0.1488 (2)0.06425 (12)0.0492 (7)
H260.60060.12260.09370.059*
C270.4100 (3)0.1854 (3)0.09104 (12)0.0501 (7)
H270.34160.21100.06280.060*
C280.3727 (3)0.1878 (2)0.16455 (12)0.0468 (6)
N310.0411 (2)0.1383 (2)0.34218 (9)0.0529 (6)
H310.08520.18440.36870.064*
N320.2429 (2)0.2299 (2)0.18279 (10)0.0544 (6)
H320.18960.25250.15190.065*
C310.0917 (3)0.1339 (3)0.27145 (13)0.0629 (8)
H31A0.14440.05830.26240.075*
H31B0.01000.13400.24450.075*
C320.1857 (3)0.2398 (3)0.25212 (13)0.0587 (8)
H32A0.26420.24300.28100.070*
H32B0.13130.31530.25820.070*
O1W0.04088 (19)0.27366 (19)0.57118 (9)0.0622 (6)
O2W1.0967 (2)0.0129 (2)0.11611 (11)0.0764 (7)
O3W0.2816 (3)0.0647 (4)0.22053 (12)0.1463 (15)
O4W0.18024 (19)0.29995 (19)0.44367 (9)0.0606 (6)
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
O110.0773 (13)0.0850 (16)0.0424 (10)0.0317 (12)0.0051 (9)0.0066 (9)
N110.0500 (13)0.0562 (15)0.0423 (11)0.0041 (11)0.0014 (9)0.0020 (10)
C110.0417 (14)0.0493 (16)0.0428 (13)0.0008 (12)0.0021 (11)0.0056 (11)
C120.0701 (19)0.075 (2)0.0438 (15)0.0075 (16)0.0052 (14)0.0037 (13)
C150.0562 (17)0.065 (2)0.0553 (16)0.0149 (15)0.0009 (13)0.0041 (13)
C130.067 (2)0.092 (2)0.0416 (15)0.0000 (18)0.0094 (14)0.0054 (15)
C140.0590 (18)0.085 (2)0.0579 (17)0.0132 (17)0.0106 (14)0.0123 (16)
C160.0469 (14)0.0504 (17)0.0447 (14)0.0032 (12)0.0066 (12)0.0002 (11)
C170.0454 (14)0.0552 (17)0.0369 (13)0.0065 (12)0.0038 (11)0.0014 (11)
C180.0486 (15)0.0568 (17)0.0377 (13)0.0044 (13)0.0048 (11)0.0005 (12)
N210.0474 (12)0.0656 (16)0.0450 (12)0.0110 (11)0.0015 (10)0.0019 (10)
O210.0568 (12)0.123 (2)0.0537 (12)0.0086 (12)0.0082 (10)0.0167 (12)
C210.0438 (14)0.0448 (16)0.0427 (13)0.0019 (12)0.0008 (11)0.0003 (11)
C220.0594 (18)0.088 (2)0.0438 (15)0.0121 (16)0.0064 (13)0.0025 (14)
C230.0668 (19)0.083 (2)0.0440 (15)0.0037 (17)0.0097 (14)0.0049 (14)
C240.0415 (16)0.079 (2)0.0687 (19)0.0020 (15)0.0088 (14)0.0098 (16)
C250.0412 (15)0.065 (2)0.0579 (16)0.0019 (13)0.0054 (12)0.0011 (13)
C260.0469 (15)0.0555 (18)0.0452 (14)0.0013 (13)0.0036 (12)0.0053 (12)
C270.0426 (15)0.0628 (19)0.0448 (14)0.0009 (13)0.0021 (11)0.0050 (12)
C280.0472 (15)0.0533 (17)0.0400 (13)0.0047 (13)0.0053 (11)0.0079 (11)
N310.0545 (13)0.0712 (17)0.0325 (11)0.0161 (12)0.0004 (9)0.0028 (10)
N320.0508 (13)0.0729 (17)0.0383 (11)0.0083 (12)0.0042 (9)0.0096 (10)
C310.0700 (19)0.080 (2)0.0375 (14)0.0149 (16)0.0030 (13)0.0019 (13)
C320.0673 (18)0.063 (2)0.0428 (14)0.0052 (15)0.0124 (13)0.0014 (12)
O1W0.0507 (11)0.0800 (15)0.0557 (11)0.0107 (10)0.0031 (9)0.0056 (10)
O2W0.0650 (13)0.0837 (17)0.0787 (15)0.0005 (11)0.0047 (11)0.0040 (12)
O3W0.0964 (19)0.277 (4)0.0621 (15)0.087 (2)0.0112 (14)0.029 (2)
O4W0.0501 (11)0.0769 (15)0.0545 (11)0.0095 (10)0.0027 (8)0.0008 (9)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
O11—C181.230 (3)O21—C281.224 (3)
N11—C121.329 (3)C21—C251.377 (3)
N11—C111.349 (3)C21—C261.473 (3)
C11—C151.388 (4)C22—C231.377 (4)
C11—C161.465 (3)C23—C241.357 (4)
C12—C131.387 (4)C24—C251.370 (4)
C15—C141.374 (4)C26—C271.306 (3)
C13—C141.365 (4)C27—C281.484 (3)
C16—C171.312 (3)C28—N321.321 (3)
C17—C181.478 (3)N31—C311.456 (3)
C18—N311.334 (3)N32—C321.450 (3)
N21—C221.329 (3)C31—C321.484 (4)
N21—C211.344 (3)
C12—N11—C11117.3 (2)N21—C21—C26118.7 (2)
N11—C11—C15121.6 (2)C25—C21—C26119.8 (2)
N11—C11—C16118.5 (2)N21—C22—C23124.3 (3)
C15—C11—C16119.9 (2)C24—C23—C22118.1 (3)
N11—C12—C13123.9 (3)C23—C24—C25118.8 (3)
C14—C15—C11120.0 (3)C21—C25—C24120.2 (2)
C12—C13—C14118.6 (3)C27—C26—C21126.6 (2)
C15—C14—C13118.6 (3)C26—C27—C28122.9 (2)
C17—C16—C11126.9 (2)O21—C28—N32121.6 (2)
C16—C17—C18121.3 (2)O21—C28—C27123.7 (2)
O11—C18—N31122.8 (2)N32—C28—C27114.7 (2)
O11—C18—C17121.8 (2)C18—N31—C31122.1 (2)
N31—C18—C17115.4 (2)C28—N32—C32123.5 (2)
C22—N21—C21117.1 (2)N31—C31—C32111.6 (2)
N21—C21—C25121.5 (2)N32—C32—C31110.9 (2)
(2d) top
Crystal data top
C22H26N4O2.2(H2O)F(000) = 444
Mr = 414.50Dx = 1.233 Mg m3
Monoclinic, P21/cMo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
a = 7.6364 (14) ÅCell parameters from 2068 reflections
b = 30.058 (5) Åθ = 2.7–25.5°
c = 4.8885 (9) ŵ = 0.09 mm1
β = 95.523 (6)°T = 293 K
V = 1116.9 (3) Å3Plate like, deep brown
Z = 20.27 × 0.19 × 0.11 mm
Data collection top
Bruker CCD APEX-2
diffractometer
2068 independent reflections
Radiation source: fine-focus sealed tube820 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.168
hemisphere scansθmax = 25.5°, θmin = 2.7°
Absorption correction: empirical (using intensity measurements)
sadabs
h = 89
Tmin = 0.981, Tmax = 0.991k = 3635
13588 measured reflectionsl = 55
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Secondary atom site location: difference Fourier map
Least-squares matrix: fullHydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.071H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
wR(F2) = 0.200 w = 1/[σ2(Fo2) + (0.1P)2]
where P = (Fo2 + 2Fc2)/3
S = 0.90(Δ/σ)max < 0.001
2068 reflectionsΔρmax = 0.39 e Å3
137 parametersΔρmin = 0.19 e Å3
0 restraintsExtinction correction: SHELXL, Fc*=kFc[1+0.001xFc2λ3/sin(2θ)]-1/4
Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methodsExtinction coefficient: 0.026 (6)
Special details top

Geometry. All e.s.d.'s (except the e.s.d. in the dihedral angle between two l.s. planes) are estimated using the full covariance matrix. The cell e.s.d.'s are taken into account individually in the estimation of e.s.d.'s in distances, angles and torsion angles; correlations between e.s.d.'s in cell parameters are only used when they are defined by crystal symmetry. An approximate (isotropic) treatment of cell e.s.d.'s is used for estimating e.s.d.'s involving l.s. planes.

Refinement. Refinement of F2 against ALL reflections. The weighted R-factor wR and goodness of fit S are based on F2, conventional R-factors R are based on F, with F set to zero for negative F2. The threshold expression of F2 > σ(F2) is used only for calculating R-factors(gt) etc. and is not relevant to the choice of reflections for refinement. R-factors based on F2 are statistically about twice as large as those based on F, and R- factors based on ALL data will be even larger.

Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
N110.5217 (4)0.32279 (12)0.3902 (7)0.0620 (10)
O110.1135 (3)0.42063 (9)0.1004 (5)0.0597 (9)
C110.5518 (5)0.34939 (13)0.1694 (8)0.0508 (11)
C120.6569 (7)0.29807 (16)0.4633 (10)0.0829 (15)
H120.63720.27920.61410.099*
C130.8229 (7)0.29939 (18)0.3253 (13)0.0828 (17)
H130.91290.28210.38450.099*
C140.8537 (6)0.32582 (17)0.1048 (12)0.0822 (16)
H140.96450.32730.00820.099*
C150.7152 (5)0.35074 (14)0.0264 (9)0.0668 (13)
H150.73320.36890.12760.080*
C160.4048 (5)0.37584 (12)0.0924 (8)0.0526 (11)
H160.41230.38610.08790.063*
C170.2626 (4)0.38682 (12)0.2506 (7)0.0443 (10)
H170.24950.37700.43180.053*
C180.1233 (5)0.41438 (12)0.1483 (8)0.0438 (10)
N210.0071 (4)0.43173 (9)0.3407 (6)0.0471 (9)
H210.01590.42590.51110.057*
C210.1339 (5)0.46039 (13)0.2654 (8)0.0551 (11)
H21A0.08560.48950.21740.066*
H21B0.18040.44820.10330.066*
C220.2818 (5)0.46572 (13)0.4870 (7)0.0524 (11)
H22A0.33100.43670.53670.063*
H22B0.23710.47850.64880.063*
C230.4255 (5)0.49560 (13)0.3934 (7)0.0536 (11)
H23A0.47180.48200.23550.064*
H23B0.37330.52380.33390.064*
O1W0.2085 (4)0.72650 (10)0.3993 (6)0.0878 (11)
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
N110.058 (2)0.070 (2)0.060 (2)0.0181 (19)0.0157 (19)0.003 (2)
O110.0675 (19)0.082 (2)0.0303 (15)0.0229 (15)0.0056 (13)0.0044 (14)
C110.042 (3)0.059 (3)0.053 (3)0.009 (2)0.009 (2)0.008 (2)
C120.085 (4)0.082 (4)0.085 (4)0.028 (3)0.027 (3)0.004 (3)
C130.054 (3)0.088 (4)0.110 (5)0.021 (3)0.029 (3)0.025 (3)
C140.045 (3)0.083 (4)0.118 (5)0.007 (3)0.004 (3)0.024 (4)
C150.052 (3)0.068 (3)0.079 (3)0.005 (2)0.000 (3)0.009 (3)
C160.050 (3)0.062 (3)0.047 (2)0.007 (2)0.009 (2)0.000 (2)
C170.040 (2)0.059 (3)0.035 (2)0.0104 (19)0.0069 (19)0.0003 (19)
C180.040 (2)0.053 (2)0.038 (2)0.0048 (19)0.0041 (19)0.001 (2)
N210.048 (2)0.059 (2)0.0345 (18)0.0170 (16)0.0074 (16)0.0047 (15)
C210.049 (3)0.068 (3)0.049 (2)0.017 (2)0.006 (2)0.010 (2)
C220.047 (2)0.068 (3)0.042 (2)0.013 (2)0.0016 (19)0.006 (2)
C230.047 (3)0.070 (3)0.043 (2)0.013 (2)0.0035 (18)0.011 (2)
O1W0.068 (2)0.115 (3)0.082 (2)0.0028 (18)0.0144 (18)0.0003 (19)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
N11—C111.345 (5)C16—C171.313 (5)
N11—C121.348 (5)C17—C181.473 (5)
O11—C181.239 (4)C18—N211.335 (4)
C11—C151.371 (5)N21—C211.454 (4)
C11—C161.455 (5)C21—C221.497 (5)
C12—C131.378 (6)C22—C231.522 (5)
C13—C141.341 (6)C23—C23i1.491 (7)
C14—C151.380 (6)
C11—N11—C12117.7 (4)C16—C17—C18121.6 (4)
N11—C11—C15120.2 (4)O11—C18—N21122.2 (3)
N11—C11—C16117.1 (4)O11—C18—C17122.1 (3)
C15—C11—C16122.6 (4)N21—C18—C17115.6 (3)
N11—C12—C13123.1 (5)C18—N21—C21120.7 (3)
C14—C13—C12119.5 (5)N21—C21—C22114.0 (3)
C13—C14—C15117.7 (5)C21—C22—C23111.2 (3)
C11—C15—C14121.8 (5)C23i—C23—C22114.7 (4)
C17—C16—C11126.9 (4)
Symmetry code: (i) x+1, y+1, z+1.
(3a) top
Crystal data top
C16H14N4O2F(000) = 616
Mr = 294.31Dx = 1.393 Mg m3
Monoclinic, P21/cMo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
a = 10.403 (6) ÅCell parameters from 2475 reflections
b = 7.160 (4) Åθ = 2.0–25.0°
c = 19.202 (11) ŵ = 0.10 mm1
β = 101.156 (17)°T = 293 K
V = 1403.1 (14) Å3Plate like, yellow
Z = 40.25 × 0.22 × 0.12 mm
Data collection top
Bruker CCD APEX-2
diffractometer
2475 independent reflections
Radiation source: fine-focus sealed tube1236 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.060
hemisphere scansθmax = 25.0°, θmin = 2.0°
Absorption correction: empirical (using intensity measurements)
sadabs
h = 1212
Tmin = 0.976, Tmax = 0.989k = 88
15971 measured reflectionsl = 2122
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methods
Least-squares matrix: fullSecondary atom site location: difference Fourier map
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.043Hydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
wR(F2) = 0.080H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
S = 1.68 w = 1/[σ2(Fo2) + (0.010P)2]
where P = (Fo2 + 2Fc2)/3
2475 reflections(Δ/σ)max = 0.007
199 parametersΔρmax = 0.21 e Å3
0 restraintsΔρmin = 0.23 e Å3
Special details top

Geometry. All e.s.d.'s (except the e.s.d. in the dihedral angle between two l.s. planes) are estimated using the full covariance matrix. The cell e.s.d.'s are taken into account individually in the estimation of e.s.d.'s in distances, angles and torsion angles; correlations between e.s.d.'s in cell parameters are only used when they are defined by crystal symmetry. An approximate (isotropic) treatment of cell e.s.d.'s is used for estimating e.s.d.'s involving l.s. planes.

Refinement. Refinement of F2 against ALL reflections. The weighted R-factor wR and goodness of fit S are based on F2, conventional R-factors R are based on F, with F set to zero for negative F2. The threshold expression of F2 > σ(F2) is used only for calculating R-factors(gt) etc. and is not relevant to the choice of reflections for refinement. R-factors based on F2 are statistically about twice as large as those based on F, and R- factors based on ALL data will be even larger.

Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
N110.14943 (19)0.3152 (3)0.27092 (9)0.0479 (6)
O110.13155 (15)0.3566 (3)0.06687 (8)0.0625 (6)
C110.0715 (2)0.3485 (3)0.16133 (12)0.0340 (6)
C120.1688 (2)0.3313 (3)0.20060 (11)0.0447 (7)
H120.25500.33090.17590.054*
C130.0251 (2)0.3174 (3)0.30499 (12)0.0482 (7)
H130.00800.30380.35410.058*
C140.0786 (2)0.3384 (4)0.27182 (12)0.0503 (7)
H140.16380.34150.29790.060*
C150.0548 (2)0.3551 (3)0.19895 (12)0.0454 (7)
H150.12410.37070.17530.054*
C160.0991 (2)0.3562 (3)0.08336 (11)0.0408 (6)
H160.02680.37000.06190.049*
C170.2131 (2)0.3460 (3)0.04051 (11)0.0429 (7)
H170.28850.33800.05960.051*
C180.2248 (2)0.3470 (3)0.03710 (12)0.0420 (7)
O210.58052 (15)0.3899 (2)0.15759 (8)0.0585 (5)
N210.55915 (19)0.2731 (3)0.49254 (9)0.0518 (6)
C210.6347 (2)0.3454 (3)0.38489 (12)0.0358 (6)
C220.5404 (2)0.2945 (4)0.42231 (12)0.0530 (8)
H220.45640.27310.39650.064*
C230.6812 (3)0.3037 (3)0.52792 (12)0.0531 (8)
H230.69830.28810.57690.064*
C240.7814 (3)0.3563 (4)0.49643 (13)0.0587 (8)
H240.86450.37760.52340.070*
C250.7582 (2)0.3775 (3)0.42381 (12)0.0483 (7)
H250.82570.41340.40120.058*
C260.6090 (2)0.3616 (3)0.30736 (11)0.0411 (6)
H260.68000.39560.28720.049*
C270.4972 (2)0.3337 (3)0.26284 (11)0.0427 (7)
H270.42300.30210.28060.051*
C280.4874 (2)0.3515 (4)0.18536 (12)0.0424 (7)
N310.34719 (17)0.3318 (3)0.07380 (9)0.0453 (6)
H310.41230.32730.05220.054*
N320.36744 (17)0.3237 (3)0.14676 (9)0.0444 (6)
H320.30290.30060.16750.053*
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
N110.0432 (13)0.0747 (17)0.0253 (12)0.0046 (12)0.0053 (10)0.0020 (11)
O110.0460 (11)0.1105 (16)0.0332 (10)0.0188 (11)0.0133 (9)0.0091 (10)
C110.0333 (14)0.0401 (17)0.0273 (13)0.0005 (13)0.0028 (11)0.0012 (13)
C120.0343 (14)0.0670 (19)0.0302 (15)0.0009 (14)0.0001 (12)0.0002 (14)
C130.0527 (17)0.0600 (19)0.0285 (15)0.0008 (15)0.0009 (14)0.0025 (14)
C140.0370 (15)0.072 (2)0.0369 (16)0.0044 (15)0.0048 (13)0.0054 (15)
C150.0364 (14)0.0619 (19)0.0368 (15)0.0035 (14)0.0048 (12)0.0008 (14)
C160.0407 (16)0.0531 (18)0.0290 (14)0.0035 (14)0.0077 (12)0.0016 (13)
C170.0401 (16)0.063 (2)0.0272 (15)0.0043 (14)0.0106 (13)0.0020 (14)
C180.0423 (16)0.0521 (18)0.0294 (15)0.0070 (15)0.0013 (13)0.0036 (14)
O210.0493 (11)0.0949 (15)0.0324 (10)0.0171 (10)0.0100 (9)0.0033 (9)
N210.0501 (14)0.0791 (17)0.0243 (12)0.0043 (12)0.0026 (10)0.0024 (11)
C210.0378 (14)0.0412 (15)0.0265 (12)0.0044 (15)0.0019 (11)0.0003 (15)
C220.0435 (16)0.087 (2)0.0265 (15)0.0108 (15)0.0009 (12)0.0001 (14)
C230.0640 (19)0.066 (2)0.0250 (15)0.0023 (16)0.0008 (14)0.0014 (14)
C240.0484 (18)0.083 (2)0.0397 (18)0.0120 (17)0.0050 (14)0.0012 (16)
C250.0419 (16)0.068 (2)0.0331 (15)0.0077 (14)0.0014 (13)0.0032 (14)
C260.0412 (15)0.0521 (18)0.0302 (14)0.0066 (14)0.0070 (12)0.0002 (14)
C270.0433 (15)0.0588 (18)0.0260 (14)0.0074 (15)0.0070 (12)0.0022 (14)
C280.0406 (16)0.0537 (18)0.0306 (15)0.0060 (15)0.0015 (13)0.0039 (14)
N310.0434 (14)0.0726 (17)0.0195 (11)0.0042 (12)0.0049 (10)0.0004 (11)
N320.0432 (13)0.0687 (17)0.0200 (11)0.0081 (11)0.0028 (10)0.0018 (11)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
N11—C131.332 (3)N21—C231.337 (3)
N11—C121.331 (3)C21—C221.373 (3)
O11—C181.219 (2)C21—C251.375 (3)
C11—C121.380 (3)C21—C261.465 (3)
C11—C151.372 (3)C22—H220.9300
C11—C161.470 (3)C23—C241.356 (3)
C12—H120.9300C23—H230.9300
C13—C141.363 (3)C24—C251.377 (3)
C13—H130.9300C24—H240.9300
C14—C151.378 (3)C25—H250.9300
C14—H140.9300C26—C271.319 (3)
C15—H150.9300C26—H260.9300
C16—C171.308 (3)C27—C281.477 (3)
C16—H160.9300C27—H270.9300
C17—C181.472 (3)C28—N321.337 (2)
C17—H170.9300N31—N321.377 (2)
C18—N311.335 (3)N31—H310.8600
O21—C281.224 (2)N32—H320.8600
N21—C221.333 (3)
C13—N11—C12116.1 (2)C25—C21—C26120.4 (2)
C12—C11—C15116.4 (2)N21—C22—C21125.5 (2)
C12—C11—C16122.7 (2)N21—C22—H22117.3
C15—C11—C16120.9 (2)C21—C22—H22117.3
C11—C12—N11125.4 (2)C24—C23—N21123.7 (2)
C11—C12—H12117.3C24—C23—H23118.1
N11—C12—H12117.3N21—C23—H23118.1
N11—C13—C14123.6 (2)C23—C24—C25118.9 (2)
N11—C13—H13118.2C23—C24—H24120.6
C14—C13—H13118.2C25—C24—H24120.6
C13—C14—C15118.7 (2)C24—C25—C21119.6 (2)
C13—C14—H14120.6C24—C25—H25120.2
C15—C14—H14120.6C21—C25—H25120.2
C11—C15—C14119.8 (2)C27—C26—C21127.6 (2)
C11—C15—H15120.1C27—C26—H26116.2
C14—C15—H15120.1C21—C26—H26116.2
C17—C16—C11127.8 (2)C26—C27—C28121.3 (2)
C17—C16—H16116.1C26—C27—H27119.3
C11—C16—H16116.1C28—C27—H27119.3
C16—C17—C18121.6 (2)O21—C28—N32121.6 (2)
C16—C17—H17119.2O21—C28—C27123.5 (2)
C18—C17—H17119.2N32—C28—C27114.9 (2)
O11—C18—N31121.4 (2)C18—N31—N32118.88 (19)
O11—C18—C17123.9 (2)C18—N31—H31120.6
N31—C18—C17114.7 (2)N32—N31—H31120.6
C22—N21—C23115.7 (2)C28—N32—N31120.01 (19)
C22—C21—C25116.6 (2)C28—N32—H32120.0
C22—C21—C26123.0 (2)N31—N32—H32120.0
C15—C11—C12—N112.1 (4)C22—N21—C23—C241.0 (4)
C16—C11—C12—N11176.8 (2)N21—C23—C24—C250.9 (4)
C13—N11—C12—C110.4 (4)C23—C24—C25—C210.0 (4)
C12—N11—C13—C141.3 (4)C22—C21—C25—C240.5 (4)
N11—C13—C14—C151.2 (4)C26—C21—C25—C24178.1 (3)
C12—C11—C15—C142.1 (4)C22—C21—C26—C270.7 (4)
C16—C11—C15—C14176.8 (3)C25—C21—C26—C27179.3 (3)
C13—C14—C15—C110.6 (4)C21—C26—C27—C28178.6 (2)
C12—C11—C16—C171.0 (4)C26—C27—C28—O211.1 (4)
C15—C11—C16—C17177.9 (3)C26—C27—C28—N32178.5 (2)
C11—C16—C17—C18177.0 (3)O11—C18—N31—N321.2 (4)
C16—C17—C18—O110.2 (4)C17—C18—N31—N32177.4 (2)
C16—C17—C18—N31178.7 (3)O21—C28—N32—N312.2 (4)
C23—N21—C22—C210.4 (4)C27—C28—N32—N31178.3 (2)
C25—C21—C22—N210.4 (4)C18—N31—N32—C28164.7 (2)
C26—C21—C22—N21178.2 (2)
(3b) top
Crystal data top
C18H18N4O2F(000) = 1360
Mr = 322.36Dx = 1.295 Mg m3
Monoclinic, C2/cMo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
a = 34.566 (5) ÅCell parameters from 2951 reflections
b = 9.3338 (13) Åθ = 2.3–25.5°
c = 10.4191 (15) ŵ = 0.09 mm1
β = 100.401 (4)°T = 293 K
V = 3306.3 (8) Å3Block, white
Z = 80.28 × 0.18 × 0.16 mm
Data collection top
Bruker CCD APEX-2
diffractometer
2951 independent reflections
Radiation source: fine-focus sealed tube2171 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.031
?hemisphere scansθmax = 25.5°, θmin = 2.3°
Absorption correction: empirical (using intensity measurements)
sadabs
h = 4141
Tmin = 0.981, Tmax = 0.986k = 1111
18928 measured reflectionsl = 1212
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methods
Least-squares matrix: fullSecondary atom site location: difference Fourier map
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.059Hydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
wR(F2) = 0.189H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
S = 1.37 w = 1/[σ2(Fo2) + (0.1P)2]
where P = (Fo2 + 2Fc2)/3
2951 reflections(Δ/σ)max = 0.001
217 parametersΔρmax = 0.61 e Å3
1 restraintΔρmin = 0.36 e Å3
Special details top

Geometry. All e.s.d.'s (except the e.s.d. in the dihedral angle between two l.s. planes) are estimated using the full covariance matrix. The cell e.s.d.'s are taken into account individually in the estimation of e.s.d.'s in distances, angles and torsion angles; correlations between e.s.d.'s in cell parameters are only used when they are defined by crystal symmetry. An approximate (isotropic) treatment of cell e.s.d.'s is used for estimating e.s.d.'s involving l.s. planes.

Refinement. Refinement of F2 against ALL reflections. The weighted R-factor wR and goodness of fit S are based on F2, conventional R-factors R are based on F, with F set to zero for negative F2. The threshold expression of F2 > σ(F2) is used only for calculating R-factors(gt) etc. and is not relevant to the choice of reflections for refinement. R-factors based on F2 are statistically about twice as large as those based on F, and R- factors based on ALL data will be even larger.

Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
N11A0.31441 (6)0.0114 (2)1.0199 (2)0.0647 (6)
O11A0.44538 (4)0.19593 (16)0.69020 (16)0.0613 (5)
C18A0.44102 (6)0.0652 (2)0.67487 (19)0.0451 (5)
C11A0.36627 (6)0.0228 (2)0.89571 (19)0.0434 (5)
C12A0.33994 (7)0.0604 (2)0.9495 (2)0.0550 (6)
H12A0.34020.15870.93490.066*
C13A0.31418 (7)0.1301 (3)1.0385 (2)0.0649 (7)
H13A0.29630.16781.08630.078*
C14A0.33891 (7)0.2226 (3)0.9907 (2)0.0626 (6)
H14A0.33760.32061.00570.075*
C15A0.36557 (7)0.1689 (2)0.9207 (2)0.0548 (6)
H15A0.38310.23000.89010.066*
C16A0.39322 (6)0.0453 (2)0.82159 (19)0.0472 (5)
H16A0.39590.14410.83030.057*
C17A0.41437 (6)0.0175 (2)0.74317 (19)0.0459 (5)
H17A0.41240.11610.73080.055*
N21A0.46086 (5)0.01019 (19)0.59961 (17)0.0486 (5)
H21A0.45760.10150.59440.058*
C21A0.48780 (6)0.0566 (2)0.5263 (2)0.0479 (5)
H21B0.47310.11120.45440.057*
H21C0.50500.12200.58220.057*
O11B0.43663 (6)0.30857 (18)0.5644 (3)0.1003 (8)
N11B0.30135 (7)0.6023 (2)0.8397 (2)0.0778 (7)
C11B0.33301 (6)0.4462 (2)0.7052 (2)0.0485 (5)
C12B0.33255 (7)0.5606 (2)0.7899 (2)0.0600 (6)
H12B0.35570.61220.81400.072*
C13B0.26835 (9)0.5246 (3)0.8044 (3)0.0779 (8)
H13B0.24610.55110.83730.093*
C14B0.26574 (7)0.4097 (3)0.7236 (3)0.0703 (7)
H14B0.24230.35880.70300.084*
C15B0.29828 (7)0.3690 (3)0.6722 (2)0.0600 (6)
H15B0.29690.29090.61620.072*
C16B0.36815 (7)0.4066 (2)0.6540 (2)0.0533 (6)
H16B0.36800.31640.61600.064*
C17B0.40034 (7)0.4853 (2)0.6556 (2)0.0565 (6)
H17B0.40140.57650.69220.068*
C18B0.43419 (8)0.4332 (2)0.6018 (3)0.0711 (8)
N21B0.46228 (9)0.5326 (2)0.5998 (3)0.1142 (13)
H21D0.45720.62000.61680.137*
C21B0.50362 (11)0.4970 (4)0.5684 (3)0.0928 (10)
H21E0.52310.56740.60580.111*
H21F0.51240.40240.59960.111*
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
N11A0.0653 (13)0.0662 (13)0.0707 (13)0.0114 (10)0.0334 (11)0.0077 (9)
O11A0.0662 (10)0.0444 (9)0.0815 (11)0.0039 (7)0.0352 (8)0.0022 (7)
C18A0.0437 (11)0.0449 (12)0.0483 (11)0.0013 (9)0.0126 (9)0.0042 (8)
C11A0.0444 (11)0.0460 (11)0.0424 (10)0.0023 (8)0.0144 (9)0.0012 (8)
C12A0.0596 (13)0.0455 (13)0.0653 (14)0.0089 (10)0.0259 (11)0.0020 (10)
C13A0.0634 (14)0.0697 (17)0.0687 (14)0.0010 (12)0.0313 (12)0.0101 (12)
C14A0.0810 (16)0.0478 (13)0.0654 (14)0.0025 (11)0.0304 (12)0.0071 (10)
C15A0.0690 (14)0.0466 (12)0.0547 (12)0.0069 (10)0.0269 (11)0.0007 (9)
C16A0.0481 (11)0.0421 (11)0.0533 (12)0.0004 (9)0.0144 (10)0.0025 (8)
C17A0.0485 (12)0.0415 (11)0.0510 (12)0.0008 (8)0.0178 (10)0.0038 (8)
N21A0.0489 (10)0.0439 (10)0.0578 (10)0.0028 (7)0.0228 (9)0.0008 (7)
C21A0.0446 (11)0.0468 (12)0.0556 (12)0.0022 (9)0.0181 (10)0.0012 (9)
O11B0.1115 (15)0.0418 (10)0.175 (2)0.0043 (9)0.1007 (16)0.0059 (10)
N11B0.0761 (14)0.0602 (13)0.1127 (17)0.0122 (11)0.0588 (13)0.0232 (12)
C11B0.0539 (13)0.0417 (11)0.0543 (12)0.0010 (9)0.0219 (10)0.0027 (9)
C12B0.0570 (13)0.0536 (13)0.0789 (15)0.0106 (10)0.0378 (12)0.0114 (11)
C13B0.0631 (16)0.0620 (16)0.120 (2)0.0040 (12)0.0459 (16)0.0012 (15)
C14B0.0487 (13)0.0723 (17)0.0942 (19)0.0075 (11)0.0242 (12)0.0007 (14)
C15B0.0584 (13)0.0564 (14)0.0690 (14)0.0092 (10)0.0221 (11)0.0061 (11)
C16B0.0631 (13)0.0402 (11)0.0643 (13)0.0018 (10)0.0321 (11)0.0010 (9)
C17B0.0632 (15)0.0397 (11)0.0742 (15)0.0033 (10)0.0334 (12)0.0006 (10)
C18B0.0785 (17)0.0392 (13)0.113 (2)0.0072 (11)0.0629 (16)0.0028 (12)
N21B0.134 (2)0.0412 (12)0.204 (3)0.0017 (13)0.127 (3)0.0050 (15)
C21B0.0856 (19)0.0746 (18)0.122 (3)0.0015 (15)0.029 (2)0.0052 (19)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
N11A—C13A1.335 (3)O11B—C18B1.235 (3)
N11A—C12A1.327 (3)N11B—C12B1.336 (3)
O11A—C18A1.236 (2)N11B—C13B1.346 (4)
C18A—N21A1.332 (2)C11B—C12B1.388 (3)
C18A—C17A1.479 (3)C11B—C15B1.389 (3)
C11A—C12A1.389 (3)C11B—C16B1.460 (3)
C11A—C15A1.389 (3)C13B—C14B1.357 (4)
C11A—C16A1.459 (3)C14B—C15B1.383 (3)
C13A—C14A1.370 (3)C16B—C17B1.331 (3)
C14A—C15A1.369 (3)C17B—C18B1.469 (3)
C16A—C17A1.327 (3)C18B—N21B1.346 (3)
N21A—C21A1.448 (2)N21B—C21B1.559 (4)
C21A—C21Ai1.514 (4)C21B—C21Bii1.402 (7)
C13A—N11A—C12A116.32 (19)C12B—N11B—C13B116.2 (2)
O11A—C18A—N21A122.24 (18)C12B—C11B—C15B116.6 (2)
O11A—C18A—C17A121.68 (18)C12B—C11B—C16B122.2 (2)
N21A—C18A—C17A116.04 (18)C15B—C11B—C16B121.2 (2)
C12A—C11A—C15A116.01 (19)N11B—C12B—C11B125.0 (2)
C12A—C11A—C16A119.82 (18)N11B—C13B—C14B123.6 (2)
C15A—C11A—C16A124.15 (18)C15B—C14B—C13B119.3 (2)
N11A—C12A—C11A125.4 (2)C14B—C15B—C11B119.3 (2)
N11A—C13A—C14A123.4 (2)C17B—C16B—C11B127.2 (2)
C13A—C14A—C15A119.1 (2)C16B—C17B—C18B122.3 (2)
C14A—C15A—C11A119.7 (2)O11B—C18B—N21B123.6 (2)
C17A—C16A—C11A127.51 (19)O11B—C18B—C17B122.5 (2)
C16A—C17A—C18A121.71 (19)N21B—C18B—C17B113.8 (2)
C18A—N21A—C21A122.14 (17)C18B—N21B—C21B123.2 (2)
N21A—C21A—C21Ai110.1 (2)C21Bii—C21B—N21B101.7 (4)
Symmetry codes: (i) x+1, y, z+1; (ii) x+1, y+1, z+1.
(4b) top
Crystal data top
C18H18N4O2F(000) = 340
Mr = 322.36Dx = 1.321 Mg m3
Monoclinic, P21/nMo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
a = 4.7967 (15) ÅCell parameters from 1377 reflections
b = 11.547 (4) Åθ = 2.3–25.0°
c = 14.726 (5) ŵ = 0.09 mm1
β = 96.451 (10)°T = 293 K
V = 810.5 (4) Å3Block, white
Z = 20.26 × 0.13 × 0.11 mm
Data collection top
Bruker CCD APEX-2
diffractometer
1377 independent reflections
Radiation source: fine-focus sealed tube478 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.242
hemisphere scansθmax = 25.0°, θmin = 2.3°
Absorption correction: empirical (using intensity measurements)
sadabs
h = 55
Tmin = 0.986, Tmax = 0.990k = 1313
9068 measured reflectionsl = 1715
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methods
Least-squares matrix: fullSecondary atom site location: difference Fourier map
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.065Hydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
wR(F2) = 0.140H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
S = 0.90 w = 1/[σ2(Fo2) + (0.050P)2]
where P = (Fo2 + 2Fc2)/3
1377 reflections(Δ/σ)max < 0.001
109 parametersΔρmax = 0.26 e Å3
0 restraintsΔρmin = 0.19 e Å3
Special details top

Geometry. All e.s.d.'s (except the e.s.d. in the dihedral angle between two l.s. planes) are estimated using the full covariance matrix. The cell e.s.d.'s are taken into account individually in the estimation of e.s.d.'s in distances, angles and torsion angles; correlations between e.s.d.'s in cell parameters are only used when they are defined by crystal symmetry. An approximate (isotropic) treatment of cell e.s.d.'s is used for estimating e.s.d.'s involving l.s. planes.

Refinement. Refinement of F2 against ALL reflections. The weighted R-factor wR and goodness of fit S are based on F2, conventional R-factors R are based on F, with F set to zero for negative F2. The threshold expression of F2 > σ(F2) is used only for calculating R-factors(gt) etc. and is not relevant to the choice of reflections for refinement. R-factors based on F2 are statistically about twice as large as those based on F, and R- factors based on ALL data will be even larger.

Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
O110.2469 (6)0.2568 (3)0.0331 (2)0.0628 (10)
N110.6676 (8)0.5082 (3)0.2638 (3)0.0547 (12)
C110.5401 (10)0.4068 (4)0.2855 (3)0.0541 (13)
H110.57860.37030.33890.065*
C120.3559 (9)0.3533 (4)0.2335 (3)0.0475 (13)
H120.27260.28330.25250.057*
C130.2948 (9)0.4052 (4)0.1519 (3)0.0369 (12)
C150.6103 (10)0.5564 (4)0.1858 (4)0.0573 (15)
H150.69800.62590.16820.069*
C140.4283 (9)0.5090 (4)0.1295 (3)0.0482 (14)
H140.39550.54730.07620.058*
C160.1074 (9)0.3535 (4)0.0912 (3)0.0479 (13)
H160.09270.39100.03610.058*
C170.0426 (9)0.2584 (4)0.1078 (3)0.0397 (12)
H170.03190.21930.16250.048*
C180.2286 (9)0.2117 (4)0.0419 (3)0.0416 (12)
N210.3717 (7)0.1165 (3)0.0723 (2)0.0450 (10)
H210.34990.09060.12580.054*
C210.5613 (9)0.0558 (3)0.0185 (3)0.0472 (14)
H21A0.73620.04030.05630.057*
H21B0.60280.10470.03180.057*
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
O110.081 (3)0.058 (2)0.054 (2)0.0046 (19)0.028 (2)0.0084 (18)
N110.059 (3)0.050 (3)0.056 (3)0.001 (2)0.011 (3)0.011 (2)
C110.056 (3)0.062 (3)0.046 (3)0.002 (3)0.014 (3)0.001 (3)
C120.042 (3)0.045 (3)0.058 (3)0.008 (2)0.017 (3)0.002 (3)
C130.035 (3)0.037 (3)0.039 (3)0.007 (2)0.006 (2)0.004 (2)
C150.057 (4)0.042 (3)0.074 (4)0.009 (3)0.017 (3)0.003 (3)
C140.061 (4)0.042 (3)0.042 (3)0.009 (3)0.007 (3)0.001 (2)
C160.056 (3)0.047 (3)0.043 (3)0.005 (3)0.016 (3)0.004 (2)
C170.052 (3)0.032 (3)0.039 (3)0.001 (2)0.021 (3)0.006 (2)
C180.044 (3)0.039 (3)0.045 (3)0.010 (3)0.018 (3)0.006 (2)
N210.049 (3)0.040 (2)0.052 (2)0.005 (2)0.030 (2)0.000 (2)
C210.041 (3)0.042 (3)0.063 (3)0.001 (2)0.022 (3)0.004 (2)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
O11—C181.232 (5)C15—C141.382 (5)
N11—C151.332 (5)C16—C171.320 (5)
N11—C111.342 (5)C17—C181.492 (5)
C11—C121.378 (5)C18—N211.345 (5)
C12—C131.403 (5)N21—C211.452 (5)
C13—C141.382 (5)C21—C21i1.494 (7)
C13—C161.463 (5)
C15—N11—C11115.9 (4)C17—C16—C13125.8 (4)
N11—C11—C12124.2 (4)C16—C17—C18122.3 (4)
C13—C12—C11119.5 (4)O11—C18—N21123.9 (4)
C14—C13—C12116.0 (4)O11—C18—C17122.5 (4)
C14—C13—C16120.5 (4)N21—C18—C17113.5 (4)
C12—C13—C16123.4 (4)C18—N21—C21122.7 (4)
N11—C15—C14123.9 (4)N21—C21—C21i111.7 (4)
C13—C14—C15120.5 (4)
Symmetry code: (i) x+1, y, z.
(4c) top
Crystal data top
C20H22N4O2·2(H2O)Z = 2
Mr = 386.45F(000) = 412
Monoclinic, P21/cDx = 1.326 Mg m3
a = 12.78 (2) ÅMo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
b = 4.681 (9) ŵ = 0.09 mm1
c = 16.21 (3) ÅT = 100 K
β = 93.42 (3)°Needles, light brown
V = 968 (3) Å30.16 × 0.15 × 0.10 mm
Data collection top
Bruker CCD APEX-2
diffractometer
1533 independent reflections
Radiation source: fine-focus sealed tube829 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.170
Hemisphere scansθmax = 25.0°, θmin = 1.6°
Absorption correction: empirical (using intensity measurements)
sadabs
h = 1014
Tmin = 0.985, Tmax = 0.991k = 55
2184 measured reflectionsl = 196
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methods
Least-squares matrix: fullSecondary atom site location: difference Fourier map
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.085Hydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
wR(F2) = 0.224H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
S = 0.95 w = 1/[σ2(Fo2) + (0.1P)2]
where P = (Fo2 + 2Fc2)/3
1533 reflections(Δ/σ)max = 0.061
133 parametersΔρmax = 0.32 e Å3
0 restraintsΔρmin = 0.41 e Å3
Special details top

Geometry. All e.s.d.'s (except the e.s.d. in the dihedral angle between two l.s. planes) are estimated using the full covariance matrix. The cell e.s.d.'s are taken into account individually in the estimation of e.s.d.'s in distances, angles and torsion angles; correlations between e.s.d.'s in cell parameters are only used when they are defined by crystal symmetry. An approximate (isotropic) treatment of cell e.s.d.'s is used for estimating e.s.d.'s involving l.s. planes.

Refinement. Refinement of F2 against ALL reflections. The weighted R-factor wR and goodness of fit S are based on F2, conventional R-factors R are based on F, with F set to zero for negative F2. The threshold expression of F2 > σ(F2) is used only for calculating R-factors(gt) etc. and is not relevant to the choice of reflections for refinement. R-factors based on F2 are statistically about twice as large as those based on F, and R- factors based on ALL data will be even larger.

Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
O110.2085 (2)0.1741 (8)0.90035 (18)0.0307 (9)
N110.2870 (3)0.8264 (9)0.8396 (2)0.0323 (11)
C220.4442 (3)0.5477 (11)0.9989 (3)0.0275 (12)
H22A0.44160.74621.01580.033*
H22B0.40700.43571.03810.033*
N210.2831 (3)0.6104 (8)0.9104 (2)0.0251 (10)
H210.27130.79100.91280.030*
O1W0.4900 (3)1.0206 (8)0.7952 (2)0.0329 (10)
H2W0.437 (4)0.970 (13)0.797 (4)0.050*
H1W0.514 (4)1.199 (13)0.768 (3)0.050*
C120.1199 (4)0.7891 (10)0.9105 (3)0.0261 (12)
H120.07440.85150.95370.031*
C170.0995 (4)0.5784 (11)0.8974 (3)0.0263 (12)
H170.09450.76480.91660.032*
C180.2016 (4)0.4377 (11)0.9033 (3)0.0243 (12)
C140.1617 (4)0.4945 (11)0.7965 (3)0.0309 (13)
H140.14500.35180.75960.037*
C150.2576 (4)0.6183 (11)0.7896 (3)0.0341 (14)
H150.30520.55540.74790.041*
C130.0889 (4)0.5777 (10)0.8575 (3)0.0261 (12)
C160.0136 (4)0.4516 (10)0.8659 (3)0.0264 (12)
H160.02030.26450.84750.032*
C210.3900 (4)0.5166 (10)0.9143 (3)0.0266 (12)
H21A0.42820.62610.87510.032*
H21B0.39220.31750.89790.032*
C110.2168 (4)0.9043 (11)0.8991 (3)0.0322 (14)
H110.23541.04740.93520.039*
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
O110.031 (2)0.033 (2)0.0289 (18)0.0015 (17)0.0039 (15)0.0016 (15)
N110.030 (3)0.040 (3)0.027 (2)0.001 (2)0.002 (2)0.004 (2)
C220.023 (3)0.035 (3)0.025 (3)0.003 (2)0.003 (2)0.003 (2)
N210.024 (3)0.024 (2)0.027 (2)0.0002 (19)0.0027 (18)0.0011 (17)
O1W0.031 (2)0.035 (2)0.0335 (19)0.0052 (19)0.0044 (19)0.0010 (17)
C120.020 (3)0.032 (3)0.027 (3)0.003 (2)0.004 (2)0.003 (2)
C170.027 (3)0.030 (3)0.023 (3)0.001 (2)0.003 (2)0.001 (2)
C180.033 (3)0.024 (3)0.016 (2)0.003 (2)0.004 (2)0.001 (2)
C140.026 (3)0.039 (3)0.029 (3)0.001 (3)0.004 (2)0.003 (2)
C150.032 (3)0.044 (3)0.026 (3)0.005 (3)0.000 (2)0.002 (2)
C130.022 (3)0.033 (3)0.023 (3)0.002 (2)0.002 (2)0.006 (2)
C160.027 (3)0.031 (3)0.022 (2)0.002 (2)0.005 (2)0.002 (2)
C210.021 (3)0.031 (3)0.028 (3)0.000 (2)0.002 (2)0.000 (2)
C110.030 (3)0.041 (3)0.026 (3)0.003 (3)0.004 (2)0.000 (2)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
O11—C181.238 (6)C12—C111.354 (6)
N11—C111.328 (6)C12—C131.384 (7)
N11—C151.335 (6)C17—C161.323 (6)
C22—C22i1.493 (9)C17—C181.460 (7)
C22—C211.505 (7)C14—C151.354 (7)
N21—C181.318 (6)C14—C131.372 (7)
N21—C211.434 (6)C13—C161.437 (7)
C11—N11—C15116.0 (4)C15—C14—C13120.6 (5)
C22i—C22—C21112.3 (5)N11—C15—C14123.2 (5)
C18—N21—C21124.2 (4)C14—C13—C12116.4 (4)
C11—C12—C13119.5 (5)C14—C13—C16121.8 (5)
C16—C17—C18122.7 (5)C12—C13—C16121.9 (5)
O11—C18—N21123.9 (5)C17—C16—C13125.7 (5)
O11—C18—C17120.8 (5)N21—C21—C22113.3 (4)
N21—C18—C17115.3 (5)N11—C11—C12124.3 (5)
Symmetry code: (i) x+1, y+1, z+2.
(4d) top
Crystal data top
C22H26N4O2·2(H2O)Z = 2
Mr = 414.50F(000) = 444
Monoclinic, P21/nDx = 1.206 Mg m3
a = 7.3720 (7) ÅMo Kα radiation, λ = 0.71073 Å
b = 4.9035 (4) ŵ = 0.08 mm1
c = 31.586 (3) ÅT = 293 K
β = 90.197 (3)°Plates, brown
V = 1141.78 (18) Å30.28 × 0.19 × 0.15 mm
Data collection top
Bruker CCD APEX-2
diffractometer
2105 independent reflections
Radiation source: fine-focus sealed tube1748 reflections with I > 2σ(I)
Graphite monochromatorRint = 0.027
hemisphere scansθmax = 25.5°, θmin = 2.6°
Absorption correction: empirical (using intensity measurements)
sadabs
h = 88
Tmin = 0.981, Tmax = 0.987k = 55
13027 measured reflectionsl = 3638
Refinement top
Refinement on F2Primary atom site location: structure-invariant direct methods
Least-squares matrix: fullSecondary atom site location: difference Fourier map
R[F2 > 2σ(F2)] = 0.060Hydrogen site location: inferred from neighbouring sites
wR(F2) = 0.208H atoms treated by a mixture of independent and constrained refinement
S = 1.60 w = 1/[σ2(Fo2) + (0.1P)2]
where P = (Fo2 + 2Fc2)/3
2105 reflections(Δ/σ)max = 0.020
142 parametersΔρmax = 0.36 e Å3
0 restraintsΔρmin = 0.24 e Å3
Special details top

Geometry. All e.s.d.'s (except the e.s.d. in the dihedral angle between two l.s. planes) are estimated using the full covariance matrix. The cell e.s.d.'s are taken into account individually in the estimation of e.s.d.'s in distances, angles and torsion angles; correlations between e.s.d.'s in cell parameters are only used when they are defined by crystal symmetry. An approximate (isotropic) treatment of cell e.s.d.'s is used for estimating e.s.d.'s involving l.s. planes.

Refinement. Refinement of F2 against ALL reflections. The weighted R-factor wR and goodness of fit S are based on F2, conventional R-factors R are based on F, with F set to zero for negative F2. The threshold expression of F2 > σ(F2) is used only for calculating R-factors(gt) etc. and is not relevant to the choice of reflections for refinement. R-factors based on F2 are statistically about twice as large as those based on F, and R- factors based on ALL data will be even larger.

Fractional atomic coordinates and isotropic or equivalent isotropic displacement parameters (Å2) top
xyzUiso*/Ueq
O110.3873 (2)1.0864 (3)0.07507 (6)0.0657 (5)
N110.3445 (3)0.6147 (6)0.20088 (8)0.0842 (8)
C110.1841 (4)0.4948 (6)0.20164 (8)0.0799 (8)
H110.16760.35140.22050.096*
C120.0405 (4)0.5663 (5)0.17670 (8)0.0661 (7)
H120.06900.47310.17880.079*
C130.0607 (3)0.7799 (5)0.14825 (7)0.0519 (6)
C140.2278 (3)0.9080 (6)0.14762 (8)0.0686 (7)
H140.24781.05390.12940.082*
C150.3640 (3)0.8210 (7)0.17375 (9)0.0808 (9)
H150.47530.91000.17250.097*
C160.0873 (3)0.8707 (4)0.12081 (7)0.0535 (6)
H160.08121.04920.11100.064*
C170.2277 (3)0.7260 (4)0.10870 (7)0.0501 (5)
H170.23630.54520.11740.060*
C180.3727 (3)0.8402 (4)0.08175 (6)0.0468 (5)
N210.4887 (2)0.6588 (3)0.06527 (6)0.0506 (5)
H210.47320.48830.07050.061*
C210.6392 (3)0.7413 (4)0.03898 (7)0.0509 (6)
H21A0.69940.89600.05200.061*
H21B0.59290.80000.01170.061*
C220.7758 (3)0.5171 (4)0.03230 (7)0.0487 (6)
H22A0.82310.45850.05950.058*
H22B0.71640.36220.01910.058*
C230.9312 (3)0.6101 (4)0.00464 (7)0.0483 (6)
H23A0.88230.67690.02190.058*
H23B0.99240.76110.01850.058*
O1W0.6639 (4)0.5442 (5)0.25232 (11)0.1144 (9)
H1W0.702 (4)0.465 (6)0.2228 (9)0.080*
H2W0.558 (4)0.544 (5)0.2358 (9)0.080*
Atomic displacement parameters (Å2) top
U11U22U33U12U13U23
O110.0687 (10)0.0350 (8)0.0937 (12)0.0026 (7)0.0263 (9)0.0084 (7)
N110.0753 (15)0.1052 (19)0.0724 (15)0.0218 (14)0.0274 (12)0.0149 (14)
C110.095 (2)0.0796 (18)0.0658 (16)0.0089 (14)0.0279 (15)0.0015 (13)
C120.0694 (15)0.0699 (15)0.0591 (14)0.0016 (12)0.0167 (11)0.0026 (12)
C130.0508 (12)0.0553 (12)0.0498 (12)0.0030 (9)0.0090 (9)0.0077 (10)
C140.0572 (14)0.0824 (17)0.0663 (15)0.0049 (12)0.0060 (11)0.0058 (12)
C150.0506 (14)0.112 (2)0.0796 (18)0.0010 (14)0.0096 (13)0.0187 (18)
C160.0550 (12)0.0475 (12)0.0581 (13)0.0005 (9)0.0076 (10)0.0018 (9)
C170.0503 (11)0.0406 (10)0.0595 (12)0.0019 (8)0.0095 (10)0.0045 (9)
C180.0489 (11)0.0353 (10)0.0563 (12)0.0003 (8)0.0068 (9)0.0037 (8)
N210.0515 (10)0.0320 (9)0.0684 (11)0.0010 (7)0.0177 (8)0.0054 (7)
C210.0515 (11)0.0355 (10)0.0658 (13)0.0005 (8)0.0136 (10)0.0093 (9)
C220.0459 (11)0.0357 (10)0.0644 (13)0.0008 (8)0.0075 (10)0.0062 (9)
C230.0467 (11)0.0341 (10)0.0642 (13)0.0005 (8)0.0077 (9)0.0057 (8)
O1W0.0776 (14)0.1009 (17)0.165 (2)0.0096 (12)0.0457 (16)0.0090 (16)
Geometric parameters (Å, º) top
O11—C181.230 (2)C16—C171.313 (3)
N11—C111.321 (4)C17—C181.479 (3)
N11—C151.333 (4)C18—N211.340 (3)
C11—C121.367 (4)N21—C211.446 (3)
C12—C131.388 (3)C21—C221.506 (3)
C13—C141.383 (3)C22—C231.513 (3)
C13—C161.465 (3)C23—C23i1.511 (4)
C14—C151.370 (4)
C11—N11—C15116.3 (2)C16—C17—C18122.35 (19)
N11—C11—C12124.8 (3)O11—C18—N21121.91 (18)
C11—C12—C13119.0 (3)O11—C18—C17122.26 (18)
C14—C13—C12116.5 (2)N21—C18—C17115.83 (17)
C14—C13—C16121.2 (2)C18—N21—C21121.95 (16)
C12—C13—C16122.3 (2)N21—C21—C22113.01 (15)
C15—C14—C13120.3 (3)C23—C22—C21111.64 (15)
N11—C15—C14123.1 (3)C23i—C23—C22114.00 (19)
C17—C16—C13126.7 (2)
Symmetry code: (i) x+2, y+1, z.
 

Acknowledgements

We acknowledge DST, New Delhi, India, for financial support, DST-FIST for the single-crystal diffractometer and M. Garai acknowledges IIT Kharagpur for a research fellowship.

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IUCrJ
Volume 2| Part 5| September 2015| Pages 523-533
ISSN: 2052-2525