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Journal logoSTRUCTURAL
CHEMISTRY
ISSN: 2053-2296

September 2018 issue

Highlighted illustration

Cover illustration: Two nitro­phenyl-substituted secondary amines have been synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, 1H NMR, IR and mass spectrometry. Following nitro­sation of the amine groups via reaction with NaNO2, NO release was measured for each compound over time and the results gauged against the number of NO-donor sites. See Badour, Arnett-Butscher, Mohanty, Squattrito, Lambright & Kirschbaum [Acta Cryst. (2018), C74, 1038-1044].

research papers


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Fused tricapped {TR6} trigonal prisms (R = rare-earth metal and T = transition metal) are the structural building units in binary rare-earth–transition-metal inter­metallics, in dimers in R3Pd2 and in tetra­mers in Er6Co5–x.

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The fluoro and nitro substituents on the phenyl ring of the 1-(4-fluoro­cinnamo­yl)-3-(pyridin-2-yl)pyrazole ligand influence the planarity, inter­actions and also the mol­ecular packing of its rhenium(I) complexes.

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Two series of a total of ten cocrystals involving 4-amino-5-chloro-2,6-di­methyl­pyrimidine with various carb­oxy­lic acids have been prepared and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction.

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The thermal stability of the layered modification of the polycrystalline compound Cu0.5ZrTe2, synthesized at room temperature, has been studied in the temperature range 25–900 °C. In-situ time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments showed that the crystal structure is ruled by the copper occupation of the octa­hedral and tetra­hedral sites in the ZrTe2 inter­layer space.

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In two inclusion compounds of 4,4′-sulfonyl­dibenzoate and tetra­propyl­ammonium with various small ancillary mol­ecules, an isolated hydrogen-bonded tetra­mer is constructed in one and a ribbon is constructed in the other. Although the host anion and guest cation are the same, the difference in the ancillary small mol­ecules results in different structures, indicating the significance of ancillary mol­ecules in the formation of crystal structures.

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A hydro­thermally stable three-dimensional cobalt(II) metal–organic framework, with a (3,6)-connected topological network, was assembled from 4-(4-carb­oxy­phen­oxy)isophthalic acid. The thermal stability and magnetic properties of this coordination polymer were investigated.

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Two nitro­phenyl-substituted secondary amines have been synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, 1H NMR, IR and mass spectrometry. Following nitro­sation of the amine groups via reaction with NaNO2, NO release was measured for each compound over time and the results gauged against the number of NO-donor sites.

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A novel tantalum phosphate, Na13Sr2Ta2(PO4)9, containing isolated [Ta2(PO4)9] units, can emit intense off-white light after doping with Dy3+ ions.

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Hydro­thermal reaction between Zn(NO3)2·6H2O, naphthalene-1,4-di­carb­oxy­lic acid and 1,6-bis­(pyridin-3-yl)-1,3,5-hexa­triene afforded a three-dimensional ZnII coordination network which can be simplified as a unique 6-connected framework with the point symbol 446108.

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Both ordered and disordered crystal structures were found at ambient temperature for (Z)-2-[(E)-(4-meth­oxy­benzyl­idene)hydrazinyl­idene]-1,2-di­phenyl­ethanone. In the disordered structure, the two disorder components are related by a glide movement of the whole mol­ecule by about 1.3 Å. All noncovalent inter­actions (NCIs) have been analyzed experimentally and theoretically.

Special and virtual issues

Acta Crystallographica Section C has recently published special issues on

NMR Crystallography (March 2017)

Scorpionates: a golden anniversary (November 2016)

Full details are available on the special issues page.

The latest virtual issue features Coordination polymers, with an introduction by Len Barbour.

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