IUCrJ is a fully open-access peer-reviewed journal from the International Union of Crystallography (IUCr).

The journal publishes high-profile articles on all aspects of the sciences and technologies supported by the IUCr via its commissions, including emerging fields where structural results underpin the science reported in the article. Our aim is to make IUCrJ the natural home for high-quality structural science results. Chemists, biologists, physicists and material scientists are actively encouraged to report their structural studies in IUCrJ.

IUCrJ covers five broad areas:

The journal was launched in 2014 to commemorate the International Year of Crystallography.

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CryoEM lectures

Lectures by members of our Editorial Board (Richard Henderson and Sriram Subramaniam) at the BBS2016 Meeting.

Single particle electron cryomicroscopy (CryoEM) has experienced a quantum leap in its capability in recent years, due to improved electron microscopes, better detectors and better software. Using the technique invented by Jacques Dubochet and his colleagues in 1982, a thin film containing a suspension of the macromolecules of interest is plunge-frozen into liquid ethane at liquid nitrogen temperature, creating a frozen-hydrated sample in which individual images of the structures can be seen in many different orientations. Subsequent computer-based image analysis is then used to determine the three-dimensional structure, frequently at near-atomic resolution. Examples of some recent structures are presented, and some remaining barriers to further progress are discussed. CryoEM is already a very powerful method, but there are still many improvements that can be made before the approach reaches its theoretical limits. Recent breakthroughs in the field of cryo-electron microscopy provide new prospects for determination of the structures of a variety of macromolecular assemblies and small dynamic protein complexes at high resolution. In addition, advances in technologies for imaging viruses, cells and tissues in 3D at high resolution have opened up new vistas for 3D structural imaging. Emerging opportunities in molecular and cellular imaging that are enabled with these developments are reviewed, and applications to cancer research in the coming decade are discussed.
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